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Publication numberUS3680865 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 1, 1972
Filing dateMar 9, 1970
Priority dateMar 9, 1970
Publication numberUS 3680865 A, US 3680865A, US-A-3680865, US3680865 A, US3680865A
InventorsGrover M Davis
Original AssigneeGrover M Davis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game board with magnetic game pieces
US 3680865 A
Abstract
A game construction played on a game board having alternate paths of movement for the game pieces wherein the game pieces each include an axial center with oppositely disposed vertically arranged N-S magnets 180 DEG apart such that when one game piece moves over another game piece capture or repulsion between the game pieces will occur depending on the orientation of the game pieces. The dice is used to indicate the number of positions each player may move during each turn and the player may turn his game piece a quarter or a half of a turn as a part of his move to give him proper orientation to capture his oppnent's game piece. The game pieces may be of any shape and may have visual identification means to indicate magnet orientation and location. The game may be played on game boards of a variety of designs including a checkers type board or a space station board wherein a center earth launching station is provided for a starting point for the game pieces in moving along launching paths intersecting orbital paths about the earth starting station.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

[451 Aug. 1, 1972 1 GAME BOARD WITH MAGNETIC GAME PIECES [72] Inventor: Grover M. Davis, 502 Second Ave.,

Audubon, Iowa 50025 22 Filed: March 9, 1970 21 Appl.No.: 17,541

52 us. (:1 ..273/134 AE,

273/131 AD, 273/137 AE, 273/134 AA I [51] Int. Cl; ..A631 3/02 [58] Field of Search.....273/131 A, 131 AD, 134 AB, 273/135 AX, 136 B, 137 AX, 134 AA, 1 M;

I ATENTS OR APPLICATIQNS 1,049,571 11/1966 Great Britain ..273/137 AX uzuiz Z. Cdpfure Pas flan Pow wl'an I? f f 62- v E 60 Fejep f/on 62 Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Marvin Siskind Attorney-Zarley, McKee & Thomte [5 7] ABSTRACT A game construction played on a game board having alternate paths of movement for the game pieces wherein the game pieces each include an axial center with oppositely disposed vertically? arranged N-S mag- I nets 180 apart such that when one game piece moves over another game piece capture or repulsion between the game pieces will occur depending on the orientation of the game pieces. The dice is used to indicate the number of positions each player may move during each turn and the player may turn his game piece a quarter or a half of a turn as a part of his move to give him proper orientation to capture his oppnents game piece. The game pieces may be of any shape and may have visual identification means to indicate magnet orientation and location. The game may be played on game boards of a variety of designs including a checkers type board or a space station board wherein a center earth launching station is provided for a starting point for the game pieces in moving along launching paths intersecting orbital paths about the earth starting station.

10 Claims, 1 Drawing Figures There have been many games involving playing pieces available heretofore. However, the game of this invention involves the playing pieces having the capability of capturing the playing pieces of the opposing player wherein upon all playing pieces being controlled by one player the game is completed. The playing pieces each include an axial center with diametrically oppositely disposed N-S magnetic elements. The playing pieces may be circular in shape such as a planetary station for a space station game or square in shape with the magnets in the corners fora checkers type game. The variations of the playing boards and the shape of the playing pieces isinfinite.

These and other features and advantages of this invention will become readily apparent to those skilled in the art upon reference to the following description when taken into consideration with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a checkers type playing board with the playingpieces thereon;

FIG..2 is a fragmentary perspective view of one of the playing pieces and illustrating in particular the N-S magnet in one corner of the square playing piece;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are top plan views of the playing piece of FIG. 2 with FIG. 4 showingthe playing piece rotated 90 and being of a different color;

FIGS. 5 and 6 show the playing pieces in capture and repulsion positions respectively;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a space station playing board and the playing pieces thereon;

FIG. 8 is a perspective fragmentary view of the playing piece for the space station playing board with one pole broken away to show the magnet;

FIGS. 9 and 10 are plan views of the playing pieces of FIG. 8 with FIG. 10 showing the playing piece rotated 90 and being of a different color; and

FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate the positions of the playing pieces in captureand repulsion positions.

The game board and game piecesare shown in FIG. I and are referred to generally by the reference numeral 10. In this embodiment a game board such as a checkers board 12 is employed having alternate dark squares l4 and light squares 16. The opposing players initially place their playing pieces 18 and 20 at opposite sides of the board for movement onto and across the board in directions permitted by the rules and as indicated by throw of a dice 22.

The game piece 20 as seen in FIG. 2 is generally square in shape corresponding to the squares 14 and 16 on the game board 12. In opposite corners 24 and 26 are magnets 28 and 30 having vertically arranged north and south poles. The other pair of corners 32 and 34 have no magnet means in them.

The players pieces 18 and 20 are distinguishable from each other by being of different colors as indicated by the cross hatching on the pieces in FIGS. 1 and 4.

During playing of the game the players pieces are moved a number of squares on the board and/or are rotated 90 in accordance with the number on the dice that is thrown before each play. The idea of the game is to capture the opponents pieces and thus as seen in FIGS. 5 and 6 the piece 18 has captured the piece 20 in FIG. 5 while in FIG. 6 the piece 18 is repelled or re jected from the piece 20. The alignment of the'magnets 28 and 30 in FIG. 5 shows the top piece 18 with its magnets 28 and 30 similar to the magnets 28 and 30 of the bottom piece 20 and thus the top piece is able to capture the bottom piece 20. Similarly in FIG. 6 the magnets 28 and 30 of the top piece 18 are opposite-the magnets 20 of the bottom piece and the top piece 18 is repelled or rejected away from the bottom piece 20.

In FIGS. 3 and 4 the rotation through is illustrated which is one possible way of utilizing one move given to the player by the throw of the dice which may or may not place the player in a position to capture an opponents piece. It is only when the magnets are in the position of FIG. 5 that capture is possible and all the other positions are either neutral or will cause repulsion as shown in FIG. 6.

Although it is optional, the magnets 30 are color coded on one side as indicated by the reference numeral 30A such that when the playing pieces are aligned with two colored magnets vertically disposed capture will be possible. The game can be played without color coding the magnets leaving a greater challenge for the memory and much of the playing to chance.

In FIG. 7 a space station game board 40 is provided which includes a representation of the earth 42 in the center and orbital paths circling the earth but connected to the earth by launching paths 46. The board is completed by illustration of constellations 48 and stars 50. A dice 22 is also provided.

The game pieces for the game board 40 are space station shaped pieces circular in shape with four poles arranged symmetrically around the periphery of the pieces. Thus the game piece 52 includes a ring 54, a center hub 56 interconnected to the ring by four radial pieces 58. Magnetic poles 60 and 62 are provided on one pair of opposite sides while neutral poles 64 are provided on the other pair of opposite sides. Again for identification purposes the top 66 of one of the magnets, magnet 60 is color coded to assist in orientation during the play of the game although this color coding may be omitted if the game is to be made more challenging to the players. Looking at FIGS. 9 and 10 it is seen that the game piece 52 is represented by one color while in FIG. 10 a game piece 54 is cross hatched to indicate a different color and also the game piece 54 has been rotated 90 from the position of the game piece 52 in FIG. 9 to indicate utilization of one move given by the throw of the dice 22.

Also vertically arranged north-south magnets are provided in the magnetized poles 60 and 62.

In the play of the game it is seen from FIGS. 11 and 12 that the capture position of FIG. 11 requires that the game piece 52 be aligned with the magnet poles 60 together in addition to the opposite magnet poles 62 being together. Conversely, the repulsion or avoidance of capture position indicated in FIG. 12 shows the poles out of phase such that the pole 62 is vertically arranged above the pole 60 on opposite sides of the playing piece.

I claim:

1. A game construction comprising,

a game board having alternate paths of movement for game pieces,

a plurality of game pieces including pieces for opposing players, and

each of said game pieces having an axial center and a pair of vertically arranged N-S magnet means disposed 180 apart and the magnetic means in each pair in each game piece being oriented in opposite directions whereby upon one game piece being moved over another game piece the two game pieces will be magnetically attracted to each other or repelled according to the rotational orientation of the two game pieces so that the upper game piece may capture the lower game piece if the game pieces are magnetically attracted to each other and so that subsequent moves of the said upper game piece will cause the captured lower game piece to move therewith.

2. The structure of claim 1 wherein said game pieces are circular in shape.

3. The structure of claim 1 wherein said game pieces include four equally spaced peripherally located poles, two which include said pair of magnetic means.

4. The structure of claim 3 wherein each of said game pieces includes a center axially located hub portion connected to a peripherally disposed ring through radial extending portions, said four poles being integrally connected to said ring.

5. The structure of claim 4 wherein visual orientation identification means is provided on each of said game pieces to indicate the orientation and location of the magnetic means.

6. The structure of claim 1 wherein said game pieces are square in shape and said pair of magnetic means are located in diagonally opposite corners with the other pair of corners being comprised of non magnetic material.

7. The structure of claim 6 wherein visual orientation identification means is provided on each of said game pieces to indicate the orientation and location of the magnetic means.

8. The structure of claim 3 wherein said game board includes a center earth starting station with substantially concentric orbital paths extending therearound in spaced apart relationship, and launching paths extending in spaced apart relationship outwardly from said earth starting station to said orbital paths.

9. The structure of claim 8 wherein each of said orbital paths include a plurality of orbit space locations and each of said launching paths interconnecting a space station on each of said orbital paths.

10. The structure of claim 6 wherein said game board is rectangular in shape and includes a plurality of straight rows of playing stations across the board from each of its sides.

Patent Citations
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US443604 *Oct 3, 1890Dec 30, 1890 Charles brooke todd
US1605703 *Feb 18, 1925Nov 2, 1926Brown StewartChecker game
US2226287 *Oct 26, 1938Dec 24, 1940Gen ElectricMagnetic coupler
US2463795 *Jun 30, 1947Mar 8, 1949Neuzerling Francis JMagnetic amusement device requiring playing skill
US2819904 *May 17, 1956Jan 14, 1958Walter M NelsonGame board and playing pieces therefor
US2951703 *Apr 10, 1958Sep 6, 1960Jr Edward H ArnoldMagnetic markers
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3761092 *Jun 1, 1971Sep 25, 1973M ShieffMagnetic checkers game
US3765679 *Nov 29, 1972Oct 16, 1973Connell T OGame employing magnet playing pieces and magnetizable game
US3826496 *Aug 20, 1973Jul 30, 1974Summa FEducational space game
US4005866 *Sep 15, 1975Feb 1, 1977Jean Pierre MarcilMagnetic game
US4161315 *Nov 14, 1977Jul 17, 1979Walton Jimmy WStacker for game counters
US4219944 *Jun 8, 1979Sep 2, 1980Keenan Joyce AWall mountable astrology set
US4331333 *Jul 7, 1977May 25, 1982Willcocks Martin E GApparatus and method for playing a board game
US4515370 *Jun 16, 1983May 7, 1985Garcia Manuel EBoard game
US4861039 *Aug 1, 1988Aug 29, 1989Phillips E LakinMethod of playing a magnetic checkers game
US4954114 *Oct 6, 1989Sep 4, 1990Atuko KawashimaCombination toy with a cover and inner members
US4991836 *Jan 19, 1989Feb 12, 1991Benjamin JoffeDynamic game apparatus and method using multiple magnets and a magnetic manipulator below them
US5662326 *Aug 26, 1996Sep 2, 1997Educational Chess EnterprisesChess set construction
US6402144 *May 23, 2000Jun 11, 2002Roy V. EkbergEducational card game and method
US8505918 *Feb 6, 2013Aug 13, 2013Accomplice Productions, LLCThree dimensional tic-tac-toe game
US20130001873 *Jun 28, 2012Jan 3, 2013Kineti-Go Games, LlcDevices and methods for magnetic-glide games
WO2007094941A2 *Jan 26, 2007Aug 23, 2007Walterscheid SteveMagnetic acrobat game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/239, 273/290, 273/253, 273/260
International ClassificationA63F3/02, A63F3/00, A63F9/34
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2003/00022, A63F3/00694, A63F2003/00738
European ClassificationA63F3/00M