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Publication numberUS3678923 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1972
Filing dateJun 11, 1970
Priority dateJun 11, 1970
Publication numberUS 3678923 A, US 3678923A, US-A-3678923, US3678923 A, US3678923A
InventorsNorman Oetinger
Original AssigneeAmerican Massage Sales And Mfg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pulsating vibratory massaging appliance
US 3678923 A
Abstract
A vibratory appliance such as a chair, mattress or pad adapted to be placed in contact with a person's body to provide an intermittent vibratory massaging action including at least one vibration producing device mounted on the appliance for imparting a vibratory motion thereto, and electro-mechanical control means for cyclically interrupting the vibratory motion so as to cause the vibratory appliance to produce an intermittent or pulsating vibratory motion.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Oetinger 1 1 July 25, 1972 s41 PULSATING VIBRATORY MASSAGING 3,335,717 8/1967 Monaco ..128/33 2,937,641 5/l960 Oetinger ..l28/33 APPLIANCE 7 Norman Oetinger, Buffalo, NY.

[ Inventor? Primary Examiner-L. W. Trapp [73] Assignee: American Massage Sales and Manufactur- A0mey Smmer webers Gastel ing Corporation, Silver Creek, NY.

[22] Filed June 11, 1970 [57] ABSTRACT [21] Appl 454l9 A vibratory appliance such as a chair, mattress or pad adapted to be placed in contact with a person's body to provide an in- 52 U.S. c1 ..12s/33 termittent vibratory massaging aotioninoluding a least one 51 1111.01. ..A6lh 1 00 vibration producing device mounted on the appliance for [58] Field of Search 128/32, 33, 34-36, parting a vibratory motion there n lectromechanical 128/242 control means for cyclically interrupting the vibratory motion so as to cause the vibratory appliance to produce an intermit- [56] References Cited tent or pulsating vibratory motion.

UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 Claims, 8 Drawing figures 2,893,380 7/1959 Walker et a1 ..l28/33 X CHAIR MATTRESS IO PAD j A 41 F 2 Patented July 25, 1972 3,678,923

3 Sheets-Sheet 2 6/ l/g? -27 I g I l 5 /55 58 53 Y I 56 6 l i I 6 I INVENTOR. NORMAN OETINGER ATTORNEYS Patented July 25, 1972 3,678,923

3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. NORMAN OETINGER ATTORNEYS PULSATING VIBRATORY MASSAGING APPLIANCE The present invention relates to vibratory appliances which produce a massaging action on the body and more particularly to appliances of this type which are capable of producing an intermittent pulsating vibration.

Vibratory appliances such as pads, mattresses, and chairs are well known in the art. These appliances produce a vibratory motion, and when they engage a person's body produce a massaging action thereon. In the past the vibratory motion was constant. If the vibratory motion produced by devices of the foregoing type is periodically interrupted at approximately the breathing rate, namely, between about 16 and 20 times per minute, an intermittent or pulsating vibratory motion is produced which can, in certain instances, assist the breathing of persons suffering respiratory ailments such as emphysema.

It is accordingly the object of the present invention to provide an improved vibratory appliance which is capable of producing an intermittent or pulsating vibratory motion. Other objects and attendant advantages of the present invention will readily be perceived hereafter.

The present invention relates to a vibratory appliance comprising a member adapted to be placed in contact with a portion of a portion of a persons body, vibration producing means mounted on said member for imparting a vibratory motion to said member to provide a massaging effect on a portion of a person's body in contact therewith, and electro-mechanical control means for cyclically interrupting said vibratory motion so as to cause said member to produce an intermittent or pulsating vibratory motion, such control means comprising an electrical source, and first and second circuits connected in parallel across the input and output of the source, such first circuit including in series a vibratory motor driving the vibration producing means and a normally closed, cam actuated interrupter switch, and such second circuit including a pulsator motor, and a cam driven by such pulsator motor for actuating the interrupter switch to periodically open the first circuit. The various aspects of the present invention will be more fully understood when the following portions of the specification are read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a vibratory appliance such as a chair incorporating a plurality of vibration producing devices;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the bottom of the chair of FIG. 1 showing the position of the pulsator assembly;

FIG. 3 is an electrical wiring diagram schematically illustrating how the circuit can be used to energizevarious vibratory appliances such as the chair of FIG. 1 having four vibration producing devices; the box spring of FIG. 7 having two vibration producing devices; or the pad of FIG. 8 having one vibration producing device;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2 and showing the broad details of construction of the pulsator assembly;

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken'substantially along line 55 of FIG. 4;

1 FIG. 6 is a cross sectional view taken substantially along line 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a box spring mounting a plurality of vibration producing devices and also showing a control unit associated therewith; and

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a pad mounting a vibration producing device and having a control unit attached thereto.

In FIG. 1 a vibratory appliance such as chair 10 is shown having sides 11 and 12, back 13, seat 14 and foot rest 15. This chair is of the type which can be moved to a reclining position as shown in FIG. I wherein the back 13 assumes a relatively horizontal attitude and foot rest 15 comes up into the position shown. When the chair is in an upright position, back 13 assumes a substantially vertical position, and foot rest 15 is retracted to a position at the front of the chair, as shown in FIG. 2. All of the foregoing structure and the mechanism for operating the chair are well known in the art and will not be described here in the interest of brevity.

Vibration producing devices 16, 17, 18 and 19 are mounted in the back, seat, and foot rest portions of the chair, as shown in FIG. 1. Devices 16, 17, 18 and 19 may be identical to each other and are mounted in such a manner as to impart a vibratory motion to the portion of the chair in which they are located. The exact number of vibration producing devices in each portion of the chair may be changed as desired. For example, if it is desired to put only one vibration producing device in the back of the chair and two in the seat, this can be done. The structure of vibration producing devices 16, 17, 18 and 19 and their manner of installation form no specific part of the present invention and therefore will not be described. However, these devices may be constructed in an identical manner to that described in US. Pat. No. 3,092,100 of N. Oetinger, dated June 4, 1963. The manner in which the vibration producing devices are mounted is shown in detail in the foregoing patent, and since it forms no part of the present invention it is deemed that a repetitive explanation of this structure is unnecessary. The subject matter of US. Pat. No. 3,092,100 is incorporated here by reference.

A control panel 20 is mounted on swinging door 21 in side 11 of the chair. Control panel'20 contains a number of controls including a timer unit switch 20' for setting the length of time of operation of the vibration producing devices 16-19, and rheostat knobs 16", 17", 18" and 19" for varying the intensity of vibratory motion produced by vibration producing devices 16, 17, 18 and 19, respectively.

In accordance with the present invention an arrangement is provided for cyclically deenergizing electric motors 26, 27, 28 and 29 which drive vibration producing devices 16, 17, 18 and 19, respectively, in order to produce a surge or pulse effect. In other words, the vibration produced by devices 16, 17, 18 and 19 is periodically interrupted by interrupting the flow of electric current thereto. These interruptions are made between 16 and 20 times per minute for an interval of about one-quarter to one-half of 1 second so as to approximate the normal breathing rate of an individual. The breathing cycle of a person is thus stimulated and this facilitates breathing of persons who are afflicted with respiratory ailments such as emphysema.

In order to achieve the foregoing, the electrical circuit shown in FIG. 3 includes leads 30 and 31 coupled to the upper input and lower output terminals of AC source 32. When it is desired to energize motors 26, 27, 28 and 29, it is merely required to set timer unit 22 by manipulating switch 20' to complete a first circuit across the input and output of source 32 through leads 31 and 37, first input and output of timer 22, lead 38, any of closed rheostats l6, 17', 18 or 19-, any of branch leads 42, 43, 44 or 45 associated with a closed rheostat, any of vibratory motors 26, 27, 28 or 29 associated with a closed rheostat, lead 41, normally closed microswitch 40, and leads 39 and 30. Timer unit 22, which may be of any conventional construction, may be set to give any desired length or period of operation, and when it times out the current flow between leads 37 and 38 will be terminated to thus deenergize any of the motors which were running. If it is desired that any one of motors 26, 27, 28 or 29 remain quiescent it is merely necessary to leave the appropriate rheostat switches open, as shown.

The foregoing mode of operation will cause vibration producing devices 16, 17, 18 and 19 to provide vibratory mo tion, the intensity of which is controlled by the setting of the rheostats 16, 17', 18' and 19, respectively. It is to be noted that the vibratory motion, as described at this point is uninterrupted and that the energization of motors 26-29 depends on the maintaining of interrupter microswitch 40 in its closed normal condition. However, in accordance with the present invention microswitch 40 is opened approximately 16 times per minute. This is effected by selectively energizing pulsator motor 43 by closing switch 23 to complete a second circuit in parallel with the above first circuit across the input and output of source 32 through leads 3] and 33, lead 34, switch 23, the second input and output of timer motor unit 22, lead '35, pulsator motor 43 and lead 30. When timer unit 22 times out,

the circuit will be opened between leads 34 and 35 to terminate the flow of current to motor 43. The energization of motor 43 will drive cam 48. As can be seen from FIGS. 4, and 6, cam 48 is mounted on shaft 49 which is secured to gear 50 in mesh with gear 51 which is mounted on motor shaft 52. Gears 50 and 51 are located within housing 53 and the complete pulsator motor assembly consisting of the parts shown in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6 is mounted within a housing 54 which is secured to frame 54 of chair as shown in FIG. 2.

Cam 48 includes a plurality of equidistantly spaced lobes 55 (FIG. 5) separated by valleys 56. The lobes and valleys are engaged by cam follower arm 57 which has a roller 58 at the end thereof and is pivotaily secured to and forms a part of microswitch 40. When arm 57 is in the position shown in FIG. 5, it depresses switch 59 to complete a circuit between leads 39 and 41 (FIG..3). When roller 58 is in any of the valleys 56 arm 57 is in a position where switch 59 will be open to break the circuit between leads 39 and 41. Cam 48 is driven at approximately 4 revolutions per minute so as to cause 16 interruptions per minute through microswitch 40 which in turn causes the vibration of vibratory devices l6, 17, 18 and 19 to be interrupted approximately 16 times per minute, which is the normal breathing rate of a person. Actually, the motors 26-29 do not stop when they are interrupted. They merely pause to produce a pulsating effect which is combined with the vibratory effect. It will be appreciated that a cam with different number of lobes can be used to vary the interruption rate. For energization of the vibration producing devices in an uninterrupted manner after pulsator motor 43 has been in operation, switch 23 is opened immediately after the vibration starts after an interruption, to cause the cam follower arm 57 to be held on a cam lobe 55 rather than to come to rest in a valley 56.

The above described circuit can also be applied to a vibratory appliance such as box spring 60 (FIG. 7) which mounts vibration producing devices 61 and 62 thereon in the manner described in detail in the above mentioned U.S. Pat. No. 3,092,100. Box spring 60 may include motors such as 26 and 27 shown in FIG. 3. In the box spring circuit motors 28 and 29 and their associated circuitry are removed. Essentially, all of the above described circuit elements of FIG. 3 may be enclosed in a control box 63 which has a pulsator unit switch 23', rheostat switch 26 and timer unit switch 20", which are analogous to elements 23, 26 and 20', respectively, of the cir cuit of FIG. 3. The circuit in control unit 63 is identical to that shown in FIG. 3, except that only two motors are used. It will be appreciated that if desired, a separate rheostat can be applied for each vibration producing device 61 and 62.

In FIG. 8 another modification of the present invention is shown wherein the vibration producing device 68 is mounted on a pad 69 for imparting vibration thereto, pad 69 being of the type which can be applied to any part of the body, as desired. The specific structure for mounting the vibration producing device 68 on pad 69 is shown in US. Pat. No.

3,092,099 which isincorporated herein by reference but will, not be further treated since it forms no part of the present invention. In accordance with the present invention a control unit 63 is provided for selectively energizing a motor such as 26 (FIG. 3) which is associated with device 68. In the arrangement shown in FIG. 8 motors 27, 28 and 29 of FIG. 3 and their control means for cyclically interrupting said vibratory motion so as to cause said member to produce an intermittent vibratory motion, said controlmeans comprising an electrical source, and first and second circuits connected in parallel across the input and output of said source, said first circuit including in series a vibratory motor driving said vibration producing means and a normally closed, cam actuated interrupter switch, and said second circuit including a pulsator motor, andv a cam driven by said pulsator motor for actuating said interrupter switch to periodically open said first circuit.

2. The vibratory appliance of claim 1 including a timer having in said first circuit an input and output in series with said vibratory motor and controlling the period during which current flows to said first circuit, and wherein said first circuit includes in series with said vibratory motor a rheostat switch controlling not only the energization and deenergization of said vibratory motor but also the intensity of vibration produced thereby 3. The vibratory appliance of claim 2 including at least two of said vibration producing means, wherein said first circuit includes at least two parallel branches in series with said timer and interrupter switch, and each branch includes said rheostat switch and said vibratory motor driving the corresponding one of said vibration producing means.

4. The vibratory appliance of claim 1 including a timer having in said second circuit an input and output in series with said pulsator motor, and controlling the period during which current flows to said second circuit, and said second circuit includes in series with said pulsator motor a selectively operable on-off switch controlling the energization and deenergization of said pulsator motor.

5. The vibratory appliance of claim 1 including a timer having in said first circuit a first input and output in series'with said vibratory motor, having in said second circuit a second input and output in series with said pulsator motor, and controlling the period during which current flows to said first and second circuits, and wherein said first circuit includes in series with said vibratory motor a rheostat switch controlling not only the energization and deenergization of said vibratory motor but also the intensity of vibration produced thereby, and said second circuit includes in series with said pulsator motor a selectively operable on-off switch controlling the energization and deenergization of said pulsator motor.

6. The vibratory appliance of claim 5 including at least two of said vibration producing means, and wherein said first circuit includes at least two parallel branches in series with said first input and output of said timer and said interrupter switch, and each branch includes said rheostat switch and said vibratory motor driving the corresponding one of said vibration producing means.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2893380 *Jun 29, 1956Jul 7, 1959Cecil Invest CompanyMassage and exercise machine
US2937641 *Sep 23, 1957May 24, 1960Owen K MurphyUpholstered massage furniture
US3335717 *Mar 4, 1966Aug 15, 1967Monaco Anthony JVariable intensity massaging device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4203098 *Sep 18, 1978May 13, 1980Muncheryan Hrand MDevice for preventing dozing while driving a car
US5137016 *Feb 28, 1991Aug 11, 1992Kabushiki Kaisha Japan HealthAutomatic multifunction massager for chair
US5188096 *Mar 7, 1991Feb 23, 1993Yoo Young YoonMassage apparatus
US5437608 *Oct 19, 1992Aug 1, 1995Jb Research, Inc.Massaging apparatus with sequential vibration
US5836645 *Nov 21, 1996Nov 17, 1998Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd.Lounger-type massage machine
US5868687 *Jun 13, 1997Feb 9, 1999Global Upholstery CompanyChair equipped with massage apparatus
US6077238 *Feb 29, 1996Jun 20, 2000Homedics, Inc.Massaging apparatus with micro controller using pulse width modulated signals
US6505361 *Apr 27, 1999Jan 14, 2003Ken HayashibaraVibration generator
US6676615Sep 19, 2001Jan 13, 2004Omega Patents, L.L.C.Wireless massage device for a vehicle and associated methods
US6689029Apr 12, 2002Feb 10, 2004Karl WakemanMedical aid and apparatus for enhancing sexual intimacy
US6708358 *Dec 29, 2000Mar 23, 2004Hill-Rom Services, Inc.Articulating bed frame
US20110054240 *Sep 3, 2009Mar 3, 2011Bender Eddie LInduced Relaxation And Therapeutic Apparatus And Method
DE3326801A1 *Jul 26, 1983Feb 14, 1985Friedrich HornExtension device
EP0684031A1 *May 27, 1994Nov 29, 1995Hsiao-Bin SuMassage cushion for sitting or lying on
WO1997031607A1 *Feb 28, 1997Sep 4, 1997Homedics IncMassaging apparatus
WO1997039648A1 *Apr 23, 1997Oct 30, 1997Argelas DanielHair care and hydrotherapy apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/48, 601/58, 601/57
International ClassificationA61H23/02, A61H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2201/0138, A61H2201/0149, A61H2023/0272, A61H2201/0142, A61H2023/0281, A61H2201/5007