Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3680820 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1972
Filing dateJul 22, 1970
Priority dateJul 22, 1970
Publication numberUS 3680820 A, US 3680820A, US-A-3680820, US3680820 A, US3680820A
InventorsGracie John D
Original AssigneeGracie John D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Receptacle for stringed musical instrument
US 3680820 A
Abstract
A receptacle for a stringed musical instrument consisting of horizontally spaced restraining fingers having portions spaced outwardly from a support surface by a distance greater than the width of the instrument and a contact point on said surface positioned above said restraining fingers, and a wedge member angled outwardly from said surface below said fingers to cause the instrument to move outwardly against the fingers and rearwardly against the contact point when inserted downwardly between said fingers.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

limited States Patent Gracie [151 3,680,820 [451 'Aug. 1, 1972 [54] RECEPTACLE FOR STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT Inventor: John D. Gracie, 7013 Pomelo Drive,

Canoga Park, Calif. 91304 Filed: July 22, 1970 Appl. No.: 57,039

US. Cl ..248/3l4 Int. Cl. ..A47j 7/00 Field of Search ..24 8/309, 311, 314 TD; 211/50,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 7/1950 Greer ..2l1/50 2,662,719 12/1953 Hammond ..248/3l4 2,992,805 7/1961 Weldon ..248/309 UX Primary Examiner-William H. Schultz [5 7] ABSTRACT A receptacle for a stringed musical instrument consisting of horizontally spaced restraining fingers having portions spaced outwardly from a support surface by a distance greater than the width of the instrument and a contact point on said surface positioned above said restraining fingers, and a wedge member angled outwardly from said surface below said fingers to cause the instrument to move outwardly against the fingers and rearwardly against the contact point when inserted downwardly betweensaid fingers.

3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures ///////////////l l/l/l/ l/l/l/l PATENTEDAus H972 3.680.820

RECEPTACLE FOR STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENT A player of a stringed musical instrument, such as a guitar, usually keeps his instrument in the case or leaves it propped against the wall or lying on some piece of furniture. While stored in the case, the guitar is not readily available for use. When propped against the wall or laying on a shelf or piece of furniture, the instrument is exposed to dropping or bumping which may damage or mar the instrument.

Shops currently display instruments on shelvesor hang them from the neck of the instrument from wallmounted hooks or the instruments are propped on legs which incline the instrument about 20 from vertical. None of these devices holds the instrument securely. When the instrument is hung by a hook, it is up and out of the way but attachment to the hook is difficult because the hooks are usually above the head level to get the sound box high enough to be out of range of bumps. Also, there is a danger of bumping the tuning pins, thereby damaging them or getting the instrument out of tune. Floor racks have a disadvantage of requiring a relatively large amount of floor space. Because the instrument is tilted to keep it in a stable position in the floor rack, its plane profile is much larger than an instrument held in approximate vertical position. Also floor racks expose the entire instrument to bumps and since the instrument is loosely held, it is subject to possible toppling or overturning when bumped.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention provides a receptacle for securely storing the instrument away from exposure to bumps and scratches while not in use. The receptacle is preferably attached to a wall or other structure at a location above the floor so as to reduce the possibility of damage to the instrument. Also, while the instrument is held in the receptacle, it is continuously accessible and readily available so that the player will be inclined to use it more often. The device is particularly useful in music shops where numerous instruments are displayed since the instruments can be easily inserted into and removed from the receptacle and does not take up floor space. The present device is designed to accommodate standard guitars, the sound boxes of which range slightly in thickness and width at the widest point. The receptacle accommodates the full range of size variation for standard instruments, and holds the instrument firmly while providing for easy insertion and removal of the instrument.

A wedge is located below a pair of spaced retaining fingers to move the lower, bottom edge of the sound box outwardly and downwardly until the top surface of the sound box engages the restraining fingers. At the same time, the wedge moves the top of the sound box rearwardly until the bottom surface engages a contact point. No further support of the instrumentis necessary. To store the instrument, it is only necessary to lower the sound box within the space defined by the fingers and it will automatically assume the above described storage position.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a receptacle incorporating the invention with the instrument removed.

FIG. 2 is an elevational view of the receptacle with the instrument in place.

FIG. 3 is a side elevation along line 3--3 of FIG. 2.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT For purpose of illustration only, the invention is shown as comprising a frame having a member 11 and two horizontal arms 12 and 14, extending from opposite sides of member 11. The outer surface of the frame provides the mounting surface for the components of the invention. The upper end 11a of member 11 carries a contact element 15 and the lower end 11b is bent outwardly from the plane of the frame at about 25 to form a wedge which can contact the back bottom edge of the sound box. Two restraining fingers 18 and 19 have one leg 20 attached to the back of horizontal members 12 and 14, respectively, by suitable screw 21 and the other legs form restraining finger portions 22 and 23, respectively, which are spaced outwardly from the horizontal arms and project inwardly substantially parallel to the arms towards one another. The bottom portions 18a and 19a of fingers l8 and 19, respectively, have a length which is greater than the width of wall 24 of the musical instrument to be received.

In use, the sound box 25 of the instrument is lowered substantially vertically downwardly between the fingers l8 and 19 until the inside bottom edge 26 at the bottom 27 engages the wedge surface 11b. Thereafter, the lower portion of the sound box will be moved downwardly and outwardly by the wedge 11b until the top surface 28 of the sound box engages the finger portions 22 and 23. At the same time, the bottom surface 30 will engage the contact element 15 near the top of the sound box. Thereafter, the instrument will be securely held by the receptacle with the neck 31 of the instrument extending upwardly from the sound box. The two restraining fingers l8 and 19 can be fabricated of inch by A inch mild steel straps attached to the horizontal members, and the finger portions 22 and 23, contact element 15 and wedge 11b can be felt covered to protect the sound box. The contact element serves to protect the bottom surface of the instrument from the mounting surface of the frame. The complete device can be secured to the wall by the screws 21.

It is understood that the restraining unit can be fabricated by attaching the restraining fingers, the wedge and the contact element directly to a wall surface rather than to a unitary frame. Also, while the invention has been described as sized for guitars, it also can be used for other portable stringed musical instruments such as violins, banjos, mandolins, violas and bass violas. The device employs the force of gravity to keep the sound box in contact with the restraining fingets, the wedge and the contact point. Also, if a restraining clip were utilized to hold the sound box in contact with the above described components, then the unit could be employed to mount the instrument in a horizontal or inverted attitude.

In general, the unit employs the wedge in contact with the back edge 26 of the sound box to bring the top surface of the sound box into contact with the two restraining finger portions and the bottom surface in contact with the upper contact element as the instrument is inserted, and the insertion and retention of the instrument is aided by the gravitational force on the instrument.

What is claimed is:

I. In combination with a stringed instrument having a sound box, a receptacle for mounting said sound box to a mounting surface, said sound box having top and bottom surfaces and a wall thickness,

two restraining fingers horizontally spaced apart and connected with said mounting surface,

a wedge member located between and below said fingers and attached to said mounting surface, said wedge member projecting downwardly from a location below said fingers and outwardly away from said surface, and

a contact element located between and above said fingers and attached to said mounting surface, said restraining fingers having portions substantially parallel to and spaced from said mounting surface by an amount greater than said wall thickness, and engaging only the opposite edge portions of said top surface,

said sound box being lowered substantially vertically downwardly between said fingers and against said wedge, said wedge thereafter moving said top surface downwardly and outwardly into engagement with said finger portions and moving said bottom surface rearwardly against said contact point thereby placing the force of gravity at an angle to the downwardly and outwardly directed plane of said instrument, said contact point projecting slightly outwardly from said surface only by an amount required to hold said bottom surface away from said mounting surface, said sound box being thereafter held in slightly backwardly tilted position by the force of gravitation.

2. A receptacle as defined in claim 1 wherein said mounting surface comprises a frame having a vertically extending member and horizontal arms extending to both sides of said member, said wedge comprising the lower end of said member and said contact point being located near the upper end of said member, said restraining fingers being attached to said horizontal arms.

3. A receptacle as defined in claim 1 wherein said wedge member makes an angle of about 25 with said surface.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2513474 *Nov 18, 1946Jul 4, 1950Greer Charles LBag holding and dispensing rack
US2662719 *Jan 7, 1948Dec 15, 1953Joseph HammondBarber's clipper holder
US2992805 *Jan 13, 1960Jul 18, 1961Weldon Francis EWall bracket for electric shavers
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4159092 *Mar 31, 1978Jun 26, 1979D & J ProductsSupport for musical instruments
US4379541 *Jun 24, 1980Apr 12, 1983Harkness Donald MHolder for a container
US4582282 *Aug 22, 1983Apr 15, 1986Gracie John DSupporting stand for a stringed musical instrument
US4878585 *Dec 9, 1987Nov 7, 1989Orestano Andrew JSportboard wall-display safety-hanger fixture
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/314, 984/257
International ClassificationG10G5/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10G5/00
European ClassificationG10G5/00
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 18, 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: GRACIE STANDS, LLC, MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:GRACIE, JOHN;REEL/FRAME:027075/0669
Effective date: 20111005