Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3680276 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1972
Filing dateMay 7, 1970
Priority dateSep 12, 1968
Publication numberUS 3680276 A, US 3680276A, US-A-3680276, US3680276 A, US3680276A
InventorsSmith Marvin G, Wright Gerald T
Original AssigneeHelmerich & Payne
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Strip
US 3680276 A
Abstract
An elongated elastomeric sealing member having a cross-section comprising generally parallel portions connected by a web portion and forming a channel therebetween. An elongated tongue portion projects from the web portion into the channel. The cross-section of the tongue portion comprises a head portion connected to the web portion by a shank portion. The head portion has oppositely directed lateral lips normally not engaging another member to which the sealing member is to be connected but adapted to engage the other member on a force being applied to said sealing member preventing both lateral movement and pull out of said sealing member relative to the other member.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Wright et al. 51 Aug. 1, 1972 [54] SEALING STRIP 3,068,617 12/1962 Borski ..52/403 X 3,336,707 8/1967 Horgan, Jr. 52/400 X [72] lnventors. Gerald T. Wright, Marvin G. Smith both of Houston 3,342,000 9/1967 Cnpe ..52/468 [73] Assignee: Helmerick & Payne, Inc., Houston, FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 645,857 7/1964 Belgium ..52/400 [22] I Filed: May 7, 1970 Related US. Application Data Primary Examiner-Alfred C. Perham Attorney-Murray Robinson, Ned L. Conley and David Alan Rose [63] Continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 759,314, Sept.

12, 1968, abandoned. [57] ABSTRACT [52] U.S.Cl. ..52/398, 49/489, 52/400, An l ng l tomeric sealing member having 21 52/627 cross-section comprising generally parallel portions 51 Int. Cl ..E06b 3/62, E04b 1/36 connected y a web Portion and forming a Channel 58 Field of Search ..52/208, 397-400, therebetween- An elongated tongue Portion p j 52 7 497 489, 498 from the web portion into the channel. The cross-section of the tongue portion comprises a head portion [56] References Cited connected to the web portion by a shank portion. The

head portion has oppositely directed lateral lips .nor- UNITED STATES PATENTS mally not engaging another member to which the sealing member is to be connected but adapted to engage g z the other member on a force being applied to said 0 man 489 sealing member preventing both lateral movement and 3 32:; Q 15 pull out of said sealing member relative to the other b I 2,847,731 8/1958 Hollander ..52/626 mem er 2,878,535 3/1959 Bush ..52/208 X 11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures /--v 7 I 32/7 l A 6a 67 5 6 2 ,III/ 7 '6 x 60 93 I 613a V 83 54 90 PATENTEDws'v 1912 Gera/a mamas wh /v LNVENTQR,

SEALING STRIP CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION The application is a continuation-in-part of our earlier filed co-pending application Ser. No. 759,314, filed on Sept. 12, 1968 and now abandoned.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention is related to seals. More specifically, it concerns seals suitable for mounting window glass in a window frame.

2. Description of the Prior Art There are several methods of installing glass in the window glazing art. Elastomeric connector strips have been developed and are commonly used for sealingly mounting and cushioning panels such as window glass in a frame or wall of a building. Many widely used seal designs utilize a generally H-shaped cross-section which provide oppositely disposed channels one of which sealingly engages the window glass and the other of which sealingly engages the surrounding window frame or wall.

Windows are often glazed with factory-produced panes consisting of two parallel sheets of glass separated by a thin dehydrated air space maintained by a tight seal around their edges. Because of the seal and the dehydrated air there is no condensation or accumulation of dirt within the air space. The heat loss through the window is substantially reduced during the winter, and the heat gain during the summer is correspondingly reduced.

Whether a window consists of a single sheet or a double sheet of glass it is important that the seal strip provide an effective seal against the elements. Furthermore, it is necessary that the seal sufficiently resist the windloads applied to the window area. If not, a high wind may cause the seal to roll-out and blow the window glass out of the frame.

In the past, the commonly used H-type gasket has limited the glass size used in windows. Larger glass sizes have created a roll-out problem. This is particularly true in double-glazed windows since the relative depth of the seal channels in relation to the gasket width is generally less than that of a single glass window. In fact, some city construction codes have limited the window size in building construction simply because the glazing seals of the past have been inadequate for larger sizes.

Furthermore, in the past, to withstand high windload velocities, it has been necessary to use glazing gaskets with small glass to gasket clearances and excessive lip seal clamping pressure. This has resulted in a high cost of labor for installing the units.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention involves an elongated elastomeric sealing member whose cross section comprises generally parallel portions connected by a web portion and forming a channel therebetween for sealingly engaging another member, characterized by an elongated tongue portion projecting from the web portion into non-engaging disposition the channels but adapted for engagement with the other member resisting lateral movement or pull out of the sealing member relative to the other member on a force being directed against the sealing member. One embodiment for window glazing uses is similar to a standard l-I-type seal but with the additional tongue element which increases its windload carrying capabilities and allows normal gasket to glass clearances making installation cheaper. In such a use the tongue is normally nonengagingly disposed in a channel formed in a window frame but is adapted to engage the frame under abnormal wind loads to create a positive locking action between the frame and gasket. This enables the gasket to resist pull out in the direction of the glass and gives greater resistance to lateral movement and roll.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a detailed cross-section of window construction using the standard I-I-type gasket of the past; and

FIG. 2 is a cross-section of window construction according to one embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring first to FIG. 1, a glass panel 1 comprising two parallel sheets of glass 2, 3 are shown mounted in a window frame 4 with a standard H-type seal 10 as used in the past. A spacer element 5 is mounted between the glass sheets 2, 3 and approximately six inch setting blocks 6 are provided at quarter points adjacent the glass panel bottom edges. Setting blocks 6, made of a material such as neoprene, eliminate point contact and point loading of the glass panel 1.

Seal 10, made of an elastomeric material such as neoprene, comprises a pair of generally parallel portions, formed by inner wings 11, 12 and outer wings l3, l4, and a web 15 forming the cross member of the H. Inner wings ll, 12 terminate at their inner edges in inwardly directed lips 17, 18 and form an inner channel in which the edge of glass panel 1 is disposed and sealingly engaged by lips 17, 18. Outer wings l3, l4 terminate at their inner edges inwardly directed lips 20, 21 and form an outer channel in which the edge of window frame 4 is disposed and sealingly engaged by lips 20, 21.

A wedge member 25, generally of a material harder than seal 10, is disposed in a longitudinal recess substantially along the axis of web 32. To install the window unit seal strip 10 is fitted around the inside edge of window frame 4 with wedge 25 removed. Then inner wing 12 is bent back so that panel 1 may be fitted into the inner channel of seal 10. The wedge strip 25 is then inserted into the recess provided therefor, forcing wings l2 and 14 toward panel 1 and frame 4 respectively so that lips ll, 12 sealingly engage panel 1 and lips l3, l4 sealingly engage frame 4.

This type seal has been effective under certain conditions. However, to withstand high windload velocities with large glass panels, excessive lip seal clamping pressures and small glass to gasket clearances are required resulting in increased labor cost. Even this may not prevent the seal lips from rolling out under high windloads for large glass panels.

Referring now to FIG. 2, a detailed cross section of a window installation according to a preferred embodiment of the invention is shown which eliminates or reduces the problems encountered with the commonly used seal of FIG. 1. As in FIG. 1, a glass panel 51 comprising two parallel sheets of glass 52, 53 are shown mounted in a window frame 54. However, a new and novel elastomeric connector seal 60 replaces the ordinary seal 10 of FIG. 1. Spacer element 55 and setting block 56 are similar to corresponding elements in FIG. 1

tions formed by inner wing 61, 62 and outer wings 63, 64, and a web 65 forming the cross member of the H. Inner wings 61, 62 terminate at their inner edges in inwardly directed lips 67, 68 and form an inner channel in which the edge of glass panel 51 is disposed and sealingly engaged by lip 67, 68. Outer wings 63, 64 terminate at their inner edges in inwardly directed lips 70, 71 and form an outer channel in which the edge of window frame 54 is disposed and sealingly engaged by lips 70, 71. In these respects seal 60 is similar to seal 10 of FIG. 1.

However, a new and important feature has been added to seal 60. A longitudinal tongue member 80, integrally formed with seal 60, is provided projecting outwardly from web 65 into the outer channel formed by wings 63, 64. The crosssection of tongue 80 is formed by a shank portion 81 and a head portion 82. Oppositely directed lateral lips 83, 84 are provided on head portion 82. The free end of said head portion 82 is wedge shaped for installation reasons.

There is an inwardly opening channel 90 around the inside edge of frame 54. Frame 54 is also provided with laterally directed flange or shoulder members 91, 92 so that channel 90 has a throat area 93 of a substantially reduced width. In the normal installed position, as shown in FIG. 2, tongue 80 is disposed in channel 90 with a small clearance 83 84,, between tongue lips 83, 84 and frame shoulders 91, 92. To provide such clearances 83,,, 84,, tongue shank 81 is of a length slightly greater than the thickness of shoulder members 91, 92. Tongue shank 81 is also of a width less than throat area 93 leaving a small amount of clearance between shank 81 and flange members. 91, 92. Although in the drawing the tips of lips 83, 84 appear to slightly engage the side walls of frame channel 90, this has no effect or function and is not considered an engagement. In fact, it could be made with a clearance between the tips and channel side walls.

Seal 60 is installed around the interior of frame 54in a manner similar to the installation of seal 10 of FIG. 1, with one exception. Tongue 80 must be inserted into channel 90. This may be accomplished by simply directing a force against web 65 opposite tongue 80. Tongue lips 83, 84 are forced against shank 81 as head 82 passes through throat area 93. The clearance provided between shank 81 and shoulders 91, 92 permit passage of the head 82 and folded back lips 83, 84. After passing through throat 93, lips 83, 84 spring outwardly to their position of engagement as shown in FIG. 2. This action is permitted by the clearances 83 84,, between lips 83, 84 and shoulders 91, 92. The installation of window panel 51 and wedge 75 are performed in a manner similar to that described with Seal 60 comprises a pair of generally parallel porreference to standard seal 10 in FIG. 1. The clearances 83 84,, and between'shank 81 and shoulders 91, 92 are important. In the normal load condition, neither the shank 81 nor lips 83, 84 engage shoulders 91, 92. If they did so they would very likely adversely affect the seal at lips 67, 68 and particularly at lips 70, 71, requiring higher manufacturing tolerances. It would also be expensive and very difficult if not impossible to install the seal by insertion of tongue through throat 93. However, when an abnormal wind load is experienced the lips 83, 84 and probably one side of shank 81 would engage shoulders 91, 92 preventing the seal 60 from rolling out and allowing glass panel 51 to be blown out.

Thus, an effective seal is obtained between glass panel 51, seal 60, and frame 54. In addition, tongue 80 interlocks into frame 54 providing a positive locking action between frame 54 and gasket seal 60 under high wind loads. The head 82 and lips 83, 84 enable the gasket 60 to resist pull out from force components in the direction of panel 51 and shank 81 gives gasket 60 greater resistance to lateral movement and roll. This improved design has greater windload carrying capabilities and normal lip seal clamping pressures and glass to gasket clearances. Thus, larger glass panel area are permitted with easier and less costly installation.

Although the preferred embodiment described herein has been explained in use with a double-glazed window, it can also be used for single sheet windows. Neither is it limited to building windows. It can be used for joining panels of any type which'require a sealing connection. Furthermore, the seal channel opposite the tongue could be eliminated and the sealing strip could be bonded on that side to a panel member or another tongue member could be provided in the opposite channel to provide interlocking connection between both panels or other type members to be joined.

Various embodiments of the invention are shown in the drawing and described in the specification, but many variations thereof will be apparent to those skilled in the art. It is not practical to show or describe all the variations included within the invention, and therefore the embodiments described should be considered illustrative only, and not limiting, the scope of the invention being as broad as is defined by the appended claims. The form of the claims and the specification, including the Abstract, is adopted solely for easier reading and understanding, and should not be considered in interpreting the scope of the invention claimed.

We claim:

1. A wall panel construction wherein a panel member is sealingly supported in a frame member by an elongated elastomeric sealing member having a generally H-shaped cross-section comprising generally parallel portions connected by a web portion and forming oppositely disposed inner and outer channels on either side of said web portion,

said inner channel sealingly engaging said panel member and said outer channel sealingly engaging said frame member,

said frame member having a channel therein opening toward said panel member through a reduced width throat entrance formed by laterally directed shoulder means,

said sealing member comprising an elongated tongue portion projecting from said web portion into said outer channel and insertable through said throat for nonengaging disposition within said frame member channel,

the cross-section of said tongue portion comprising a head portion connected to said web portion by a shank portion,

the width of said head portion being greater than the width of said throat entrance and the width of said shank portion being less than the width of said throat entrance.

2. Wall panel construction as set forth in claim 1 characterized in that said head portion is provided with oppositely directed lateral lips, there normally being a clearance between said lips and said shoulder means, said lips being adapted to engage said shoulder means to resist said pull out on a lateral force being directed against said panel member.

3. Wall panel construction as set forth in claim 2 characterized in that the clearance provided between said shank portion and said shoulder means is sufficient to permit passage of said head portion through said throat entrance into said frame channel on said lateral lips being forced against said shank portion.

4. Wall panel construction as set forth in claim 3 characterized in that the side of said head opposite said shank is wedge shaped in its non-deformed condition to wedgingly force said lips against said shank portion on said head being forced through said throat entrance, said lips being adapted to resume their natural position after passing through said throat entrance to engage said shoulder means.

5. A wall panel construction wherein a panel member is sealingly supported in a frame member by an elongated elastomeric sealing member having a generally H-shaped cross-section comprising generally parallel portions connected by a web portion and forming oppositely disposed inner and outer channels on either side of said web portion,

said inner channel sealingly engaging said panel member and said outer channel sealingly engaging said frame member,

said frame member having a channel therein opening toward said panel member through a reduced width throat entrance formed by laterally directed shoulder means,

said sealing member comprising an elongated tongue portion projecting from said web portion into said outer channel and insertable through said throat for engagement with said frame member channel resisting both lateral movement and pull out of said sealing member relative to said frame member,

the cross-section of said tongue portion comprising a head portion connected to said web portion by a shank portion,

the width of said head portion being greater than the width of said throat entrance and the width of said shank portion being less than the width of said throat entrance.

6. Wall panel construction as set forth in claim 5 characterized in that said head portion is provided with oppositely directed lateral lips and in that a clearance is provided between said shank portion and said shoulder means permitting passage of said head portion through said throat entrance into said frame channel on said lateral lips being forced against said shank portion.

7. Wall panel construction as set forth in claim 6 characterized in that the side of said head opposite said shank is wedge shaped in its natural position to wedgingly force said lips against said shank portion on said head being forced through said throat entrance, said lips being adapted to resume their natural position after passing through said throat entrance.

8. A wall panel construction wherein a panel member is sealingly supported in a frame member by an elongated elastomeric sealing member having a multichanneled body portion, comprising generally parallel portions connected by a web portion forming at least one of said channels,

one of said channels sealingly receiving said panel member, and

another of said channels sealingly receiving said frame member,

said frame member having a channel therein opening toward said web portion through a reduced width throat entrance formed by laterally directed shoulders,

said sealing member comprising an elongated tongue portion projecting from said webportion into said other channel and non-engagingly disposed within said frame member channel,

the cross-section of said tongue portion comprising a head portion connected to said web portion by a shank portion,

. the width of said head portion being greater than the width of said throat entrance and the width of said shank portion being less than the width of said throat entrance.

9. A wall panel construction according to claim 8 wherein said head portion is spaced away from said web portion a distance substantially greater than the thickness of said shoulders of said frame member whereby a clearance is normally provided between said head portion and said shoulders.

10. A wall panel construction according to claim 9 wherein said head portion comprises resilient projections extending outwardly from said shank portion,

said projections being collapsible against said shank portion,

said head portion being wedge-shaped in its uncollapsed position,

said shank portion having a thickness substantially less than the width of said throat entrance,

the combined thickness of said head portion in the collapsed position and of said shank portion being less than the width of said throat entrance, and

said head portion returning to its uncollapsed position after insertion to resist removal of said tongue portion from said frame member channel.

1 l. A wall panel construction comprising:

a panel member,

a frame member around said panel member, and

an elongated elastomeric sealing strip for sealing engatement between said panel member and said frame member,

said frame member having a channel therein with a reduced width throat entrance formed by laterally directed shoulders,

said sealing member comprising two generally parallel sides connected by a web, said sides and web forming an upper channel to support said panel member and a lower channel to engage said frame member,

saidsides each having laterally directed sealing lips on their ends projecting inwardly of said upper and lower channels to sealingly engage with said panel member and said frame member,

a longitudinal recess in one of said sides substantially along the axis of said web,

a wedge of a material harder than that of said sealing strip disposed in said longitudinal recess,

an elongated tongue projecting from said web into said lower channel, said tongue having a shank and a head,

said head comprising resilient projections extending outwardly from the end of said shank, said projections being collapsible against said shank, said head being wedge-shaped in its uncollapsed positron, said head being insertable through said throat entrance of said frame member into said frame channel, said head having a width substantially greater than the width of said throat entrance, the combined thickness of said head in the collapsed position and of said shank being less than the width of said throat entrance, 7 I said projections being spaced away from said web a distance substantially greater than the thickness of said shoulders of said frame, whereby a clearance. is normally provided between said projections and said shoulders.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1998791 *Jun 27, 1934Apr 23, 1935Goodrich Co B FSealing strip
US2478837 *Feb 6, 1947Aug 9, 1949Libbey Owens Ford Glass CoMultiple glass sheet glazing construction
US2692791 *Mar 22, 1952Oct 26, 1954Henry Walker CharlesSealing strip for ventilator windows
US2815105 *May 10, 1955Dec 3, 1957Rubber Glazing Patents LtdPanel edge mounting means
US2847731 *Dec 23, 1954Aug 19, 1958Pawling Rubber CorpFloor mat
US2878535 *Mar 17, 1955Mar 24, 1959Gen Motors CorpSealing strip
US3068617 *Jan 11, 1961Dec 18, 1962F H Maloney CompanyGlazing gasket
US3336707 *Dec 9, 1964Aug 22, 1967Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoStructural gasket curtain wall
US3342000 *Jan 3, 1966Sep 19, 1967United Aircraft CorpPanel mounting structure
BE645857A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3766698 *Aug 23, 1971Oct 23, 1973Standard Products CoMeans for preventing panel roll out in a panel mounting system
US3805470 *Oct 5, 1972Apr 23, 1974Brown Co DGlazing gasket assembly
US4094301 *Mar 19, 1976Jun 13, 1978Edward Fredrick SorensonSolar collector panel
US4835927 *Feb 19, 1987Jun 6, 1989The Standard Products CompanyPrefabricated glazing gasket
US5603192 *Apr 3, 1995Feb 18, 1997Advanced Equipment CorporationOperable wall panel mounting apparatus
US5735089 *May 10, 1996Apr 7, 1998Excel Industries IncorporatedSacrificial glazing for a window assembly
US5806256 *Mar 26, 1996Sep 15, 1998Byrne; John F.Modular glazing system
US7021006Jan 20, 2004Apr 4, 2006Transit Care, Inc.Quick release sacrificial shield for window assembly
US7080874Feb 18, 2005Jul 25, 2006Jerry FarrarQuick change window assembly
US7082736May 9, 2002Aug 1, 2006Transit Care, Inc.Process for retrofitting an existing bus window having rubber seals with metal members that define a retention space for a sacrificial member
US8028479 *Aug 13, 2008Oct 4, 2011Advanced Glazing Technologies Limited (Agtl)Interlocking structural glazing panels
US20040154228 *Jan 20, 2004Aug 12, 2004Farrar Jerry L.Quick release sacrificial shield for window assembly
US20090064608 *Aug 13, 2008Mar 12, 2009Advanced Glazing Technologies Limited (Agtl)Interlocking Structural Glazing Panels
EP0138109A2 *Sep 25, 1984Apr 24, 1985Saar-Gummiwerk GmbHGlazing profile for multi-glazed windows
EP0138109A3 *Sep 25, 1984Feb 5, 1986Saar-Gummiwerk GmbhGlazing profile for multi-glazed windows
EP0280465A1 *Feb 17, 1988Aug 31, 1988The Standard Products CompanyPrefabricated glazing gasket
EP0941880A3 *Jan 30, 1999Dec 12, 2001DaimlerChrysler AGSection for a car body
WO1988007617A1 *Mar 17, 1988Oct 6, 1988Libbey-Owens-Ford Co.Encapsulated glazing structure
WO1997036076A1 *Mar 20, 1997Oct 2, 1997Byrne John FModular glazing system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/204.593, 52/204.597, 49/489.1, 52/717.5
International ClassificationE06B3/58, E06B3/62
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2003/6226, E06B2003/6252, E06B3/6205, E06B2003/6223
European ClassificationE06B3/62B