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Publication numberUS3682212 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 8, 1972
Filing dateJun 1, 1970
Priority dateJun 1, 1970
Publication numberUS 3682212 A, US 3682212A, US-A-3682212, US3682212 A, US3682212A
InventorsBrewer William B
Original AssigneeWeir Magic Pit Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of manufacturing wood-siding panels
US 3682212 A
Abstract
A panel-like wood-siding unit composed of a wood panel backing and a panel-like multiplicity of log-slabs of random lengths nailed or otherwise secured to the backing in closely arranged longitudinally-extending parallel rows of random widths. A manufacturing method therefor is performed by (1) placing at least two 8 foot wall back panels in close end-to-end relationship, (2) covering the back panels with log-slabs of random lengths arranged to form a multiplicity of parallel rows of random widths extending lengthwise over both back panels and over the joint line between back panels, the slabs in each row being of matched widths, (3) securing each log-slab to the underlying back panel to integrate the log-slabs and back panels into a connected pair of panel-like wood-siding units, and (4) cutting the log-slabs of that pair along the joint line between them to separate one panel-like wood-siding unit from the other.
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United States Patent Brewer [54] METHOD OF MANUFACTURING WOOD-SIDING PANELS Inventor: William B. Brewer, New Castle, Ky.

Assignee: Weir Magic Pit Corporation, New

- Castle, Ky.

[22] Filed: June 1, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 42,286

[52] US. Cl ..l44/318, 52/314 [51] Int. Cl "B271 7/00, 1504c 2/24 [58] Field or Search.....29/4l6; [44/309 R, 314, 318, 144/319; 52/233, 314, 313; 46/20; 161/39,

[ 1 Aug. 8, 1972 Primary Examiner.lohn E, Murtagh Attorney-Arthur F. Robert 57 ABSTRACT 56 R ed back panels, the slabs in each row being of matched l e mm widths, (3) securing each log-slab to the underlying UNlTED STATES PATENTS back panel to ieriitegrate fthe lolgisliabs :23 back panels into a connect pair 0 pane -i e w -si ing units, cutting the g of that p along 2 892,192 "I 3 to separate one paneLllke 3:436:290 4/1969 Reissner ..144/309 3,515,620 6/ 1970 McPherson ..l44/309 1 Claim, 5 Drawing figures PATENT-Em 1m 3.882.212

. INVENTOR WILLIAM B. BREWER ATTORNEY METHOD OF MANUFACTURING WOOD-SIDING PANELS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention v This invention relates to a panel-like wood-siding unit which may be fabricated, in one case, for use as a building wall, wherein it may or may not support any weight of the building, and, in another case, for use over an existing building wall wherein it functions primarily to simulate a log-type wall, which gives the building a desired log-cabin appearance but which does not normally support any weight of the building.

More particularly, this invention relates to a panellike wood-siding unit of the log-slab type. By logslab, I mean a slab of wood that is the same as (or the equivalent of) a logging-slab which Websters New International Dictionary, (2nd Ed. Copr. 1953) defines as the outside piece, with or without the bark, taken from a log in sawing it into boards.

2. Description of the Prior Art A panel-like multiplicity of parallel log-slabs of uniform length and width, is used in many prior art wall constructions. Thus a panel-like multiplicity of longitudinally parallel log-slabs extends, l in the Adams US. Pat. No. 1,445,738, from one cross frame member to another in a bungalow side wall, (2) in the Beardall US. Pat. No. 1,573,029, across the opening of a 4- sided box-like frame in another side wall structure, and (3) in the Bonn US. Pat. No. 1,980,660, over the outer face (or both faces) of a panel-backing, to which it is secured to provide another side wall structure. In all of these prior art constructions, all slabs, in a given panellike multiplicity, appear to be of uniform length, width and thickness.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION Objects of the Invention I The principal object of the present invention is to provide a unique panel-like wood-siding unit of the logslab type which may be fabricated for use as a building wall unit in one case and, in another, for use over an existing wall of a building to provide that building with an exterior simulating the rustic appearance of a log cabin.

Other important objects are: to provide a rigid panellike wood-siding of log-slab type which is of improved character in respect to manufacturing cost, rigidity and rustic appearance; and to provide a novel, simple and inexpensive method of manufacturing panel-like wall siding units of the log-slab type, which have an unusually high degree of rigidity and an improved rustic appearance. Statement of the Invention Speaking broadly, my invention resides in providing a panel-like wood-siding unit of the log-slab type composed of a wood-panel backingand a panel-like multiplicity of log-slabs of random lengths closely arranged to extend lengthwise in parallel rows of random widths over that backing and secured thereto.

Most, if not all, of the important features of my invention, are achieved (a) by using log-slabs of random lengths, (b) by matching the widths of adjacent ends of the log-slabs in each row, (c) by extending the rows over the length of (and across the joint line between) at least two adjacent panels so as to manufacture the units in connected pairs, (d) by securing each log-slab to the underlying panel and (e) by separating one panel from the other. By the use of log-slabs of random lengths in each row and of rows of random widths, waste of wood is reduced while panel rigidity and production are increased with corresponding savings in manufacturing expense.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS My invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a pair of wood panels arranged in end-to-end relationship;

FIG. 2 shows one series of log slabs of random lengths in matched widths placed on and secured to the back panel to form one row of one width;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged section taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 2; v

FIG. 4 shows a 2nd series of log-slabs of random lengths and matched widths placed on and secured to the back panel to form an adjacent row of different width; and

FIG. 5 is a photographic plan view of the final product.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED PRACTICE In the preferred practice of my invention, two or more wood back panels 1 and 2 are horizontally arranged on any suitable support in close end-to-end formation to provide a backing 3. For the sake of clarity, we shall assume that only two back panels are so arranged as seen in FIG. 1. While the back panels 1 and 2 may be of any desired size or type, we shall again assume that each is a 4 X 8 feet laminated back panel of any suitable thickness and number of plies, e.g. threeply in one case, five-ply in another, etc.

A multiplicity of log-slabs of random lengths are closely arranged to extend lengthwise in parallel rows of random widths over the backing 3 and are secured thereto. Thus, in FIG. 2, three log-slabs, designated generally by the numeral 5 and, because of their random lengths, designated individually by the numerals 6, 7 and 8, are arranged over the backing 3 to extend lengthwise in one row 9. Preferably, the width of the log-slabs 6 at one end matches the width of the adjacent end of log-slab 7 while the width of the other end of log-slab 7 matches that of the adjacent end of logslab 8. Preferably also, the .width of row 9 is more or less uniform, the magnitude thereof depending on the log-slabs available. Each log-slab 5 in row 9 is rigidly secured in any suitable manner to backing 3. As illustrated, each is secured by two or more nails 10.

In FIG. 4, four log-slabs, designated generally by the numeral 5 and, because of their random lengths, designated individually by the numerals 12, 13, 14 and 15, are arranged over the backing 3 to extend lengthwise in one row 16, which is parallel to the row 9 and arranged closely adjacent thereto. If desired, a space between adjacent rows may be provided to receive a caulking material simulating the clay traditionally used in log cabin structures to seal cracks. Preferably, the width of the log-slabs 12-15 in row 16 are matched in the same manner as the log-slabs 6-8 of row 9. Preferably also, the width of row 16 is more or less uniform, the magnitude thereof being the same as or different from that of row 9, again depending upon the log-slabs available.

collectively be of a uniform width. Accordingly, the

term random widths is herein used broadly to embrace a tapering width situation of this character.

Each log-slab 5 in row 16 is, of course, secured to backing 3 in the same way as they are secured in row 9. However, since random lengths are used, the securing means will normally secure the slabs 5 to the backing 3 through a system of securing points, which are located in a non-uniform orhaphazard pattern. This pattem, which normally contains a pair of transverse rows of securing points, one at the opposite ends of each single unit,will normally be characterized (between such trimmed as by cutting off the projecting ends of the rows such as the projecting end 17 inrow 9 and 18 in row 16. Now, the multiple wood-siding unit thus fabricated may be used as is or it may be separated into two wood-siding units 20,22 by cutting the log-slabs 5,

which extend across the adjacent ends of the panels 1 and 2, along the joint line 21 which extends between them, as seen in FIG. 5.

From the foregoing, it will be appreciated that l have provided a novel, simple and inexpensive method of manufacturing a panel-like wall siding unit of the logslab type. Each unit has an unusually high degree of rigidity because the points, at which the log-slabs are secured to the backing in one row will not normally line up transversely with the securing points of the remaining rows but, on the contrary, will be offset therefrom in a somewhat haphazard manner.

For example, if spaced parallel transverse rows of nails were used to secure the log-slabs 5 to a back panel, then the resistance of the wood-siding unit to bending along transverse lines is large at (and adjacent to) each transverse securing row but such resistance decreases from that securing row progressively toward the half-way point between it and the next adjacent 4 securing row. At such half-way point, the resistance (to the bending of the panel transversely) is at a minimum. By eliminating spaced transverse parallel rows of nails and substituting a haphazard'arrangement of nailing or other securing points, the resistance of the panel to transverse bending becomes more or less uniform over its entire surface area. This gives the wood-siding unit a rigidity which is of material advantage.

Also, by using log-slabs of matched width in each row, so that the rows are more or less of uniform width (whether tapered or not), the appearance of the wood-' siding unit is enhanced without detracting from its rustic character. Furthermore, by making double siding-units, it becomes possible to match them in a given strength or its rustic appearance.

An important advantage '(of the random width and length features of this invention) is'that it permits, in fact promotes, the use of scrap logs. These are trimmed, along their long side edges to a straight edge preferably having a thickness ranging from about 3/4 to about l inch although this may vary. While the backing 3 preferably is a solid wood back panel, any other equivalent back panel may be used. In some cases, flake-board, particleboard, Masonite or other back panels may be employed. Backings 3 of longer lengths such as 12 or l6feet long, may be used to provide individual siding units of longer lengths. Thus, single or connected siding units of any desired length may be initially fabricated and then used asis or cut to provide two or more siding units of identical lengthsor of dif-' ferential lengths.

Having described my invention, I claim:

1. A method of making a panel-like wood-siding unit, I

comprising:

A. providing a pair of wood back panels of desired length and width arranged in close end-to-end relationship;

B. covering the back panels with log-slabs of random lengths arranged to form a multiplicity of parallel rows of random widths extending lengthwise over both back panels and -over the joint line between

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1980660 *May 10, 1933Nov 13, 1934Bonn Charles WConstruction of log cabins
US2390712 *Feb 11, 1943Dec 11, 1945Sloane BlabonDecorative material and method for producing the same
US2892192 *Aug 17, 1954Jun 30, 1959Inland Homes CorpPrefabricated houses
US3436290 *Jun 18, 1965Apr 1, 1969Factories Direction LtdMethod of making sheet materials of desired size from smaller sheets joined together
US3515620 *Feb 23, 1967Jun 2, 1970Pope & Talbot CoDecorative,laminated wood panel and method of making same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4335142 *Sep 11, 1979Jun 15, 1982Uniroyal, Inc.Aryl (1-arylsulfonyl) vinyl sulfones
US7089709 *Dec 4, 2002Aug 15, 2006Shear Tech, Inc.Siding having indicia defining a fastening zone
US7870699 *Apr 14, 2006Jan 18, 2011Shear Tech, Inc.Siding having indicia defining a fastening zone
US8341898Jun 30, 2011Jan 1, 2013Grand Log Homes LLCModular log assembly system
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/353, 52/314
International ClassificationB27M3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27M3/00
European ClassificationB27M3/00