Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3680277 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1972
Filing dateJul 16, 1970
Priority dateJul 16, 1970
Publication numberUS 3680277 A, US 3680277A, US-A-3680277, US3680277 A, US3680277A
InventorsMartin Charles H
Original AssigneeBrooke Hamilton J, Martin Charles H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arrangement for connecting concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs
US 3680277 A
Abstract
An arrangement for connecting members such as concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs together wherein the members are provided with opposed mating dovetail grooves when the members are positioned in end to end relationship. A hollow key member, the longitudinally extending surfaces of which are generally concave, is resilient or flexible and may be partially collapsed to fit within the mating dovetail grooves of the members to be interlocked together. The resiliency of the key member tends to expand it and thereby aid in retaining it in position as well as locking the members together.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Martin 51 Aug. 1, 1972 [S4] ARRANGEMENT FOR CONNECTING CONCRETE OR CLAY BRICKS, BLOCKS, PANELS, AND SLABS [72] Inventor: Charles H. Martin, Lafayette, La.

[73] Assignee: J. Brooke Hamilton, Lafayette, La.

a part interest [22] Filed: July 16, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 55,363

[52] US. Cl. ..52/438, 52/442, 52/586, 52/720 [51] Int. Cl ..E04c l/10 [58] Field of Search ..52/438, 442, 585, 586, 621, 52/720 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,423,695 7/1947 Falco ..52/582 X 3,430,404 3/1969 Muse ..52/585 175,796 4/1876 Wands ..52/438 X 2,107,418 2/1938 Keller ..52/621 X 2,225,612 12/1940 Allen ..52/586 2,863,185 12/1958 Riedi ..287/20.92 K

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,258,423 3/1961 France ..52/585 Primary Examiner-Alfred C. Perham AttorneyJack W. Hayden [57] ABSTRACT An arrangement for connecting members such as concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs together wherein the members are provided with opposed mating dovetail grooves when the members are positioned in end to end relationship. A hollow key member, the longitudinally extending surfaces of which are generally concave, is resilient or flexible and may be partially collapsed to fit within the mating dovetail grooves of the members to be interlocked together. The resiliency of the key member tends to expand it and thereby aid in retaining it in position as well as locking the members together.

3 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures ARRANGEMENT FOR CONNECTING CONCRETE OR CLAY BRICKS, BLOCKS, PANELS, AND SLABS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an arrangement for connecting members such as concrete or clay bricks, blocks, and the liketogether.

Some the prior art with which applicant is familiar is the patent to K. O. Knudsen, No. 3,296,758, issuedon Jan. 10, 1967. In this device, a solid wedge or key is employed in opposed grooves but an additional interlocking arrangement is provided in this patent for holding the adjacent rows in interlocked relationship.

The patent to J. Roe, No. 2,392,551., issued on Jan. 8, 1946 again shows a solid key, but such arrangement is not adaptable to concrete or clay brick structural members in use at the present time. The blocks of the Roe patent are not adapted to be made on a standard block machine, and, of course, it would be difficult to V align the hole in one row of blocks with the wedges to be employed therewith.

In the Frink U.S. Pat., No. 1,816,322, a solid key is again employed, and a block construction is shown which is not adapted to be formed on a standard block machine.

In the Shannon U.S. Pat., No. 2,158,732, an arrangement for aligning blocks is provided, but such arrangement is not contemplated for permanently retaining the blocks in position. It is contemplated that other means will be employed for holding the aligned blocks and interlocking them together.

i The Steuler U.S. Pat., No. 2,933,920, issued on Apr. 26, 1960, also shows a solid key adapted to be fitted in a groove, but where a solid key is employed, it can be appreciated that there must be at least some clearance between the key and the groove in order to fit the key in the groove, or the groove and key must be carefully formed or cut so they will fit together.

In the Sams U.S. Pat., No. 3,292,331, another solid key arrangement is employed which has the same objections as that previously noted with the Steuler patent.

From the foregoing, it can be appreciated that all of the prior art devices with which applicant is familiar do not employ a means for connecting members such as concrete or clay blocks, bricks, or panels and slabs together in a relatively easy .and uncomplicated manner. Also, the prior art does not appear to show an arrangement employing a hollow key which positions the structural members in both the vertical and horizontal position and retains or interlocks them together in a horizontal and vertical relationship.

It can be further appreciated that where solid keys are employed as illustrated by the prior art, or where specially cast units are required, additional time may be required to initially form the units as well as thereafter lay the units and also either the labor employed in laying the units must be trained or more skilled than that which is required in utilizing the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to an arrangement for interlocking concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs in a horizontal and vertical direction. More particularly, the present invention can be employed on concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs with relatively unskilled labor.

The present invention employs concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs in which is cast or cut a dovetail groove for receiving a hollow key. The hollow key may be of any suitable material such as metal, plastic, rubber, or other similar materials which will yield and may be flexed for insertion in thegrooves of adjacent blocks for locking them together, and which key, by reason of its resiliency, tends to expand and thereby lock the adjacent blocks together in a horizontaland vertical direction.

If desired, a projection can be provided on the key so that after inserting longitudinally of adjacent blocks, it

will project upwardly therefrom for engagement with the next row of blocks, bricks, or panels in the structure being formed.

An object of the present invention is to provide a relatively simple and economical arrangement for interlocking concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and

slabs in a horizontal and vertical direction to form a structure.

Still another object of the present invention is to use a hollow key which may be flexed and inserted within a groove to interlock structural members together.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Attention is first directed to FIG. 1 of the drawings wherein a plurality of members M is shown as being stacked to form a wall of a building or the like. The members M may be concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, or slabs.

of a preferred form of In FIG. 2, the members M are again shown in sec-' tional view with adjacent members M being represented at 10 and 11. It will be noted that their vertical edges abut as at 12 and 13 and there is either cast or cut in the ends of the blocks 10 and 11 along the edges 12 and I3 dovetail grooves 15 and 16.

In FIG. 3, the longitudinally extending hollow key member 20 is shown and may be formed of any suitable materials such as metal, plastic, or the like, which permits the hollow key member 20 to flex. As shown in FIG. 3, the key member 20 is provided with longitudinally extending side surfaces 21, 22, 23, and 25, all of which are of generally concave configuration extending longitudinally of the key member 20. It will be noted the surface 25 is split as shown at 26 longitudinally thereof which more readily accommodates flexing or collapsing of the hollow key member 20 to permit it to be inserted vertically within the mating dovetail grooves 15 and 16 formed in the abutting edges 12 and 13 of the blocks 10 and 11.

of the drawings. This enables the hollow key 20 to pro- 5 ject upwardly beyond the edge 30 of the row 31 of members M so that the next adjacent row 32 may be also engaged with the key member 20 and thereby lock the rows 32 and 31 together vertically and horizontally.

Since the key member 20 is hollow, it can be appreciated that it may be readily grasped and collapsed and the inherent resiliency thereof will tend to expand the key member 20 after it has been inserted in the mating dovetail grooves and 16 so as to aid in locking the adjacent blocks 10 and 11 together as well as the adjacent rows 31 and 32 of blocks M. Also, the generally longitudinally extending concave configuration of the key member 20 further accommodates the collapsing of the key member 20 to aid in the insertion thereof into the dovetail grooves 15 and 16, and also aids in the expansion thereof after it has been seated within the groove so as to aid in interlocking the blocks together. As shown in FIG. 1, the blocks are shown in a stack bond, that is, where the edges of the blocks are aligned horizontally and vertically. Under those circumstances where a running bond is employed either on concrete or clay, bricks, blocks, and panels, a dovetail groove may be formed on the center web of the bricks, blocks, and panels.

Where the invention is to be employed in a horizontal slab, the same method as that described hereinabove is employed except that the key member 20 is inserted within the slab when it is in a horizontal position in lieu of in a vertical position as shown in the drawing.

Under some circumstances, it may be desirable to provide additional bond between the blocks 10 and 11 and adjacent rows 31 and 32 as well as the row 33, and other rows forming the wall or structure. In such circumstances, cement or other grouting material may be employed and poured in the dovetail grooves and in the hollow key member 20 after it is positioned.

From the foregoing, it can be appreciated that the present invention provides an arrangement for laying concrete or clay, bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs in a manner more readily than that heretofore employed. The construction and arrangement of the interlocking means is such that it may be utilized by relatively unskilled labor, and after the blocks have been interlocked together, a suitable finishing surface material may be provided thereon. Additionally, the present arrangement eliminates the need for masonry reinforcement whose principle purpose at the present time is to aid in tying the concrete or clay bricks, blocks, panels, and slabs more tightly together.

The corner units have flush, plain ends. The dovetail groove is cast or cut in the side a distance from the end to provide a flush joint.

The foregoing disclosure and description of the invention are illustrative and explanatory thereof, and various changes in the size, shape, and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made within the scope of the appended claims What is claimed is: 1. An arrangement for securing members in end-toend abutting relationship wherein the members each have a vertically extending dovetail groove in their abutting ends comprising:

a. an elongated hollow key for fitting in the dovetail grooves in the abutting ends of the members to secure the members together, said key member:

1. having four longitudinally extending side surfaces, each of which is of generally concave configuration;

2. one of said side surfaces having a split extending longitudinally thereof;

3. projections formed on said one side surface on each side of and adjacent the split; and

said key member positionable within the dovetail grooves so that one of said projections engages the upper surface of one of the abutting members and the other of said projections engages the upper surface of the other of the abutting members. and with the longitudinal split coinciding with the juncture of the abutting ends of the members.

2. A joint arrangement comprising:

a. two members in end-to-end abutting relationship;

b. each of said members having along their abutting ends opposed, complemental, aligned, longitudinally extending slots of dovetail transverse crosssection;

c. an elongated, hollow key for fitting in the dovetail grooves in said abutting ends of said members to secure said members together, said key member:

1. having four longitudinally extending side surfaces, each of which is of generally concave configuration;

2. one of said side surfaces having a split extending longitudinally thereof;

3. projections formed on said one side surface on each side of and adjacent the split;

. said key member positionable within the dovetail grooves so that one of said projections engages the upper surface of one of said abutting members and the other of said projections engages the upper surface of the other of said abutting members, and with the longitudinal split coinciding with the juncture of the abutting ends of said members whereby said key member projects upwardly from said members;

e. an additional pair of members for resting on the 7 upper surface of said two members; and f. each of said additional members having along their abutting ends opposed, complemental, aligned, longitudinally extending slots of dovetail transverse cross-section for engaging with said upwardly projecting key member to secure said additional members in end-to-end abutting relationship and in abutting relationship with the upper surface of said two members and with the longitudinal split in said key member coinciding with the juncture of the abutting ends of said additional members.

3. The invention of claim 2 wherein said dovetail grooves and hollow key member are filled with concrete.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US175796 *Mar 4, 1876Apr 4, 1876 Improvement in wooden roofs
US2107418 *Nov 25, 1935Feb 8, 1938Bitting IncMeans for attaching wall panel units together
US2225612 *Jul 22, 1936Dec 24, 1940Allen Charles WStructural unit
US2423695 *Apr 26, 1944Jul 8, 1947Dextone CompanyBuilding structure
US2863185 *Feb 16, 1954Dec 9, 1958Arnold T RiediJoint construction including a fastener for securing two structural members together in edge-to-edge closely abutting relation
US3430404 *Mar 20, 1967Mar 4, 1969George B MuseApertured wall construction
FR1258423A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3780484 *Jun 23, 1971Dec 25, 1973G MuseUniversal blocks
US4304083 *Oct 23, 1979Dec 8, 1981H. H. Robertson CompanyAnchor element for panel joint
US4389829 *Dec 22, 1980Jun 28, 1983Murphy Wesley TMetal roof system
US5117596 *Jan 5, 1990Jun 2, 1992Wenger CorporationPortable dance floor
US5248226 *Jun 29, 1992Sep 28, 1993Rothbury Investments LimitedConnector for use in combination with blocks for wall structures or the like
US5901521 *Mar 10, 1997May 11, 1999Guy; John H.Apparatus for dimensionally uniform building construction using interlocking connectors
US6189282Jan 8, 1999Feb 20, 2001Building Works, Inc.Mortarless concrete block
US7406804 *Jul 18, 2002Aug 5, 2008Den Daas Gert JSystem of stackable blocks as well as block and a joining element of the system
US7610730 *Jun 22, 2005Nov 3, 2009O'connor DanielStacking masonry block system with locking starter device
US8800230Nov 6, 2013Aug 12, 2014Daniel O'ConnorStacking masonry block system with transition block and utility groove running therethrough
US20140013697 *Mar 8, 2012Jan 16, 2014Quadrosera CorporationClips for thin brick wall system
EP0117205A2 *Feb 16, 1984Aug 29, 1984Yves François Honoré GrosdoitMethod of mutually connecting prefabricated panels; connecting profile applicable for carrying out this method and accomplished connection
EP1078169A1 *May 11, 1999Feb 28, 2001Paul E. StiboltConnector for two drywall corner finishing devices
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/438, 52/745.21, 52/586.2, 52/442
International ClassificationE04B1/61, F16B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/08, E04B2002/0252, E04B1/6154, F16B5/0024, F16B5/002, F16B5/0052
European ClassificationF16B5/00A1C, F16B5/00A2E, F16B5/00A1D, E04B1/61D3C2, E04B2/08