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Publication numberUS3680271 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1972
Filing dateMar 11, 1970
Priority dateMar 11, 1970
Publication numberUS 3680271 A, US 3680271A, US-A-3680271, US3680271 A, US3680271A
InventorsEric William Satchell
Original AssigneeGuest Keen & Nettlefolds Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wall frame structures
US 3680271 A
Abstract
A wall frame structure made up of upper and lower sheet steel plates between which extend a number of studs, the studs being connected to the plates, preferably at both ends by means which engage with co-operating means on the plate in such a manner that the two are secured together without the use of welding, nuts and bolts or rivetting.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Satchel] 51 Aug. 1,1972

[54] WALL FRAME STRUCTURES [72] Inventor:

New South Wales, Australia [73] Assignee: Guest Keen & Nettlefolds (Aust) Limited, Auburn, New South Wales, Australia 22 Filed: Marchll, 1970 21 App1.No.: 18,556

52 U.S.Cl. ..52/656,52/290,52/696, 287/189.36D

51 Int. Cl. ..E04c 2/38,F16b 5/07 [58] Field of Search...52/656, 690, DIG. 6, 696, 717,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 734,781 7/1903 Walker et a1. ..52/349 2,058,386 10/1936 Parsons ..52/349 2,114,388 4/1938 Killion ..52/241 2,267,477 12/1941 Siebenlist ..52/290 2,270,710 1/1942 Ring ..52/717 2,966,708 l/196l Freeman, Jr ..52/696 3,083,794 4/1963 Stovall, Jr. ..52/729 3,125,193 3/1964 Brown et a1 ..52/242 3,160,280 12/1964 Burch ..52/290 Eric William Satchel], Chatswood,'

3,204,382 9/1965 McGurn ..52/241 3,527,006 9/1970 Hanson ..52/241 2,906,482 9/1959 Flint ..287/l89.36 D

860,884 7/1907 Priddle ..287/189.36 A 3,221,846 12/1965 Brown et a1 ..287/189.36 A 1,028,829 6/1912 Reuterdahl ..287/l89.36 D 1,697,003 1/1929 Fink ..287/l89.36 D

236,755 l/1881 Banks ..52/656 3,050,160 8/1962 Chessey ..287/l89.36 D 2,690,336 9/1954 Belmont ..52/656 3,203,151 8/1965 Bransford, Jr. ..52/241 3,495,417 2/1970 Ratliff, Jr ..52/241 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS ltaly ..287/59 B Great Britain ..287/189.36 D

Primary Examiner-Frank L. Abbott Assistant Examiner-Leslie A. Braun Attorney-Michael S. Striker [5 7] ABSTRACT A wall frame structure made up of upper and lower sheet steel plates between which extend a number of studs, the studs being connected to the plates, preferably at both ends by means which engage with co-operating means on the plate in such a manner that the two are secured together without the use of welding, nuts and bolts or rivetting.

7 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAH: 1 m2 sum 1 or z l0 Iuvnm Elle 4161mm W {a PATENTEOAUG" H912 3.530.271

SHEET 2 [IF 2 Iii 150m Em 01am Jim 5 fly 04% MM.

WALL FRAME STRUCTURES The present invention relates to wall frame structures for domestic and commercial buildings and more particularly to steel wall frame structures.

The wall frame of a conventional timber framed building consists of upper and lower horizontal plates between which a plurality of studs extend. The frame also includes transverse connectors and heads for windows and doors. The object of the present invention is to provide a similar type of wall frame construction from steel and particularly to provide a construction in which the studs and plates are joined by means which avoids wholly or partially the necessity for welding or the provision of nuts and bolts or rivetting.

The invention consists in a steel wall frame structure consisting of upper and lower plates between which extend a plurality of studs, each plate and each stud being formed from sheet steel folded to a channel section, or

other suitable section, at least one end of each stud having means engaged with co-operating means on a plate such that the stud is firmly secured to the plate without use of welding, nuts and bolts or rivetting.

In a preferred form the invention consists in a steel wall frame structure consisting of upper and lower plates between which extend a plurality of studs, each plate and each stud being formed from sheet steel folded to a channel section or other suitable section, at least one plate being formed at intervals along its length with inwardly projecting lugs or the like and each stud being formed at at least one end with slots or the like, the said end or ends of each stud being, by deformation of either stud or plate, inserted into a plate at an appropriate point and the slots on the stud engaged with the lugs in the plate so that the end of the stud is secured to the plate, thereby forming a wall structure.

Sections other than channel sections suitable for the purposes of the invention include angle sections, box sections, sigma sections and zed sections.

In order that the invention may be better understood and put into practice a preferred form thereof is hereinafter described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a steel wall frame according to the invention,

FIG. 2 is a perspective view, to an enlarged scale of one end of a stud and portion of a plate illustrating the manner in which they are interconnected, and

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing portions of a stud and two transverse connectors illustrating the manner in which they are interconnected.

In the preferred form of the invention both plates and wall studs 11 of FIG. 1 are made from galvanized steel sheet of, for example, 18 gauge. Each plate 10 is formed by folding up sheet steel to form a channel section having an external width of 3% inches and a wall height of 1 inch, each wall having at its upper edge an inwardly directed flange 12 of a width of one-quarter inch. It should be emphasized that these dimensions and other dimensions given in this specification are by way of example only to assist in an understanding of the invention.

At regular intervals along the plate, for example 12 inch intervals, the internally extending flanges 12 are cut away to a width equal to the thickness of a stud 11, a portion 13 of the material of the flange is, however,

left in the middle of the space formed to constitute a lug for engagement with a corresponding slot 14 in a stud, details of which are described below. The formation of the cut away portions and lugs 13 is preferably carried out by punching out the sheet material before folding. The thickness of the studs 11 and thus the width of the cut away portions is preferably I 1 inches and the width of the lug 13% inches. The cut away portion on one flange 12 is formed immediately opposite a cut away portion on the other flange so that the end of the stud can be accommodated between them. Plates are manufactured to any desired lengths and the spacing of the cut away portions may be at any desired intervals.

Each stud 11 is formed from galvanized sheet steel in a manner similar to the plates and consists of a channel section of an internal width 3% inches and a depth of 1% inches. The walls of the section are plain without any inwardly directed flange. Studs are made to a standardized length to provide the normal ceiling height and are shaped at each end in the manner described below for engagement with a plate.

At each end the width of the stud is reduced to 3% inches for a depth of 1 5/16 inches so that the end of the stud will fit within the channel section of a plate, the walls 15 of the stud lying closely against the sides of the plate. At the inner end of the reduced portion at each side, is formed a slot 14 which is preferably eleven-sixteenths inch long and one-sixteenth inch wide which is preferably punched out before the metal is folded. The arrangement is such that the end of a stud may be inserted into a pair of cutaway portions on a plate and, by deformation of the plate to spread the sides apart, the stud may be introduced into the space between the inwardly projecting lugs 13 so that on allowing the plate to return to its normal configuration the lugs will engage the slots 14 to hold the stud firmly to the plate with the end of the stud resting on the base of the plate. In this manner a complete wall frame can be built up from two plates and an appropriate number of studs, quickly and without the use of tools.

Preferably the base of each stud between the walls is cut away at 16 to allow service pipes and wiring to be laid along the plates.

Inwardly inclined portions 20 are formed at the ends of the studs to facilitate their introduction between the sides of the plate.

Adjacent studs 11 are interconnected by means of transverse connectors 17 which fulfill the same function as their counterparts in a timber frame. In this case, however, the transverse connectors 17 are formed from galvanized sheet steel folded to a channel section in the same manner as the studs and plates and at each end the base of the transverse connector is provided with a pair of projecting T-shaped lugs 18, the height of the stem of the T being approximately equal to the thickness of the material of the stud. Each stud is provided at intervals with pairs of T-shaped slots 21 the width of the head of the slot being equal to the width of the head of the lug 18 on the transverse connector 17. The arrangement is such that the lugs 18 on a transverse connector 17 may be offered up to the slots 21 on a stud l 1 and passed through the heads of the slots. The transverse connector may then be allowed to drop so that the stem of the lug enters the stem of the slot and the transverse connector is thus held in contact with the stud and cannot be pulled away from it. The slots are preferably constructed so as to accommodate two transverse connectors one entering from each side of the stud. The end 22 of the transverse connector which is required to enter between the walls of a stud is made of a reduced width in a manner similar to the ends of the studs.

The slots 21 in each stud 11 described above are provided at suitable intervals throughout its length to accommodate not only transverse connectors but also heads, window frames and sills for doors and windows all of which may be constructed in a manner similar to the transverse connectors. The studs may be provided with 541 inch holes 23 at intervals for wall ties.

Suitable diagonal bracing for the wall frame may be provided in any convenient manner, the bracing being attached either by welding, by screws or by interengagement with slots in the studs.

Holes or knock-out sections may be provided in the plates or studs to enable service wires or pipes to pass through the structure or for the placing of ties for bricks or other wall materials.

A particular point to note in connection with the construction described is that the channel sections forming the studs, plates and transverse connectors are all of the same width so that each external side surface of the wall frame lies in a single plane thus facilitating the attachment of a wall cladding.

The embodiment of the invention described above is given by way of example only and may be varied within the scope of the invention as defined broadly above. It will be noted that the studs and plates are interengaged and secured together without welding, nuts and bolts or rivetting and while the means for interconnection illustrated in connection with the preferred embodiment it will readily be appreciated thatother means may be adapted within the scope of the invention.

While it is preferred that both ends of each stud should be secured to a plate by means engaging with co-operating means on the plate and without the use of welding, nuts and bolts and rivetting, the advantages of the invention may be obtained in part if one end only of each stud is engaged with a plate, for example, the lower plate, and the other end is secured to the other plate by means, for example, of nuts and bolts.

What I claim is:

l. A steel frame structure for buildings comprising upper and lower plate members each constituted by a U-shaped sheet metal channel having opposite wall portions, said plate members being arranged spaced from each other with said opposite wall portions on said two plate members respectively extending toward each other, at least one of said opposite wall portions of each plate member being formed at intervals along its length with inwardly projecting lugs; and a plurality of stud members, each constituted by a sheet metal channel extending between said plate members and each having opposite end portions respectively snugly received between said opposite wall portions of said plate members, each of said stud members having at each end thereof an inwardly inclined portion for engagement with the respective inwardly projecting lug on the plate member and spaced from said end an aperture for matin l r c ivin the res ectivel wh re during insertign of the ogposite nd portib ns of sa id stud members between said opposite wall portions of said plate members, the walls of at least one of said members are first resiliently deformed by engagement of said inclined portions with said projecting lugs so that after full insertion said lugs snap into the respective apertures to thereby lock the members to each other.

2. A steel frame structure as defined in claim 1, wherein both opposite wall portions of each plate member are formed along its length with inwardly pro- 25 jecting lugs.

3. A steel wall frame structure as in claim 1, including transverse connectors arranged at intervals between said stud members, each transverse connector being formed from sheet steel folded to a channel section and being connected at each end to a stud member.

4. A steel wall frame structure as in claim 3, wherein each nogging is provided at each end with a T-shaped lug and each stud member is provided at intervals with T-shaped slots, whereby the T-shaped lugs of said noggings are engaged with said slots of said studs and relative movement between said noggings and said stud members is prevented.

5. A steel wall frame structure as in claim 1, wherein said studs and plates are of the same width whereby each external side surface of the wall frame lies in a single plane whereby cladding can be easily mounted on the wall frame structure.

6. A steel wall frame structure as in claim 1, wherein said stud members are further provided with holes whereby essential services may pass through the wall frame structure.

7. A steel wall frame structure as in claim 1, wherein said stud members are further provided with a cut-out whereby essential services may pass through said wall frame structure.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/656.1, 52/696, 52/241, 52/290
International ClassificationE04B2/76, E04B2/58
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/7411, E04B2/58, E04B2/765
European ClassificationE04B2/76C3, E04B2/58