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Publication numberUS3685606 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1972
Filing dateAug 26, 1970
Priority dateAug 26, 1970
Publication numberUS 3685606 A, US 3685606A, US-A-3685606, US3685606 A, US3685606A
InventorsRobert H Blow Jr
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Timer-operated car starter
US 3685606 A
Abstract
A timer operated motor vehicle starter for starting a motor vehicle at a predetermined set time which system guards against theft by automatically closing down if the car doors are opened or if the gearshift lever is placed in a gear or drive position. A main feature of the starting system is that the vehicle throttle is automatically "pumped" if the engine fails to start after a predetermined number of seconds and if the engine still fails to start, the system closes down.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [151 3,685,606

Blow, Jr. [4 1 Aug. 22, 1972 [54] TIMER-OPERATED CAR STARTER 3,532,895 10/1970 Del Castillo ..290/38 R 72 I t I R 3,357,417 12/1967 Baumann ..290/38 R X 1 men 125 Southfidd 3,553,472 1/1971 Arlandson ..290/3s 3,308,305 3/1967 Morse, Jr ..290/38 R [73] Assignee: General Motors Corporation, 3,275,836 9/1966 Vancha ..290/38 R Detroit, Mich. 2,710,926 6/1955 Charles ..290/2 X [22] Filed: 1970 Primary Examiner-Benjamin Hersh [21] Appl. No.: 67,082 Assistant Examiner-John P. Silverstrim Att0rney-F, .l. Soucek and C. R. Engle [52] US. Cl. ..l80/114, 290/38 C 57 ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl ..F02n 11/06 [53 i ld f s h go gg 103 114; 290 2 3 R, A timer operated motor vehicle starter for starting a 290/38 C motor vehicle at a predetermined set time WhlCh system guards against theft by automatically closing [56] References Cited down if the car doors are opened or if the gearshift lever is placed in a gear or drive position. A main fea- UNITED STATES PATENTS ture of the starting system is that the vehicle throttle is automatically pumped if the engine fails to start 3 3 Braden et "5 after a predetermined number of seconds and if the 3 x 2: s gss gi engine still fails to start, the system closes down.

a e 3,414,734 12/1968 Konrad ..180/82 X 6 Clains, 3 Drawing Figures PATENTEDwszz 1972 INVENTOR. A oezz H fibw A TTOR NE Y TIMER-OPERATED CAR STARTER The present invention relates generally to motorvehicle starting systems and more particularly to a starting system that is initiated at a predetermined time set by the user of the vehicle.

An automatic starting system permits the user of a car to enter a warmed up vehicle before the time the vehicle is actually needed. In cold weather the heater and defroster can be set to operate. In hot weather a car equipped with air conditioning may be cooled off automatically so that the user need not enter a hot vehicle.

While a number of automatic engine starting systems have been proposed it is believed that the present system is an improvement over known systems in that it provides a novel throttle control means.

In the proposed system, a vacuum motor is provided to hold the throttle linkage partially open when the engine is not running. This permits the automatic choke to set itself as the vehicle cools. Normally the driver tor pedal. Should the engine not start after approximately 3 seconds of cranking, a delay relay causes the throttle solenoid to pump the throttle for an additional time period or until the engine starts. Should the engine not start after approximately 7 seconds, a second time delay relay causes the throttle to be held down for an additional period of time, approximately seconds. At the end of 12 seconds, should the engine fail to start, a third delay relay causes the starting sequence to terminate.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an automatic engine starter wherein the throttle of the engine carburetor is pumped if the engine fails to start after a predetermined time period.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide means for deenergizing an automatic engine starting system if the engine fails to start after the throttle has been automatically pumped for a predetermined period of time.

Still a further object is to provide means in an automatic engine starter system for preventing the system from being initiated unless the gearshift of the vehicle is in neutral or parked position.

Still a further object is to provide means for deenergizing an automatic starting system if the oil pressure in the engine is too low or if the water temperature exceeds a certain value.

The above and other objects of the present invention will become more apparent when read in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein;

FIG. 1 is a schematic circuit diagram of a preferred embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial elevational view of a carburetor having a throttle linkage in accordance with the present invention with the linkage in a first position; and

FIG. 3 is a partial elevational view of a carburetor having a throttle linkage in accordance with the present invention, with the linkage in a second position.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a timer 2 is connected through a timer switch 3 to a three position control switch 4 having normal, automatic" and accessory" positions as indicated. The control switch 4 is connected by conductors 5 and 6 to an ignition switch 7 and further connected by conductors 8 and 9 to a neutral switch 10 controlled by the gearshift lever (not shown).

' must set the choke by partially depressing the accelera- A relay and time delay circuit 12 is electrically connected to the control switch 4 by means of terminals 13, 14 and 15, to the ignition switch by the terminal 16 and to door jamb switches 17 by the terminal 18.

A first relay 20 is provided with single pole double throw contacts 22, 23 and 24 and single pole normally closed contacts 25 and 26. The coil of relay 20 has one end connected to contacts 23 and 25 and has its other end connected through conductor 27 and terminal 28 to a vacuum actuated switch 29. The vacuum switch 29 is connected to a source of vacuum such as the engine intake manifold. Contact 22 is connected through a diode D1 to terminal 16 and in turn to ignition switch 7. Contact 26 is connected to terminal 14 and through terminal 14 to the accessory contact of the control switch 4.

A second relay 30 has a pair of single pole normally open contacts 31, 32 and a pair of single pole normally closed contacts 33 and 34. The coil of relay 30 has one end connected to contact 33 and terminal 15 and its other end connected to contact 31, delay relays and 41, and contact 42 through conductor 43. Terminal 42 is connected to a water temperature switch 44. Contact 31 is connected through conductor 35 to the terminal 18 and to door jamb switches 17. Contact is grounded and contact 34 is connected to a source of power such as the vehicle battery.

A third relay 45 has single pole normally open contacts 46 and 47. The coil of relay 45 has one end grounded and the other end connected by conductor 48 to one terminal of an interrupting or flasher type switch 49 and toone terminal of a delay relay 50. Contact 46 is connected to terminal 51 and a throttle solenoid 52 for purposes hereinafter described. The contact 47 is connected to the source of voltage indicated above.

The relay and time delay circuit 12 includes five temperature responsive time delay relays 40, 41, 50, 55 and 60. Time delay relay closes after approximately 7 seconds from the time it is actuated. Relays 55, 60 and 40 close after approximately 3 seconds, and time delay relay 41 closes after approximately twelve seconds. Each of the five time delay relays operate on the l2-volt source which is the vehicle battery.

The normally open contacts of relay 40 are connected between the coil of relay 30 and the terminal 57 which latter terminal is connected to an oil pressure switch. The normally open terminals of relay 41 are connected between ground and the coil of relay 30. The normally open terminals of relay 50 are connected between the coil of relay 45 and the terminal 13 which in turn is connected to the ignition system. The normally open contacts of relay are connected between the flasher switch 49 and contact 24 of the relay 20. The normally closed contacts of relay 60 are connected between the flasher switch 49 and the terminal 61. Terminal 61 is connected in turn to a thermostat switch 62 which in turn is connected to the terminal 63 and the source of voltage.

The remaining parts of the system include the existing starting and ignition system which in turn includes the starter solenoid switch 7, the cranking motor 65, and the ignition coil 67.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3 the carburetor is provided with a fast idle cam 71 to normally maintain the choke fully open, a throttle linkage 72 including push rods 73 and 74 and an idle screw 75. A vacuum motor 76 is provided to hold the idle screw off the fast idle cam when no vacuum is applied to the motor 76 (see FIG. 2) and to permit the idle screw to engage the fast idle cam when the engine is running and vacuum is applied to motor 76 (see FIG. 3).

OPERATION During normal operation the relay 20 is actuated through the ignition switch via conductor 16, contact 16, diode D1, contacts 22, 23, the coil of the relay 20, conductor 27, contact 28 and the vacuum switch 29 to ground. Actuation of the relay 20 closes the contacts 23 and 24 and completes the cranking motor circuit including conductors 13', 16', terminal 13, contact 24 and contact 23 to the battery. When the vehicle engine starts, vacuum in the manifold reaches a value such that vacuum switch 29 opens and disconnects the coil of relay 20 from ground to deenergize the coil. Should the engine stall, the vacuum switch 29 would again close, energizing relay 20 and closing the cranking motor circuit to crank the engine.

With the control switch 4 in the automatic or accessory position and with actuation of the timer switch 3 the cranking motor circuit is completed through relay 20 as hereinbefore described, however, the circuit for relay 20 is completed through the normally closed contacts 33 and 34 of the relay 30. With switch 4 in the automatic or accessory position the circuit for relay 20 is completed through the timer switch 3, the automatic contacts of the control switch 4, the neutral safety switch 10, conductor terminal 15, terminals 33 and 34 of relay 30 to coil of relay at contact 25. Relay 20 will remain actuated until the vacuum switch 29 opens or until relay is energized. When relay 30 is energized, relay 20 is deenergized and the cranking circuit is opened. It should be noted that when relay 30 is energized contacts 31,32 form a holding circuit for the relay 30 and it cannot be deenergized until switch 4 is returned to its normal position or until timer switch 3 is opened.

Assuming the engine does not start within approximately three seconds, the time delay relay 55 closes completing a circuit from contacts 23 and 24 of the relay 20 through relay 55, flasher relay 49 and the coil of relay 45. Relay 45 is thereby automatically energized and deenergized. Contacts 46 and 47 of the relay 45 are connected through terminal 51 through the throttle solenoid 52 which solenoid in turn is intermittently actuated.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 3, throttle linkage push arm 74 is connected to solenoid 52 (not shown). Therefore, as the solenoid is intermittently actuated, the throttle assembly is pumped. The fast idle cam 71 is connected to the carburetor choke assembly via push arm 77. As illustrated in FIG. 2, with the engine not running the vacuum motor 76 is not operated and the idle screw 75 does not rest on the fast idle cam. The carburetor choke assembly is therefore permitted to position the idle cam for fast idle. Should the engine start, vacuum applied to motor 76 would permit the idle screw to contact the fast idle cam and maintain the idle setting set by the choke (see FIG. 3).

If the motor fails to start after seven seconds of cranking, time delay relay 50 closes bypassing time delay relay 55 and holds the throttle solenoid energized and the throttle is held open by the solenoid. If the engine does not start after approximately 12 seconds of cranking, the time delay relay 41 closes and energizes the relay 30 which, as heretofore mentioned, deenergizes relay 20 and the cranking circuit.

The relay 30 can also be energized by several safety devices. Should the engine overheat, a water temperature switch is closed which energizes relay 30 through conductor 43, terminal 42 and the water temperature switch 44.

An oil pressure switch 53 is connected to relay 30 through terminal 52 and a time delay relay 40. The delay relay permits the engine three to five seconds to build up oil pressure. After this time lapse, relay 30 will be energized to shut down the circuit if oil pressure is lost for any reason.

The relay 30 may also be energized by door jamb switches 17 through terminal 18 and the conductor 35. Should the car doors be opened the system shuts down preventing theft of the vehicle.

In addition a thermostat switch 62 is included in the system and mounted in some convenient location on or near the engine. The switch 62 senses when the engine has warmed up. The switch 62 then closes and completes the circuit to the throttle solenoid through the flasher switch 49 and the normally closed time delay relay 60. For approximately 3 seconds the throttle will be opened and closed to release the carburetor from a fast idle and permit the choke to open. Relay 60 then opens and remains open.

The timer switch itself may be made to open after a predetermined time. The actuator pin 3' which trips the timer switch may be caused to retract in about 15 to 20 minutes. When this happens, the entire unit shuts down. This prevents the engine from running an excessive length of time.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been described, it is obvious to one skilled in the art that certain modifications may be made to the system without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined by the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a timer operated motor vehicle starting system, the combination comprising a cranking motor, a first electromagnetic relay for energizing said cranking motor a timer means for energizing said first relay at a predetermined time, a second electromagnetic relay having a pair of normally closed contacts and a pair of normally open contacts, said normally closed contacts being connected in series with said first relay, a time delay relay in series with the coil of said second electromagnetic relay to actuate said second electromagnetic relay, whereby said normally closed contacts are opened and said first electromagnetic relay is deenergized and initiation of said cranking motor circuit is terminated, a throttle solenoid for actuating the carburetor throttle of said vehicle, first means for periodically energizing said throttle solenoid, time delay means for bypassing said first means and for constantly energizing said throttle solenoid, whereby, as said cranking motor is energized, said first means periodically energized said throttle solenoid for a first time period, should said vehicle fail to start in said first time period, said time delay means bypasses said first means and constantly energizes said throttle solenoid.

2. In a timer operated motor vehicle starting system as defined by claim 1, means for electrically connecting said normally open contacts of said second electromagnetically operated relay in series with the coil of said second relay whereby said relay remains energized for a predetermined period of time.

3. A timer operated motor vehicle starting system as defined by claim 1 wherein a vacuum actuated switch is provided in series with the coil of said first electromagnetic relay.

4. A timer operated motor vehicle starting system as defined by claim 1 wherein a water temperature sensitive switch for the engine of said vehicle is provided in series with the coil of said second electromagnetic relay.

5. A timer operated motor vehicle starting system as defined by claim 1 wherein switches actuated by the doors of said vehicles are electrically connected in series with the coil of said second electromagnetic switch.

6. A timer operated motor vehicle starting system as defined by claim 1 wherein a temperature responsive switch and a time delay relay are electrically connected in series with said means for periodically energizing said throttle solenoid.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2698391 *May 2, 1952Dec 28, 1954Marshall H BradenEngine control system
US2710926 *Feb 9, 1953Jun 14, 1955Emil F AutunovichStarter circuit
US3015037 *Mar 12, 1957Dec 26, 1961Larry C ParsonsAutomatic electric starting system
US3275836 *Mar 26, 1964Sep 27, 1966Frederick A MichaelsAutomatic engine starter
US3308305 *Aug 25, 1964Mar 7, 1967Electronic Dev Mfg CorpAutomatic starter for prime movers
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3862429 *Feb 14, 1973Jan 21, 1975Jeffry C BucherRemote starting system for diesel engines
US3929205 *Jan 9, 1974Dec 30, 1975Takata Kojyo CoThree point safety belt system with inertia actuated inflatable belts
US4227588 *Dec 6, 1978Oct 14, 1980Biancardi Michael JAutomatic vehicle starting apparatus
US4296334 *Sep 7, 1978Oct 20, 1981Gim WongProgrammable electronic starting device for autos and the like with means selectable to actuate accessories
US4481424 *May 5, 1982Nov 6, 1984Nippondenso Co., Ltd.Driving mechanism for vehicle engine and accessory
US4577599 *Sep 27, 1982Mar 25, 1986Brunswick CorporationRemote starter for internal combustion engine
US4596303 *May 1, 1984Jun 24, 1986Theodore TremblayAnti-theft device for motor vehicles
US5377641 *May 19, 1993Jan 3, 1995Salazar; Gerardo S.Timer-controlled start/stop device for an automobile
US5483107 *Jul 23, 1993Jan 9, 1996Xander; Wilmer R.Automatic defensive driving illumination system
US5646455 *Sep 11, 1995Jul 8, 1997Price; AlanTimer controlled heating and cooling apparatus for an automobile
US5656868 *Oct 12, 1995Aug 12, 1997Designtech International Inc.Remote vehicle starter for a standard transmission vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification180/286, 290/38.00C, 180/287, 180/271
International ClassificationF02N19/00, F02N11/08
Cooperative ClassificationF02N11/0811, F02N19/00, F02N11/101
European ClassificationF02N11/08A4, F02N11/10B, F02N19/00