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Publication numberUS3678590 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1972
Filing dateAug 18, 1970
Priority dateAug 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3678590 A, US 3678590A, US-A-3678590, US3678590 A, US3678590A
InventorsHayward Norman G
Original AssigneeHayward Norman G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for illumination of gun sights and the like
US 3678590 A
Abstract
A series of light conductive fibers are operatively associated with a source of light and are arranged to define alignable sighting means for effective aiming of a weapon in conditions of reduced light.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [15] 3,678,590

Hayward 1 July 25, 1972 MEANS FOR ILLUMINATION 0F GUN |,93|,552 10/1933 SIGHTS AND THE LIKE FOREIGN PATENTS on APPLICATIONS I721 Rm 665.662 6/1939 Gennany "33/52 [22] Filed: Aug, 18, 1970 Primary Examiner-Leonard Forman Appl. No.: 64,674

Assislan: Examiner-Steven L. Stephan Attorney-Robert G. McMorrow 52 us. CI. ..33/241, 33/52, 24016.41, 57 ABSTRACT 350/96 B, 356/247 51 Int. Cl. 1/00. F4|g 1/32. F4lg 1 |/00 F mum? 58 Fleldolsearch ..33/S2,47;356/247;350/10, a mum and figmbk 350/96 3; 240/641 sighting means for effective aiming of a weapon in conditions of reduced light.

I 561 CM 2 Claim, 5 Drawing figures UNITED STATES PATENTS 802,277 10/1905 I4 6 I2 72 I6 30 I8 f 64 L J2 l0 'r I I,l

MEANS FOR ILLUMINATION OF GUN SIGHTS AND THE LIKE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1 Field of the Invention This invention pertains to illumination means for firearm sighting systems, and the like.

2. Statement of the Prior Art Light conductive fibers have been heretofore employed as means for the illumination of inaccessible areas, and in decorative environments. The fibers have also been employed as signal indicia in motor vehicles and in surgical uses as light sources or signalling means.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention comprises a means for effective illumination of the front and rear sights of a firearm or the like, and provides a new and novel sighting system which is particularly useful under conditions of reduced visibility. The system moreover, provides an instantly alignable sight picture with readily discernible front and rear portions.

It is a further feature of this invention that the conductive fibers are coated with an opaque substance whereby only the exposed end sections thereof are illuminated, thus effectively preventing any light emission in the direction of aim of the weapon. By this expedient, the sighting system is illuminated, but such illumination is not visible from the direction of aim, and the location of the weapon is therefore not revealed to the target area.

The system embodies a switch assembly located in close proximity to the weapon trigger so that the system may be conveniently switched to a non-operating position when not in immediate use.

Other and further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from a consideration of the following specification when read in conjunction with the annexed drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. I is a side elevational view of a firearm having a sighting system in accordance with this invention in place thereon;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, foreshortened side view partially broken away for disclosure of details;

FIG. 3 is a further enlarged, sectional view, showing details, taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 4 is another detail cross-sectional view, taken on line 4-4 of FIG. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view from the approximate plane of line 55 of FIG. 4, looking in the direction of the arrows.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring to the drawing in more detail, designated at therein is a firearm, such as a rifle or the like. The weapon 10 includes a barrel 12 with a muzzle end 14 and a breech end 16, and having a receiver assembly 18. A trigger is disposed in a trigger housing 22 on the receiver. A magazine 24 extends from the receiver along the barrel.

The present invention comprises a sighting assembly 26. Attached to the receiver 18 by a bracket 28 is a battery casing 30 of tubular form having a conventional push type switch means 32 at the end thereof adjacent the firearm trigger, and having a screw receptacle 34 (FIG. 3) at its opposite end. A storage battery 36, having a contact 38, is operatively disposed in the casing 30. An incandescent bulb 40, having a screw base 42, is engaged in the receptacle 34, and has a contact 44 engageable with the contact 38. This permits the bulb to be activated through employment of the switch 32 in the manner of a conventional flashlight.

An inner sleeve 46, preferably of a pliable plastic or the like is disposed about the bulb and bulb connector, and has a reduced diameter forward opening 48. The opening 48 exposes an illuminated end of the bulb 40. An outer, opaque sleeve 50 has a first end portion 52 and a second end portion 54. The first end portion 52 is frictionally engaged about the inner sleeve, and as shown in FIG. 3, the second end portion is of a relatively reduced diameter.

An opaque tubular extension 56 of elongated, hollow form has a proximal end 58 which abuts the inner sleeve 46, and a distal end 60. It will be observed that the second end portion 54 of the outer sleeve 50 is frictionally engaged over the end 58 of the extension. Disposed within the extension is a cylindrical, light conductive rod 62 which abuts directly against the illuminated, exposed end of the bulb. The rod conducts light introduced from the bulb throughout its length.

Engaged within the end 60 of the extension is an end of an elongated opaque first sheath 64. The sheath extends outwardly from the extension in substantially coaxial alignment therewith. An elongated second sheath 66, also opaque in character, extends from the first sheath.

A first bundle or series of light conductive fibers 68 are grouped within the first sheath, and have their collected end portions 70 disposed in abutting relation against the conductive rod 62. These "light pipes" or fibers are items which are presently commercially available, and may be formed of coated acrylic fibers having the functional characteristic of conveying light introduced at one end to an opposite end without any substantial intermediate light emission. The fibers are bendable, and function to convey the light as aforesaid even when bent or contorted. As shown in the drawing, the first series of fibers extends from the sheath and they are thereafler separated and reverted. A rear sight 72 is fixed to the barrel 12 adjacent its breech end 16, and the sight includes an upstanding leaf 74. The leaf 74 hm a V-shaped sighting groove 76 therein with slant walls converged at an apex 78. The individual fibers of the group 68 are fixedly secured to the walls of the groove at equidistantly spaced locations, and have their illuminated ends 80 exposed therein in the direction of the breech end 16. It is to be observed in FIG. 5 that a space is provided from the apex 78 on each slant wall where no fiber is affixed, for a purpose appearing below.

Disposed within the first and second sheaths 64 and 66 is a second series of fibers 82, also having their collected ends 84 abutting the rod 62 to be illuminated thereby. The sheath 66 extends along the magazine 24, and is reverted upwardly to the barrel I2 at the muzzle end I4 thereof. A forward sight mount 86 having an annular upper portion 88 engages the sheath end, the latter being open to expose the illuminated, collected ends 90 of the second series of light fibers. Referring again to FIG. 5, it is there to be noted that in a correct sight picture, the ends 90 of the second series of light fibers occupy the apex portion of the V groove, with the fiber ends 80 being symmetrically disposed on either side thereof. By virtue of the difference in size between the individual fiber ends 80 and the collected ends 90 of the forward sight, this sight picture is instantly obtainable.

The operation of the device is made clear in the foregoing description of structure. Actuation of the switch 32 energizes the battery 36 and illuminates the bulb 40. Light from the bulb is conveyed by the rod 62 to the fibers, the exposed ends of which form a sight pattern visible even under restricted lighting conditions.

I claim:

I. A sighting assembly for firearms, the firearm having a barrel with a muzzle end and a breech end and having a receiver with a trigger assembly thereon, the sighting assembly comprising:

a battery casing, having a battery operatively mounted therein, a bulb connector adjacent the battery, and hav ing a switch, secured to the receiver adjacent the trigger assembly;

an incandescent bulb mounted in the bulb connector and illuminated by the battery upon actuation of the switch;

an inner sleeve about the bulb with an opening therein to expose an illuminated portion of the bulb;

an outer opaque sleeve having first and second end portions, said first end portions being engaged about the inner sleeve;

a tubular extension having a proximal end abutting the inner sleeve and having a distal end;

the second end portion of the outer sleeve being engaged about the proximal end of the tubular extension;

a substantially cylindrical light conductive rod engaged within the extension and abutted against the bulb;

an enlarged opaque first sheath extending from the tubular extension;

a first series of light conductive fibers having end portions collected within the sheath and abutted against the light conductive rod, and having second ends;

a rear sight, comprising an upstanding leaf with a V-shaped groove therein secured to the barrel adjacent the breech end thereof;

the second ends of the first series of fibers being secured to the leaf at equidistantly spaced locations along said groove;

an elongated opaque second sheath extending from the first sheath;

a second series of light conductive fibers in said second sheath, having interior ends and exterior ends, and having the exterior ends disposed against the light conductive rod;

a forward sight mount, comprising an upstanding bracket secured to the muzzle end of the firearm; and

the second sheath being engaged in said bracket to expose the exterior ends of the second series of light conductive fibers, said ends being alignable with the groove of the rear sight.

2. A sighting assembly for a firearm, the firearm having a barrel with a munle end and a breech end and having a receiver, the sighting assembly comprising:

a casing mounted on the receiver having a light source therein, said light source being energizable to produce a shielded illumination;

an elongated, tubular, opaque extension projecting from the casing;

a light conductive rod mounted within the extension and engaged at one end thereof against the light source;

an enlarged opaque first sheath extending from the tubular extension;

a first series of light conductive fibers having first end portions collected within the first sheath and abutted against the light conductive rod, and having second ends;

a rear sight. comprising an upstanding leaf with a groove therein, secured to the barrel adjacent the breech end thereof;

the second ends of the first series of fibers being secured to the leaf at equidistantly spaced locations along said groove;

an elongated second sheath extending from the first sheath;

a second series of light conductive fibers in said second sheath, having exterior ends and interior ends, and having the exterior ends disposed against the light conductive rod;

a forward sight member secured to the firearm and including a bracket; and

the second sheath being engaged in the bracket to expose the interior ends of the second series of light conductive fibers, said ends being visually alignable with the groove of the rear sight.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US802277 *Jun 12, 1905Oct 17, 1905Josef Jan FricSight for guns.
US1931552 *Jul 15, 1931Oct 24, 1933Maris Harry BIlluminated telescope sight
DE665662C *Dec 8, 1936Jun 17, 1939Dr Alfred HennickeVorrichtung zum Zielen bei ungenuegender Beleuchtung
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3833799 *Dec 15, 1972Sep 3, 1974N AudetGun sight system for use under low ambient light conditions
US3945127 *Mar 27, 1974Mar 23, 1976Spencer Phillip GSighting apparatus
US3994597 *Dec 26, 1974Nov 30, 1976Calder William EOptical sight with variable illumination
US4070763 *Dec 3, 1976Jan 31, 1978The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyAiming/sighting device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification42/132, 43/17.5, 42/114, 362/577, 356/247
International ClassificationF41G1/00, F41G1/34
Cooperative ClassificationF41G1/345
European ClassificationF41G1/34B