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Publication numberUS3685308 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1972
Filing dateSep 22, 1969
Priority dateSep 22, 1969
Also published asCA939553A1
Publication numberUS 3685308 A, US 3685308A, US-A-3685308, US3685308 A, US3685308A
InventorsBurton R Lundquist
Original AssigneeBurton R Lundquist
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Chilling consumer size food packages
US 3685308 A
Abstract
A method of quickly lowering the temperature of a non-insulated consumer size prepackaged unfrozen food items comprising injecting a rapidly vaporizing coolant such as liquid nitrogen, carbon dioxide snow, liquid freons or the like, into a non-insulated consumer size package containing food, and thereafter closing the package, packing in suitable containers and storing in the usual manner such as in a freezer.
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United States Patent Lundquist [54] CHILLING CONSUMER SIZE FOOD PACKAGES [72] Inventor: Burton R. Lundquist, 1461 Cloverdale, Highland Park, 111. 60035 [22] Filed: Sept. 22, 1969 [21] Appl. N0.: 859,827

[52] US. Cl. ..62/60, 62/64, 99/1-98 [51] Int. Cl ..F25d 7/00 [58] Field of Search ..62/60, 62, 64, 384; 99/192,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 Harvey et a1. ..62/372 Brown et a1. ..99/ 192 Rueckert ..62/372 X 1 Aug. 22, 1972 2,978,336 4/ 1961 Morrison ..99/192 3,138,935 6/1964 Morrison ..62/64 3,368,363 2/ 1968 Alaburda et al. ..'...62/64 3,468,135 9/1969 Doll et a1. ..62/384 X Primary ExaminerWilliam E. Wayner Attorney-Edward T. McCabe and W. C. Davis [5 7] ABSTRACT A method of quickly lowering the temperature of a non-insulated consumer size prepackaged unfrozen food items comprising injecting a rapidly vaporizing coolant such as liquid nitrogen, carbon dioxide snow, liquid freons or the like, into a non-insulated consumer size package containing food, and thereafter closing the package, packing in suitable containers and storing in the usual manner such as in a freezer.

10 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure PATENTEDauszz m2 3.685.308

! IA/ VE N TUE .EU/E mm A LUNDZJUIST ATTUHNE Y CHILLIN G CONSUMER SIZE FOOD PACKAGES This invention relates to an improved method of chilling consumer size prepackaged food items, and in particular, a method of rapidly chilling prepackaged food items by directly contacting the food with vaporizing coolants which are below about 20 to about 320 F. such as obtained with liquid nitrogen (320 F), carbon dioxide snow (1 10 F.), liquid freons (20 F.) and the like, after it has been introduced into the usual non-insulated consumer size carton.

I propose that after the food item has been packed in the usual non-insulated consumer type carton e.g. for further wrapping, shipping and display purposes, that a suitable coolant such as liquid nitrogen, carbon dioxide snow, liquid freons or the like be sprayed into the in terior of the carton and onto the unfrozen product contained therein, and that thereafter the carton be closed in the usual manner. I have found it preferable, when using end-loading cartons to introduce the coolant into both ends of the container before the end flaps are closed although it is understood that one or both end flaps may be closed prior to the injecting of the coolant. I have also found it desirable for the carton to have a special opening or openings available into which the spray nozzles may be easily introduced. In using cartons which are immediately sealed such as with a wax overlay, polyethylene coated on one or both sides or a heat-sealed plastic wrapper, it may be desirable to either delay the final sealing of the carton or to provide for a suitable vent to prevent the build up of gas pressure.

Previous methods of chilling either resulted in excessive shrink due to the evaporation of moisture, or involved the use of special equipment and/or excessive handling of the product. Slow chilling may permit the development of microorganisms which subsequently cause spoiling of the product.

Therefore it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved method for rapidly and efficiently reducing the temperature of packaged food items.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a method for rapidly cooling prepackaged non-insulated consumer size food products without requiring special equipment or excessive handling.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following description and claims.

I have illustrated my invention diagrammatically in the accompanying drawing wherein the FIGURE is diagrammatic view.

Like-parts are indicated by like characters throughout the specification and drawing.

A carton 1 is shown as a partially opened receptacle in which rapidly vaporizing coolant is being applied directly to its contents. At each end bottom flaps 2 are folded across pairs of inwardly turned side panels 4. An opening 3 located at the top center of each bottom flap 2 has a coolant nozzle 5 extending therethrough. The product (not shown) in the package may be exposed directly to the coolant or incased within a protective cover such as a plastic liner. After injection of the coolant into the carton, top flaps 6 are closed over bottom flaps 2 thereby forming a seal over the openings 3.

One of the top flaps 6 may be closed prior to injection of the coolant although best results are generally obtained by injecting a predetermined amount of coolant into both ends of the package. In practice the coolant may be injected into the package through a jet mounted in the pressure plate of a carton-closing machine. The package would generally be sealed and packed in a shipping container, both of which act as an insulator to provide maximum efficiency for the coolant. The end-openingpackage is merely illustrative of the various types of packages that may be used in practicing this invention, but such packages have been found particularly advantageous because they permit a modification of the present method is that carbon dioxide snow may be deposited directly on the product in a top loading carton. The primary advantage of this modification is that it permits lower gas pressures which make the handling and control of the gas somewhat easier.

The following examples of methods of operating are given for the purpose of illustrating the present invention, but they are not intended to be limiting on the scope thereof.

EXAMPLE 1 One pound of fully cooked green-link sausage was loaded into an end-loading non-insulated consumer size carton at a temperature of -l00 F. The carton was then moved into the carton-closing machine, the side panels were folded in, the bottom flaps of the carton were folded upward; and sufficient carbon dioxide snow (approximately -1 10 F.) was introduced through an opening in the bottom flaps to lower the temperature to substantially below ambient or to about 36 F., and thereafter the top end fiaps were folded downward and sealed. A predetermined number of non-insulated consumer size cartons were then packed into a shipping container and moved to a freezer. It was found that the average time for reducing the tempera ture to 36-40 was 5-10 minutes.

Heretofore the filled consumer size cartons are usually packed in shipping containers and are placed in a blast-clod air freezer. It takes an average of 12-16 hours to lower the temperature from 80l 10 F. to 36-40 F. During this period of time spoilage organisms can multiply and thereby reduce storage life.

EXAMPLE II Product was prepared in the same manner as Example l except the coolant was liquid nitrogen (approximately -320 F.) was sprayed into the package. The result was similar to that attained in Example 1.

EXAMPLE Ill Hot buttered peas incased in a plastic bag were treated in the same manner as Example 11 with the result the product was cooled to 10 F. in about 8 minutes.

injecting of a rapidly vaporizing coolant of below I about F. directly onto a unfrozen food product prepacked in a non-insulated consumer size carton, said coolant being injected through a nozzle opening provided in said carton, said coolant being of such an amount to cool the product to a temperature substantially below ambient.

sealing the carton, and

packing a predetermined number of said cartons into a shipping container whereby both the cartons and shipping container act as an insulator to provide maximum efficiency for the coolant.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein the coolant is selected from the group of liquid freon, liquid nitrogen and carbon dioxide snow.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the temperature of the coolant ranges form about 350 to about 20 F.

4. The method of claim 1 wherein the coolant is liquid nitrogen.

5. The method of claim 1 wherein the coolant is carbon dioxide snow.

6. The method of claim 1 wherein the coolant is liquid freon.

7. The method of claim 1 wherein the prepackaged food product is encased in a plastic bag. and the rapidly vaporizing coolant is brought into direct contact with said bag.

8. The method of claim 1 wherein the coolant is injected simultaneously through nozzle openings provided in each end of the consumer size carton.

9. The method of claim 1 wherein the coolant is injected through a nozzle opening in one end of the carton and the opposite end of the carton having been previously sealed.

10. The method of claim 1 wherein the shipping container is stored in a freezer.

Patent NO. 3,685,308 Dated August 22, 1972 Inventor s) BURTON R It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

The patent should show on its face that it is assigned to Swift 80 Company of Chicago, Illinois.

Signed and sealed this 6th day of March 1973.

(SEAL) Attest-z EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM F'O-1OSO (10-69) USCOMM DC 6O376 p69 a u.s, covznumzm murmur; OFFICE: was o-ass-33A.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2278782 *Jun 23, 1939Apr 7, 1942HarveyContainer
US2890123 *Sep 30, 1955Jun 9, 1959Union Stock Yard And Transit CApparatus and method of preserving foodstuffs and the like
US2915235 *Oct 29, 1956Dec 1, 1959Swift & CoContainer for frozen foods
US2978336 *Jun 25, 1957Apr 4, 1961Liquefreeze Company IncMethod of preserving edible material
US3138935 *May 25, 1960Jun 30, 1964Liquefreeze Company IncMethod of chilling foodstuffs and the like
US3368363 *May 31, 1966Feb 13, 1968Du PontProcess for freezing food using liquid refrigerant
US3468135 *Jan 2, 1968Sep 23, 1969Doll Brendan LFood chilling using carbon dioxide refrigerant
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4594253 *Mar 21, 1984Jun 10, 1986Maurice FradinMethod for mincing and prepackaging minced meat under controlled atmosphere and temperature
US4921720 *Feb 27, 1989May 1, 1990Davis Edward EMethod for preparing food items from pig snouts and other similar material
US5366746 *Oct 4, 1993Nov 22, 1994Utah State University FoundationUltra-high temperature pasteurization and electron beam technology for sterilization of meat and meat products
US5494692 *Jun 1, 1994Feb 27, 1996Nestec S.A.Solidification of food surface by frosting with carbon dioxide snow, suction removal of snow residue prior to introducing higher density food
US5551207 *Oct 31, 1995Sep 3, 1996Nestec S.A.Apparatus utilizing CO2 snow for preparing layered food products
US5902618 *Mar 4, 1997May 11, 1999Haasis, Jr.; HansEfficient food chilling method
US6284298 *Dec 1, 1999Sep 4, 2001Harold S. MontgomeryTransferring partially frozen food pieces into series of storage containers; adding freezing gas into each container to further freeze; adding dry additives to partially frozen food pieces within each container; sealing and agitation
US6427481 *Sep 10, 2001Aug 6, 2002L'air Liquide Societe Anonyme A Directoire Et Conseil De Surveillance Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges ClaudeMethod and device for packaging carbon dioxide snow in a plastic film
US8935930Apr 26, 2007Jan 20, 2015L'air Liquide Societe Anonyme Pour L'etude Et L'exploitation Des Procedes Georges ClaudeUse of a mixture of carbon dioxide snow and liquid nitrogen in quick freezing applications
EP1856989A1 *May 18, 2006Nov 21, 2007L'AIR LIQUIDE, Société Anonyme pour l'Etude et l'Exploitation des Procédés Georges ClaudeUse of a mix of carbon dioxide snow and liquid nitrogen in deep-freeze applications
WO2007135308A1 *Apr 26, 2007Nov 29, 2007Air LiquideUse of a mixture of carbon dioxide snow and liquid nitrogen in quick freezing applications
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/60, 426/393, 62/64
International ClassificationF25D3/10, F25D3/12, B65B63/08
Cooperative ClassificationF25D3/10, F25D2400/30, B65B63/08, F25D3/12
European ClassificationF25D3/10, B65B63/08, F25D3/12
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 5, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SWIFT & COMPANY, (FORMERLY NAMES TRANSITORY FOOD P
Free format text: CONDITIONAL ASSIGNMENT;ASSIGNOR:SWIFT INDEPENDENT PACKING COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:003842/0177
Effective date: 19801027
Mar 2, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SWIFT INDEPENDENT PACKING COMPANY
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SWIFT & COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:003847/0067
Effective date: 19801024
Owner name: SWIFT INDEPENDENT PACKING COMPANY,ILLINOIS
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SWIFT & COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:3847/67
Owner name: SWIFT INDEPENDENT PACKING COMPANY, ILLINOIS