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Publication numberUS3681790 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 8, 1972
Filing dateJun 15, 1970
Priority dateJun 15, 1970
Publication numberUS 3681790 A, US 3681790A, US-A-3681790, US3681790 A, US3681790A
InventorsDooley John
Original AssigneeDooley John
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ventilated water closets automatically affording protection of its ventilating means from water damage
US 3681790 A
Abstract
The ventilating equipment comprises an exhaust pipe extending as an upward branch from the overflow pipe, up through the tank and then outward to a motor-driven exhaust pump discharging to the outside atmosphere. The exhaust pipe has an opening within the tank above the maximum water lever, which opening is closed by a sleeve valve element linked for operation by the rod carrying the float. Intermediate its ends, the overflow pipe has a ball formation housing a free float which seats itself downwardly by vacuum action to close the overflow pipe while the latter is empty, but which float rises to a stop when water gets into the ball housing.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 1 3,681, Dooley 14 1 Aug. 8, 1972 541 VENTILATED WATER CLOSETS 3,495,282 2/1970 Taggart ..4/213 UT gg q gfigg g g ggfiig FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS MEANS FROM WATER DAMAGE 662,210 2/1965 Belgium ..4/213 [72] Inventor: John Dooley, Madison Gardens Bldg, 30, Apt. 603, Oldbridge, NJ.

[22] Filed: June 15, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 46,185

[52] US. Cl ..4/216 [51] Int. Cl. ..E03d 9/04 [58] Field ofSearch ..4/213, 209,214, 217,215, 4/218, 216

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,342,716 6/1920 Johnston ..4/213 1,998,657 4/1935 De La Croix ..4/213 2,126,131 8/1938 Orebaugh ..4/213 2,575,778 11/1951 Wilson ..4/213 2,778,033 1/1957 Majauskas ..4/213 3,192,539 7/1965 Martz ..4/218 Primary Examiner-Frederick L. Matteson Assistant Examiner-Donald B. Massenberg Attorney-Friedman & Goodman [5 7] ABSTRACT The ventilating equipment comprises an exhaust pipe extending as an upward branch from the overflow pipe, up through the tank and then outward to a motor-driven exhaust pump discharging to the outside atmosphere. The exhaust pipe has an opening within the tank above the maximum water lever, which opening is closed by a sleeve valve element linked for operation by the rod carrying the float. Intermediate its ends, the overflow pipe has a ball formation housing a free float which seats itself downwardly by vacuum action to close the overflow pipe while the latter is empty, but which float rises to a stop when water gets into the ball housing.

7 Claims, 2 Drawing figures PATENTEDM B 8 i972 FIG.I

FIG.2

2o INVEMOR,

John Dooley, y 42,

ATTORNEY- VENTILATED WATER CLOSETS AUTOMATICALLY AFFORDING PROTECTION OF ITS VENTILATING MEANS FROM WATER DAMAGE The present invention relates to, and its principal object is to provide a novel and improved means to ventilate a water closet of the type which includes a valve for flushing the water out of a tank into the toilet bowl; said tank having an overflow pipe whose upper end is open to the atmosphere and whose lower end is connected directly to the bowl; the supply to the tank being controlled by a float-operated valve which also usually attends to refilling the basin of the bowl.

Another object thereof is to provide a novel and improved ventilating system to eliminate the obnoxious odors that occur in a water closet during use, and particularly adapted to be incorporated in water closets having conventional flushing equipment installations.

A further object thereof is to provide a novel and im proved water closet ventilating system of the character described, in which suction produced by an exhaust fan, is applied to draw air from the bowl, up into the overflow tube whose top end is automatically closed by a simple vacuum-actuated valve only while no water is being flushed into the bowl, and automatically opened while water is being flushed into the bowl and until the water in the tank is replenished; the suction action being disconnected from the bowl during any flow of water, so no water in carried into the air ventilating structure. I

Still another object of this invention is to provide a novel and improved water closet ventilating system of the kind set forth, having the stated attributes, and which is simple in construction, having a novel mode of operation, besides being reasonable in cost, and efficient in operation and in the carrying out of the purposes for which it is designed.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent as this disclosure proceeds.

For one practice of this invention, the water closet is of the conventional type which includes a toilet bowl connectedto be flushed by water from a tank, initiated by the opening of a ball valve at the bottom of the tank. A water inlet pipe into the tank, is controlled by a valve relying on a float at the end of a rod associated with such valve 5 operating element. This last-mentioned valve, is closed when the water in the tank reaches a highest permitted level. There is an overflow pipe within the tank, open at its upper end, and connected at its lower end to the bowl. A bowl refill tube discharges into this pipe.

The ventilating equipment comprises an exhaust pipe leading from the bowl, up through the tank and then outward therefrom to a motor-driven exhaust pump which discharges to the outside atmosphere. The exhaust pipe has an opening in its wall within the tank above the maximum water level; such opening being closed by a sleeve valve element slidably mounted on the exhaust pipe and linked for operation by the rod which carries the float. When the water level drops in the tank, the sleeve valve is opened, thus disconnecting the suction action from the bowl while water flow into and out of the tank, but is closed when water flow stops, thereby again reestablishing connection of the bowl to vacuum action. Intermediate the ends of the overflow pipe, it has an enlarged bulb formation housing a free float which seats itself downwardly by vacuum action to close the overflow pipe while the latter is empty, but which float rises from its seat to an upper stop when water gets into said bulb housing.

In the accompanying drawing forming part of this specification, similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary front view of a ventilated water closet embodying the teachings of this invention. Parts are broken away to expose interior structure and parts are shown in section. Some parts are diagrammatically shown. This view shows the ventilating system in operative condition. The tank is full and no water is flowing.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary view, showing the condition while water is flowing, and suction action is disconnected from the bowl. The tank is omitted in this view.

In the preferred embodiment of this invention, the water closet, except for its ventilation equipment, is conventional, and comprises a toilet bowl designated generally by the numeral 15, whose flushing ring 16 having spaced discharge apertures 17 all around it, is connected to the tank discharge pipe 18, which leads from the flush tank 19, whose water supply is to be flushed into the bowl 15. The entrance to said discharge pipe 18, is controlled by the usual ball valve 20, whose float 21 is liftable by manual operation of a lever 22, which is at the front of said tank 19. A normally closed valve 23, interposed in the supply pipe 24, is adapted when opened, to discharge a water supply at 25 into the tank, and also to discharge water into the upper end of an open-top overflow pipe denoted generally by the numeral 26, to refill the basin, not shown, of the toilet bowl. Operation of the valve 23 is controlled by the position of the float 27 which is at the end of a swingable bar 28 which cooperates with the operating element 29. The position of the float 27, depends of course upon the level of the water in the tank 19; such valve being in closed condition when the water level reaches the highest permitted, as indicated at L. Upon the lowering of such level, said valve assumes open condition. The lower end of the overflow pipe 26, is connected to the bowl 15. The bowl has the usual seat 30 and its cover 31. It is preferred, that the underside of the seat shall carry a gasket 32, so the only air entering the bowl 15 when in use, is restricted to that portion of the seats opening which is between the thighs of the seated person. The tank 19, usually having a cover 33, is at the back of the user.

For the practice of this invention, a vent pipe 34 extends from the bowl, and may be an upward branch from the lower end portion of the overflow pipe 26. This vent pipe, above the highest permitted water level L, has an opening 35, which is covered air-tight by a slidable sleeve 36, thereby offering a valve; said sleeve being linked by link 37 to the rod 28, so that upon the lowering of the float 27, the opening 35 is opened to atmosphere by the opening 38 in said sleeve. The vent pipe 34 has an extension 34' which leads to an outside exhaust pump 39, discharging to the outside atmosphere from either attic or celler. Also, the overflow pipe 26, is provided with an enlarged spherical bulb formation 40 intermediate its ends, which houses a free spherical float 41, adapted to seat itself on the seat 42,

3 when forced downward by suction action, to close said overflow pipe, but upon the entrance of water into said bulb 40, said float 41 will come to the stop rod 43, which holds it away for the upper opening of said bulb. The electric motor 44 for driving the pump, is in a circuit which is closed by a switch 45, positioned for easy access to the user.

With the seat cover 31 raised and the switch 45 closed, the prospective user sits on the seat. The condition of the apparatus is as shown in FIG. 1 wherein the pump 39 is working, exhausting the air from the bowl through the vent system piping 34, 34 and creating a vacuum condition in the lower part of the overflow pipe 26, causing the float 41 to be drawn downwardly onto the seat 42, to close the valve they comprise. The air being drawn from the bowl, is exhausted by the pump to the outside atmosphere through the duct 34; the valve offered by the openings 35 and 38, being closed. All obnoxious odors and contaminated air occuring in the water closet, are being expelled to the outside atmosphere. The valve is in closed condition, and so is the valve 23, since the water level in the tank is at L. No water is flowing into or out of the tank.

As soon as the user flushes the stored water into the bowl 15, by operating the lever 22, to open the bulb valve 20, the level of the water in the tank falls, and so does the float 27. This causes the sleeve 36 to be slid downward, whereupon the openings 35 and 38 are made communicative. This disconnects the suction action playing on the float 41, and connects the pumps intake to atmosphere through the communicative openings 35,38. Flushing of the tanks stored water into the bowl15, continues until the water level falls to L, whereupon the bulb 21 drops to close the valve 20. The valve 23 is of course in open condition, admitting a fresh supply of water through 25 to refill the tank 19, and there is a flow of water through the refill pipe 46, to refill the toilet bowls basin, by passage through the overflow pipe 26, which is opened because water entering the bulb cavity 40, will cause the float 41 to rise.

While water is flowing out of the tank 19, through the flush pipe connection 18, into the flushing ring 16 and thence outwardly therefrom through the perforations 17 into the bowl 15, and while water is flowing into the overflow pipe 26, the openings 35 and 38 are communicative, and therefor no water can be sucked into the vent system and the exhausting apparatus, 34, 34', 29, which prevention is very important. The extremely simple valve for this purpose offered by the use of the sleeve 36 and its operating link connection to the float valves rod 28, is as is evident, an extremely economical manner of automatically affording this protection feature. While water is flowing through the valve 23, the openings 35 and 38 are communicative, but the valve they constitute is closed when the water level in the tank is at L, whereupon the exhaust system is again connected, operating to exhaust air from the toilet bowl 15, and of course, the ball float 41 is again seated against 42, closing the overflow pipe 26, so the suction action is effective to clear the water closet air.

For installation of this system in conventional water closets existing in buildings, the overflow pipe they include, is removed, and in its place, there is installed the unit comprising the new overflow pipe taught herein, designated by the numeral 26, and its-vent branch 34,

4 equipped with the sleeve valve. Thereupon, the link 37 is installed, which comes with such unit, and only needs the connection thereof to be made to the rod 28. Of course, the suction apparatus 39,34 and its control circuit are added in the building, and the vent pipe 34' is installed and connected.

This invention is capable of numerous forms and various applications without departing from the essential features herein disclosed. It is therefore intended and desired that the embodiment shown herein shall be deemed merely illustrative and not restrictive, and that the patent shall cover all patentable novelty herein set forth; reference being had to the following claims rather than to the specific showing and description herein, to indicate the scope of this invention.

Iclaim:

1. In a system for ventilating a water closet of the type including a toilet bowl, a flush tank connected by a discharge pipe to said toilet bowl, a first valve in the tank, controlling the upper end of the discharge pipe, for flushing the water out of the tank into said toilet bowl, an overflow pipe connected to said discharge pipe, a water supply pipe extending into the tank where it is controlled by a second valve operated by a swingable rod carrying a first float in the tank whereby said second valve is closed only when the water in the tank is at a highest permitted level, and a refill pipe fed from said second valve and discharging into the upper end of the overflow pipe; the improvement consisting of an exhaust pipe communicating with said tank discharge pipe and extending to the atmosphere outside the water closet, an air exhaust means connected to said exhaust pipe, adapted to draw air out of the toilet bowl; said overflow pipe having an enlargement means intermediate its ends, a second float positioned within said enlargement means; said enlargement means having a seat onto which said second float seats and thereby closes passage through said overflow pipe; said second float, when water collects inside said enlargement means after entering said overflow pipe, rising from said seat and thereby clears passage through said overflow pipe, and means within the overflow pipe to limit the upward movement of said second float whereby passage through said overflow pipe is maintained.

2. A system as defined in claim 1, wherein the exhaust pipe extends as an upward branch of the overflow pipe from near the bottom end of such overflow pipe.

3. A system as defined in claim 1, wherein the toilet bowl is provided with a seat over the rim of said bowl, and including a gasket between said seat and rim to form a seal against air entering between said bowl and seat; said seat being movable with respect to said rim.

4. A system as defined in claim 1, wherein the exhaust pipe is provided with an opening in its wall within the tank above the highest permitted water level, a third valve controlling said opening, operated by the rod which carries the first float, whereby when the water in the tank is at said highest permitted level, said third valve is in closed condition, and when the second valve is in open condition, the third valve is in open condition connecting the exhaust pipe to atmosphere in the tank.

5. A system as defined in claim 4, wherein said third valve comprises a slidable sleeve in air-tight contact with and on the exhaust pipe within the tank, and link- 6. A system as defined in claim 5, wherein the linkage comprises a single link pivotally connected at its ends to said rod and sleeve respectively.

7. A system as defined in claim 1, wherein said enlargement means in the overflow pipe is downwardly tapered in its lower portion; said seat being at the bottom of said enlargement and said second float being of spherical form, free to fall towards said seat when said enlargement means is empty of water.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1342716 *Dec 10, 1917Jun 8, 1920Johnston Edwin ACloset-ventilator
US1998657 *Aug 20, 1934Apr 23, 1935La Croix Alfred G DeVentilating apparatus
US2126131 *Jul 25, 1936Aug 9, 1938Orebaugh Samuel EForced ventilator for toilet bowls
US2575778 *Aug 21, 1945Nov 20, 1951Wilson Theodore RVentilated toilet
US2778033 *Jul 11, 1955Jan 22, 1957Majauskas Charles JVentilator for water closets
US3192539 *Aug 1, 1963Jul 6, 1965Martz William LVentilators for water closets, kitchens and the like
US3495282 *Nov 16, 1967Feb 17, 1970Taggart Allaird BToilet bowl and exhaust device
BE662210A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3939506 *Aug 13, 1974Feb 24, 1976Pearson Raymond HOdor control ventilator
US3942200 *Jan 13, 1975Mar 9, 1976Pearson Raymond HOdor control ventilator
US5179738 *Jul 11, 1991Jan 19, 1993Sowards Edward WR. V. toilet venting system
US5839127 *Oct 31, 1997Nov 24, 1998Curiel; Jesus M.Odor extractor apparatus
US6219853 *Dec 3, 1998Apr 24, 2001Steven W. JohnsonToilet ventilation system
US7162751Dec 7, 2004Jan 16, 2007Mundt Fred SVentilated toilet system
DE102008038120A1Aug 17, 2008Apr 8, 2010Scholta, Winfried E.Smell adsorption module for use as container for axially sucked and blown air stream, has bars and grooves formed at inner and outer wall sides of container for switch, battery, sensors, operating elements and other functional elements
WO1999041464A1 *Feb 10, 1999Aug 19, 1999Luc DannenmuellerImproved device and method for eliminating odours in toilets
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/216, 4/213
International ClassificationE03D9/04, E03D9/052
Cooperative ClassificationE03D9/052
European ClassificationE03D9/052