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Publication numberUS3680567 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1972
Filing dateApr 28, 1971
Priority dateApr 28, 1971
Also published asCA927245A, CA927245A1, DE2221060A1, DE2221060B2
Publication numberUS 3680567 A, US 3680567A, US-A-3680567, US3680567 A, US3680567A
InventorsWilliam A Hansen
Original AssigneeWilliam A Hansen
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable tankless glass washer
US 3680567 A
Abstract
A portable tankless washing apparatus is described for washing glasses, dishes, ashtrays and other glassware, preferably automatically. The apparatus comprises a first compartment into which the glassware is introduced and subjected to a pressurized spray of wash solution derived from a rotatable spray head. A second compartment is secured to the first compartment and, in use, is intended to project into a conventional sink that has a drain and hot and cold water connections. The second compartment includes a sump which has outlet openings for selectively directing wash solution and rinse water to the sink and sink drain respectively. A level control device is provided within the sump to effect deflection of liquid in the manner desired, this device being operable in response to a difference in the level of wash solution in the sink. The sink serves as an integral part of wash washing apparatus during use, functioning as a holding tank for was solution. A submersible pump is supported in the second compartment and draws wash solution from the sink to supply the same to the spray head. It is preferable to provide a heater within said second compartment to maintain the wash solution at a predetermined temperature. It is also preferable to provide a control circuit which enables the the apparatus to function automatically through a wash cycle and a rinse cycle, with the addition of a wetting agent or sanitizing material being optional during the rinse cycle.
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United States Patent Hansen 1 [151 3,680,567 51 Aug. 1,1972

[54] PORTABLE TANKLESS GLASS WASHER [72] Inventor: William A. Hansen, 95 Ashland Ave., Winnipeg 13, Manitoba, Canada [22] Filed: April 28, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 138,262

[52] U.S. Cl ..134/57 D, 134/96, 134/103, 134/107,134/115 R [51] Int. Cl. ..B08b 3/02 [58] Field of Search ..l34/56 D, 57 D, 95, 96, 103, 134/107, 115 R, 115 G Primary Examiner-Robert L. Bleut ge Att0meyCushman, Darby & Cushman [57] ABSTRACT A portable tankless washing apparatus is described for washing glasses, dishes, ashtrays and other glassware, preferably automatically. The apparatus comprises a first compartment into which the glassware is introduced and subjected to a pressurized spray of wash solution derived from a rotatable spray head. A second compartment is secured to the first compartment and, in use, is intended to project into a conventional sink that has a drain and hot and cold water connections. The second compartment includes a sump which has outlet openings for selectively directing wash solution and rinse water to the sink and sink drain respectively. A level control device is provided within the sump to effect deflection of liquid in the manner desired, this device being operable in response to a difference in the level of wash solution in the sink. The sink serves as an integral part of wash washing apparatus during use, functioning as a holding tank for was solution. A submersible pump is supported in the second compartment and draws wash solution from the sink to supply the same to the spray head. It is preferable to provide a heater within said second compartment to maintain the wash solution at a predetermined temperature. It is also preferable to provide a control circuit which enables the the apparatus to function automatically through a wash cycle and a rinse cycle, with the addition of a wetting agent or sanitizing material being optional during the rinse cycle.

10 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures PATENTEDMJ: 1 I972 SHLH 1 [If 3 PATENTEDAUB H972 3,680,567

sum 30F 3 (I) GHQ:

PORTABLE TANKLESS GLASS WASHER This invention relates to a washing apparatus for glassware generally, and more particularly to a portable tankless glasswasher. Such a portable glasswasher has particular utility in a hotel beverage room, lounge, or similar location.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION Glass-washing equipment of the prior art is basically of two types. In one type, there is provided a threebasin sink wherein a set of brushes is placed in one of the basins and the other two basins are used for rinsing. Cleaning of the glasses is carried out in a manual operation. This operation can be improved by providing motorized brushes to assist in cleaning the glasses, however, in either case the glasses and an operators hands must be immersed in the water. That factor alone limits the temperature at which the water can be maintained as well as the strength of detergent or sanitizer which is used.

The second basic type of equipment is the self-contained mechanical glasswasher of which there are many variations. Such a machine usually provides for a wash and rinse cycle of a predetermined duration. In addition, this type of machine supplys solution for the cycles at a desired temperature and chemical concentration. Although this second type of machine is superior and preferred, experience has shown that the majority of small taverns and cocktail lounges, for example, do not have an automatic glasswasher. There are probably two basic reasons for this. Firstly, the capital cost of such an automatic glasswasher is high. Secondly, the installation of such an automatic machine means provid ing a significant floor area behind the bar in such an establishment since these machines are normally quite large. Problems of space are often paramount in most bars which are already crowded with equipment. Indeed, the only piece of equipment which is normally feasible to remove and be replaced by the new automatic glasswasher is the sink unit. Moreover, even though a bar may have an automatic glasswasher, a sink of some size is virtually a necessity in facilitating the usual housekeeping chores associated with such an operation. Hence, a proprietor would be reluctant to remove his sinks and even if he did, he must often invariably end up installing a smaller sink along with the automatic glass-washing machine.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention overcomes many of the problems associated with the prior art in this field. The apparatus described herein is relatively simple to operate and maintain. In brief, therefore, there is provided a portable washer unit for washing glasses and other glassware, and adapted to be set upon a conventional sink having suitable drain, and hot and cold water connections, the washer unit comprising: a first compartment having means to receive and support tray means for containing said glassware, having a spray head rotatably mounted therein to facilitate spraying wash solution onto the glassware to clean the same, and having outlet means for conveying the wash solution from said first compartment; and a second compartment secured to the first compartment and projecting into said sink during use, the second compartment containing a submersible pump for supplying said solution under pressure to the spray head, said sink serving to define a holding tank from which the pump draws wash solution. It is also to be noted that a sump housing is preferably provided containing a first and second discharge opening, and a level controlling trough pivotally supported in that sump housing and operative to selectively direct liquid to one of such openings. It is preferable to provide a spray head which generates its own driving force for rotation, and which is located below the tray means containing the glassware to be washed. In another preferred embodiment, the level controlling trough is directly connected to a float member which is buoyantly supported by, and serves to sense the level of wash solution in the sink. The first compartment will often contain a delay reservoir or tank for the wash solution, such solution being pumped to this delay tank from the sink prior to being conducted to the spray head. The volume of solution required to fill this reservoir is removed from the sink and causes a lowering of the level of wash solution therein. That lower level subsequently causes the divertor trough to be preset to return the wash solution from the first compartment back to the sink.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a portable, tankless washer unit that improves upon glasswashers in the prior art.

It is also an object of a preferred embodiment herein to provide an improved glasswasher which, during use, utilizes a conventional sink as a tank that is part of this glasswasher. The present apparatus is therefore readily removable from such a sink and requires a relatively small amount of surface area while either in operation or being stored.

These and other objects and features of this invention will become apparent from the detailed description below. Such a description should be read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings which illustrate by way of example only one preferred embodiment of the present washing apparatus.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front elevation view taken in perspective and showing schematically one embodiment of the present washing apparatus;

FIGS. 2 and 3 are rear and side elevation views, showing some of the structural detail of the apparatus of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is also a side elevation view taken in perspective to show one form of a level control device which is utilized in the apparatus of FIG. 1; and,

FIG. 5 is a schematic drawing illustrating one electrical control circuit which can be utilized in an automated form of the glasswasher of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS As mentioned earlier, the portable washer unit to be described herein is adapted for use in, for instance, a tavern or beverage room which already has a conventional sink with suitable drain, cold and hot water connections already installed. Hence, the present washer unit enables, say, an operator of a tavern or hotel beverage room, or even a homeowner or apartment landlord with a recreation room inhis home to utilize existing sinks that may already be installed. The present apparatus nevertheless gives that person a modern automatic glasswasher which can be used with strong detergents, coupled with high temperatures and liquid pressures, and regulated or controlled wash times and cycles provide sanitized and sparkling machine-washed glassware.

Turning now to the drawings, a preferred embodiment of the present washer unit is shown overall at as being installed in place on a counter or table 12 in which a conventional sink 14 is installed. This sink 14 has a drain l6 and hot and cold water connections (not shown) provided in a manner that is well known in the art.

The washer unit 10 is comprised of two compartments shown at and 50. The first compartment 20 is usually a box-like enclosure having side walls 21, end walls 22 and 23, and a top 24 and bottom 25. These walls 21-25 are normally made of stainless steel or other such material suitably secured together to form a washing compartment. As seen from the drawings, the front wall 23 is provided with an opening that can be closed and sealed by a suitable door 26 which in this case is hingedly supported at 27 from the front wall 23. A sliding door could also be used, or other such equivalent that is adapted to seal and close the opening. Internally of the first compartment 20, there is provided at least a pair of support rails 28 which are so constructed as to enable a suitable tray or basket to be received within the wash compartment and supported on such rails. These rails 28 will normally be welded or otherwise fixedly secured to the side walls 21. A selfdriving rotatable tray head 30 is mounted at 32 for rotation about a generally central axis. This spray head 30 is provided with a series of nozzle openings or orifices 33 which, in the embodiment shown here, face upwardly and cause a spray of wash solution to be directed at the glassware contained in the basket supported on side rails 28. It will be apparent to those skilled in this art that the spray head 30 could be rotatably supported from the top 24 of the compartment 20 and hence such an arrangement is to be considered as equivalent to the particular arrangement illustrated here.

Mounted on one of the side walls 21 in this instance is an enclosure 34 housing the electrical control circuit illustrated in FIG. 5, for providing automatic operation of this preferred embodiment. A timer 35 is adjustable to enable an operator to set the time duration for one or both of the wash and rinse cycles. A start or ON button is shown at 36. It is normal in devices such as the present washing apparatus 10 to provide a safety interlock associated with the door or closure member 26 which will automatically stop the operation of this apparatus upon an opening of the door while the machine IS on.

The bottom 25 of the compartment 20 is provided with an outlet 38 to which a sump 40 is fixedly secured either by welding or by means of screw fasteners coupled with a suitable sealing gasket. This sump 40 is provided with two discharge openings, 42 and 44. The opening 42 is connectable by means of a flexible hose element 45 to the sink drain 16. The second opening 44 opens into the second compartment 50. The second compartment has side walls 52 which are apertured as shown at 54 to enable liquid directed into this compartment to drain out into the sink 14. As noted previously, the sink 14 functions as the holding tank for wash solution shown at 56. As seen best in FIGS. 1 and 2, the second compartment 50 usually contains a submersible heater 58 and a submersible solution pump shown at 60. A thermostat 62 is normally preset and associated with the heater element 58. Preferably, that heater 58 is electrically operated, although other modes of obtaining an input of heat into the wash solution 56 could also be used. As seen from FIG. 5, this heater and thermostat 58 and 62 are connected to the main control circuit illustrated there.

The top and first compartment 20 also supports a delay tank or holding reservoir 64 for wash solution pumped from the sink 14 through a suitable conduit 65 (FIG. 2) to this tank. The delay tank 64 has a vacuum bleed valve 66 provided at the top thereof, and a check valve 68 is provided in an outlet conduit 69 which connects the tank 64 to the spray head 30 for fluid flow therebetween. A suitable Tee-coupling is provided in the outlet line 69, this tee being shown at 70. The tee 70 enables a supply line 72 to provide hot and/or cold water from the sink connections through the intermediary of a solenoid-operated valve 74. Also associated with this input line 72 is an injector 76. This injector 76 is conventional in construction and function, serving to enable a wetting agent or sanitizer to be introduced into the hot or cold rinse water supplied from the sink connection during the rinse cycle.

As best seen in FIGS.-3 and 4, the sump 40 is provided with a level control device shown overall at 80. This level control device comprises a water deflecting trough 82 that is pivotally supported upon an up-standing baffle or wall 83 provided on the bottom of the sump 40. The trough 82 has two open ends, one end being operatively associated with the first outlet opening 42, while the other end is associated with the second outlet opening 44. A connecting rod 84 is disposed in the second outlet opening 44, with one end of that rod being pivotally secured to the associated end of the trough 82. The opposite end of the connecting rod 84 is fixedly secured to a float member 86. That float member 86 is buoyantly supported by the wash solution 56 contained in the sink 14. During operation of the washing apparatus 10, the float member 86 serves to sense the level of wash solution 56 in the sink 14. It will be readily seen from FIG. 3 that a low level of wash solution 56 will cause pivoting of the trough 82 in a generally clockwise direction (as seen in that Figure) thus causing wash solution expelled from the wash compartment (compartment 20) to the aperture 38 to be deflected into the second compartment 50 and back to the sink l4. Whenever an excessively high level of wash solution 56 is detected by the float 86, the trough 82 is pivoted in a counterclockwise direction, thus enabling that trough to deflect liquid (normally rinse water) to the outlet opening 42 and subsequently to the sink drain 16.

To describe the operation of the washing apparatus 10, glassware such as glasses, small plates, ashtrays or the like is placed within a basket that is introduced into the wash compartment 20 through the door 26. The door is then closed and sealed shut. A cam-type of twostage timer 35 is then actuated. The first stage of this timer switch energizes the submersible pump 60 which then draws wash solution from the sink l4 (assumed now to contain such solution) and into the holding tank 64. That tank 64 is first filled before any pressurized solution is supplied to the spray head 30. This holding tank 64 which, for instance, may be of a volume of about 72 cubic inches, i.e., holding about one imperial quart of solution, soon fills. When full, the wash solution then passes through the check valve 68, the tee 70 and into the spray head 30. There, the pressurized wash solution is forced out through the nozzle openings 33 as jets of spray which cause the spray head to rotate. This provides a circular spray pattern throughout the wash compartment 20. The angle at which water or wash solution is forced from this spray head 30 provides its rotating motion.

Collecting a sizeable quantity of solution in the holding tank 64 prior to introducing that liquid to the spray head 30 serves to lower the level of wash solution in the sink 14 by a slight amount. This in turn causes a lowering of the float member 86 and a corresponding pivoting motion of the trough 82. At this point in time when wash solution is introduced into the wash compartment 20, the level control device 80 and specifically the trough 82 therein has been preset or prepositioned to return virtually all of the wash solution to the sink 14 (via the second discharge opening 44 and the perforated second compartment 50). At the end of the predetermined wash cycle, the timer switch 35 de-energizes the pump 60 and a several second delay takes place. During this delay the vacuum bleed valve 66 operates to allow air to enter the holding tank 64 and permits the washsolution to run back down through the pump and into the sink 14. This then raises the level of wash solution therein slightly and raises the float member 86. This float member 86 now positions the trough 82 in such a way that when the rinse cycle starts, rinse water derived through the input line 72 and open solenoid valve 74 will immediately be directed to that section of the sump 40 which contains the first discharge opening 42. Hence, this rinse water will immediately be drained through the hose 45 to the sink drain 16.

Referring to FIG. 5, the time switch 35 is comprised of a synchronous motor which drives two cams that in turn close and open two distinct circuits. When the knob on timer 35 is turned to the start position, the motor starts and cam number one closes the circuit between the power source and the submersible solution pump 60. This cam keeps this circuit engaged for a period of approximately 60 seconds, then opens the circuit thus shutting off the pump 60. As the synchronous motor continues its rotation, a dead period of about seconds follows allowing solution in the holding reservoir 64 to run back down to the sink 14. The second cam then closes a second circuit connecting the power source with the solenoid valve 74. This valve, on being energized opens and allows rinse water to flow into the machine for about 15 seconds. The cam then opens the circuit thus de-energizing and closing the solenoid valve 74. The synchronous motor then itself shuts off and to start the cycle again, the knob must be again turned to the start position.

The other circuit (shown in FIG. 5) is an independent circuit and is the heater section. When the heater switch 36 is closed, current flows through the thermostats indicator light 88, the thermostat 62 and the heater 58. When the water in the sink 14 is heated to the desired temperature, the thermostat senses this and opens the circuit thus de-energizing the heater 58 and indicator light 88.

Incoming fresh rinse water is directed through a Venturi-type of injector 76. By means of the injector 76, any desired sanitizer or wetting agent can be introduced into the rinse cycle. It will be noted that the check valve 68 will prevent any rinse water from entering the wash solution holding tank 64 and thus entering the sink 14.

It will clearly be seen that if at any time, for any reason, the level of wash solution in the sink l4 varies from that desired, the level control device 80 will function to direct wash or rinse water in the direction required to maintain that level at its predetermined position. After a rinse cycle has been completed, the cam timer de-energized solenoid valve 74 thus completing the cycle.

As noted earlier, it is preferable to include a heater 58 with thermostat 62 in the second compartment 50 for purposes of controlling the temperature of wash solution in the sink 144. Detergent will be introduced into a small basket in the door 26 and wash water on the first cycle will dissolve this detergent allowing it to flow down into the sink 14 through the level control device 80.

It should be noted that while the present description and drawings refer specifically to one preferred embodiment, numerous modifications will be apparent to those skilled in this art. It is intended that all modifications that will be obvious to persons in this art are to be encompassed within the spirit of this invention as defined by the claims below.

Iclaim:

l. A portable washer unit for washing glasses and other glassware, and adapted to be set upon a conventional sink having suitable drain, and hot and cold water connections, the washer unit comprising:

a first compartment having means to receive and support tray means for containing said glassware, having a spray head rotatably mounted therein to facilitate spraying wash solution over the glassware to clean the same, and having outlet means for conveying the wash solution from said first compartment; and

a second compartment secured to the first compartment and projecting into said sink during use, the second compartment containing a submersible pump for supplying said solution under pressure to the spray head, said sink serving to define a holding tank from which the pump draws wash solution.

2. The washer unit of claim 1, wherein the outlet means comprises a sump housing having a first discharge opening connectible to the sink drain and a second discharge opening for conveying liquid back to the sink for subsequent re-use, and including diverter means for selectively directing liquid to one of said openings.

3. The washer unit of claim 2, wherein said diverter means comprises a liquid level controlling trough pivotally supported in said sump housing and operatively connected to a float buoyantly supported by wash solution in said sink that is responsive to a change in level of said wash solution to direct liquid to one of said discharge openings.

4. The washer unit of claim 3, wherein the first compartment also includes a wash solution delay reservoir to which wash solution is pumped from the sink, prior to passing to the spray header; the solution required to fill said reservoir being removed from the sink causing a lowering of the level of solution therein and hence causing the trough to be preset to return wash solution from the first compartment back to the sink.

5. The washer unit of claim 2, wherein said second compartment also includes heater means for heating the wash solution prior to pumping the same to the spray head.

6. The washer unit of claim 2, wherein the spray head comprises a tubular element having spray openings aligned along one side to effect rotation thereof, said side being adjacent to and immediately below the tray means containing glassware to be washed.

7. A tankless washer unit for washing glasses and other glassware and adapted to be set upon a conventional sink having a drain and hot and cold water connections, the washer unit comprising:

a first compartment for receiving and supporting tray means containing the glassware to be washed, and including a spray head and a reservoir for wash solution connected thereto, and also including support means for rotatably mounting the spray head to enable spraying said solution onto, the glassware and outlet means for conveying wash solution from said first compartment; and

a second compartment secured to the first compartment and projecting, during use, into the sink, the latter functioning at that time as a holding tank from which wash solution is drawn, the second compartment supporting a submersible pump which pumps wash solution from the sink to said reservoir and subsequently through the spray head and under pressure onto the glassware in said first compartment, and also supporting diverter means, said outlet means including a sump having first and second discharge openings with the diverter means being operative to selectively divert wash solution and rinse water to one of said discharge openings and hence to one of the sink drain, and sink.

8. The washer unit of claim 7, wherein the diverter means comprises a liquid deflecting trough having a float member connected thereto, the float member being buoyantly supported by, and serving to sense, the level of wash solution in said sink.

9. The washer unit of claim 7, wherein control means are provided for enabling the washer unit to operate through a wash cycle and then a rinse cycle, with wash water draining back to said sink after completion of the wash cycle causing a momentary initial rise in the level of wash solution in said sink, and causing the diverter subsequently to be pivotally moved in response to said higher level to direct rinse water to said sink drain.

10. The washer unit of claim 9, wherein the control means further includes means for adding one of a wetting and sanitizing agent to the rinse water.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3822729 *Sep 10, 1971Jul 9, 1974Rochette GAutomatic bars
US3863657 *May 23, 1973Feb 4, 1975Willard IrvingDishwasher and sink combination
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Classifications
U.S. Classification134/57.00D, 134/107, 134/115.00R, 134/96.1, 134/103.1
International ClassificationA47L15/00, A47L15/23
Cooperative ClassificationA47L15/0086, A47L15/0065, A47L15/0089
European ClassificationA47L15/00D, A47L15/00J, A47L15/00G