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Publication numberUS3683906 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1972
Filing dateAug 28, 1970
Priority dateAug 28, 1970
Publication numberUS 3683906 A, US 3683906A, US-A-3683906, US3683906 A, US3683906A
InventorsRobinson Ralph R
Original AssigneeRobinson Ralph R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shielded intrauterine device
US 3683906 A
Abstract
Opposed members of a collapsible intrauterine contraceptive device have stretches of membranous material extending therebetween which lie flatly between the normally front and rear walls of the uterus to increase the total surface area of the device contacting such walls, thereby presenting a generally flat, planar device which resists embedment within the tissues of the walls.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [15] 3,683,906 Robinson [451 Aug. 15, 1972 [54] SHIELDED INTRAUTERINE DEVICE 3,425,411 2/1969 Robinson ..128/130 [72] Inventor: Ralph R. Robinson, P.O. Box 668,

Middlesboro Ky. 09 5 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-G. F. Dunne [22] 1970 Attorney-Schmidt, Johnson, Hovey and Williams [21] Appl. No.: 67,885

[57] ABSTRACT [52] US. Cl. ..l28/l30 O d m bers of a collapsible intrauterine con- [51] Int. Cl. ..A61f 5/46 traceptive device have stretches of membranous [58] Fleld of Search ..l28/137, 127 aterial extending therebetween which lie flatly between the normally front and rear walls of the [56] Refermces Cted uterus to increase the total surface area of the device UNYTED STATES PATENTS contacting such walls, thereby presenting a generally flat, planar device which resists embedment within the 3,291,125 12/1966 Robinson ..128/ 130 tissues f the walls 3,633,574 1/1972 Lerner ..128/130 3,256,878 6/1966 Schwartz 128/130 5 Claim, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTEDAUB 15 I972 3.683.906

1N v/m '1; UR. Ralph H. Robinson ATTORNEYS.

SHIELDED INTRAUTERINE DEVICE This invention relates to intrauterine contraceptive devices and has as its primary object the goal of appreciably reducing or entirely eliminating bleeding problems which have sometimes been known to occur as a result of embedment of a conventional intrauterine device within the muscular walls of the uterus underlying the soft inner lining thereof.

Another important object of the instant invention is to provide an intrauterine device capable of carrying out the above object, yet which may be easily collapsed into a slender insertion tube to permit placement of the device within the uterus without the need for painful dilation of the cervical opening.

A further important object of the invention is the provision of a device as aforementioned having embedment-impeding structure incorporated into the body of the device, which structuredoes not interfere with the function of parts of the device operating to prevent expulsion of the latter from the uterus.

Yet another important object of this invention is the provision of such a device wherein the embedment-impeding structure thereof also serves to eliminate the need for a closed loop configuration in the device in order to obtain expulsion-resistive qualities.

A still further important object of the present invention is to provide a device having all of the qualities as above set forth, with the additional provision of particles of a metallic substance infused into the body of the device to augment its contraceptive properties.

The above objects are capable of being carried out in the present invention by the provision of a membrane having metallic particles impregnated therein which spans the distance between opposed arms in the main portion of the body of the device. The inherent qualities of the membrane, including its sheet-like nature and flexibility, tend to present in the device a generally flat, planar configuration whereby to increase resistance to embedment within the front and rear walls of the uterus, yet permit the arms of the device to be readily collapsed toward one another to facilitate insertion of the device by means of a slender insertion tube;

. Similarly, flat, soft, and pliable lobes which span the distance between opposed legs of the upper terminals of the, device increase the total surface area thereof and lie flatly between the front and rear walls of the uterus to impede embedment of the device, while permitting the terminals to be folded toward one another to facilitate insertion and removal from the uterus.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a device embodying the principles of my present invention showing the device in place within a human uterus;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged, front elevational view of the device shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view thereof;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary, cross-sectional view of the device taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, fragmentary, cross-sectional view of the device taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 6 is a side elevational view of the device on a reduced scale illustrating the manner in which the device lies flatly between the front and rear walls of the uterus.

Viewing FIG. 2, the intrauterine contraceptive device has a body 10 which is adapted for disposition between the opposed, normally front and rear walls 12 and 14 of the uterus I6 inwardly of the cervix 18 (FIG. 6) and between its opposed sides 20 and 22 (FIG. 1 Incorporated within the body 10 of the device is structure broadly denoted by the numeral 24 for impeding embedment of body 10 within the walls 12 and I4 and sides 20 and 22, the structure 24 including a membrane 26 in the lower part of body 10 which has a circular bead 28 secured to its outer periphery.

The head 28 about member 26 serves to eliminate what would otherwise be a relatively sharp edge on membrane 26 leading to possible irritation and discomfort to the user. In addition, the bead 28 serves to outline the general configuration of body 10 and includes a pair of opposed, elongated, flexible arms 30 which are joined together at one end thereof and are spaced apart at their opposite ends. An eye 32 at the juncture of the two arms 30 carries a flexible follower 34, and the arms 30 have opposed, outwardly bowed portions 36 therein above the eye 32 which give the lower part of body 10 a generally U-shaped loop appearance and are designed to lie against the sides 20 and 22 of uterus 16 conforming to the shape thereof. Opposed, outwardly curved, generally U-shaped terminals 38 at the opposite ends of the arms 30 are designed to fit between the end wall 40 of uterus l6 and sides 20 and 22 thereof at the mouths 42 of the fallopian tubes, each terminal 38 being provided with a pair of laterally spaced legs 44 and a bight 46 therebetween.

Structure 24 also includes soft, thin, planar and pliable lobes 48 which span the distance between the legs 44 of each terminal 38 to lie flatly between the front and rear walls 12 and 14 adjacent end wall 40 when the device is in use. Each lobe 48 is joined to its corresponding terminal 38at only two locations thereon, namely, to one of the legs 44 by a tab 50 and to the bight 46 by a second tab 52. The tabs 50 and 52 serve to hold, the lobe 48 in a flat disposition and yet, inasmuch as each lobe 48 extends outwardly from its connected leg 44 interiorly of the terminal 38 and terminates in a freeedge 54 spaced from the opposing leg 44, the terminals 38 are free to elongate and fold toward one another when the device is to be housed within an insertion device (not shown) of the type described in my US. Pat. No. 3,467,088, granted Sept. 16, 1969. Such patent is accordingly incorporated into this specification for a full disclosure of the nature and operation of the insertion device.

The arms 30 also have opposed, inwardly bowed sections 56 intermediate the terminals 38 and outwardly bowed portions 36 of the body 10 presenting a slender neck region 58 therebetween. Membrane 26 extends longitudinally of the arms 30 from between outwardly bowed portions 36 and through the neck region 58 to I terminate at a distance from each of the lobes 48 of the terminals 38.

Filling the interior of the lower part of body 10 with the flexible membrane 26 in the manner disclosed, servesa number of extremely beneficial purposes. Primarily, the inherent planar qualities of membrane '26 serve to impede lodgment of the device within the walls 12 and 14 inasmuch as membrane 26 lies flatly between such walls and greatly increases the total surface area of body 10. Accordingly, while the device may tend to embed within the soft endometrium lining of uterus 16, the device is prevented from becoming embedded within the muscular walls of uterus 16 which underlie the endometrium lining and contain many blood vessels which are easily ruptured. By preventing such embedment within the muscular walls, excessive bleeding is thereby eliminated.

Secondly, the presence of the membrane 26 in no way hinders the resistance of the device by means of its outwardly bowed portions 36 and outwardly projecting terminals 38 to expulsion from the uterus 16. Bowed portions 36 and terminals 38 still present a greater lateral dimension to the body than the dimensions of the cervical opening 60. Yet, the inherent resistance of the membrane 26 to lateral stretching tends to limit, to a certain extent, the force with which bowed portions 36 engage sides 20 and 22 thereby impeding embedment of such portions 36 in a lateral direction.

Further, the inherent flexibility of membrane 26, lobes 48, and the spaced relationship between all three of the components, permits the device to be readily collapsed into an elongated, compact package for insertion and removal from the uterus. Additionally, the

disposition of membrane 26 between the arms 30 in the lower part of body 10 and within neck region 58 serves to eliminate the problems associated with a closed loop device which have been known to occur in the event that such devices were inadvertently pushed through the abdominal wall during insertion.

The presence of membrane 26 and lobes 48 not only impedes embedment of the device, but also the increased coverage of surface area within uterus 16 by membrane 26 and lobes 48 tends to augment the contraceptive properties of the device. Further, extensive tests have shown conclusively that the contraceptive properties of the device may be further enhanced by impregnating membrane 26, lobes 48, and the arms 30 with particles of metal, particularly copper, as indicated in cross section in FIGS. 4 and 5.

It may, therefore, be appreciated that the device of the present invention is capable of attaining the primary contraceptive goals of all such intrauterine contraceptive devices, but without the problems and disadvantages which have heretofore been inherent in cer tain of such devices.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. For use in a human uterus having a pair of opposed, normally front and rear walls, a pair of opposed sides between said walls, and a pair of fallopian tubes,

each presenting a mouth, anintrauterine device including:

a body adapted for disposition between said walls of the uterus inwardly of the cervix when inserted into the uterus; and

structure for impeding embedment of the body into the tissues of the uterus, said structure including:

a membrane forming a part of the body and disposed to lie flatly between the aforementioned uterus walls,

said body being provided with a bead secured to said membrane at the periphery thereof,

said bead including a pair of elongated, flexible, and laterally spaced arms joined together at one end, said arms having opposed, outwardly bowed po 'ons fo r erigagin said fidespf the uterus, sai mem rane sp ning t e distance between said outwardly bowed portions and being flexible to permit movement of the arms toward one another,

said arms being provided with outwardlycurved terminals at the opposite ends thereof respectively, each having a pair of opposed legs and a bight which is adapted for disposition at said mouth of one of the fallopian tubes in the uterus,

said structure further including a soft, pliable,

planar lobe secured to each terminal and extending between said opposed legs thereof for lying flatly between said front and rear walls of the uterus,

there being means securing said lobe of each terminal to one of said legs thereof, said lobe extending outwardly from said one leg toward the interior of said terminal and terminating in a free edge adjacent the other leg of the terminal.

2. In a device as claimed in claim 1, wherein is provided means securing said lobe of each terminal to said bight thereof, the periphery of said lobe between its joinder with said one leg and with said bight being free.

3. In a device,as claimed in claim 2, wherein said arms are provided with opposed, spaced-apart, inwardly bowed sections intermediate the outwardly bowed portions thereof and said terminals, said inwardly bowed sections being interconnected by said membrane extending therebetween.

4. In a device as claimed in claim 3, wherein said terminals are generally U-shaped, opening inwardly toward one another, said free edges of the lobes being spaced from one another and from the proximal end of said membrane.

5. In a device as claimed in claim 1, wherein is provided particles of a metallic substance impregnated into said membrane to augment the contraceptive properties of the device.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3256878 *May 28, 1964Jun 21, 1966Hewlett HarborIntra-uterine contraceptive appliance
US3291125 *Sep 23, 1965Dec 13, 1966Robinson Ralph RIntrauterine u-shaped pessary
US3425411 *May 19, 1966Feb 4, 1969Robinson Ralph RIntra-uterine device
US3633574 *Nov 14, 1968Jan 11, 1972Robins Co Inc A HIntrauterine contraceptive device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3785376 *Nov 3, 1971Jan 15, 1974Tecna CorpIntrauterine device
US3789838 *Feb 19, 1971Feb 5, 1974E FournierForce transmitting intrauterine device
US3802425 *Oct 14, 1971Apr 9, 1974Moulding TIntrauterine contraceptive device
US3811435 *Oct 20, 1971May 21, 1974Soichet SIntrauterine device and injection mechanism
US4038978 *Feb 13, 1975Aug 2, 1977John McLean MorrisIntrauterine device
US4040417 *Dec 12, 1973Aug 9, 1977G. D. Searle & Co.Intrauterine device
US4117839 *May 16, 1977Oct 3, 1978Morris John McleanIntrauterine device
US8435168 *Jul 16, 2007May 7, 2013Contipi Ltd.Apparatuses for the amelioration of urinary incontinence in females
US8617047Mar 16, 2006Dec 31, 2013Contipi Ltd.Apparatuses for the amelioration of urinary incontinence in females
US8651109Apr 2, 2009Feb 18, 2014Contipi Ltd.Pessaries for prolapse alleviation
US8662081Aug 16, 2010Mar 4, 2014Yale UniversityIntrauterine device
US8727961Mar 17, 2005May 20, 2014Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Apparatus for the prevention of urinary incontinence in females
US20090318750 *Jul 16, 2007Dec 24, 2009Contipi LtdApparatuses for the amelioration of urinary incontinence in females
US20130165743 *Feb 21, 2013Jun 27, 2013Con TIPI Ltd.Apparatuses for the amelioration of urinary incontinence in females
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/839
International ClassificationA61F6/14, A61F6/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F6/142, A61F6/148
European ClassificationA61F6/14B, A61F6/14E