Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3685645 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1972
Filing dateAug 17, 1970
Priority dateAug 17, 1970
Publication numberUS 3685645 A, US 3685645A, US-A-3685645, US3685645 A, US3685645A
InventorsKawaguchi Harold H
Original AssigneePhysio Control Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Defibrillation electrode pad and package therefor
US 3685645 A
Abstract
Absorbent pads soaked with a conductive solution are packaged in moistureproof packages in a manner which assures easy access to the pads under the emergency conditions normally associated with the use of defibrillation equipment. Two separate moistureproof containers in the form of plastic bags are sealed together with each bag containing a soaked pad. The two bags are so arranged and interconnected that the user can easily retrieve the pads for immediate application to the chest of a victim.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Kawaguchi [451 Aug. 22, 1972 [54] DEFIBRILLATION ELECTRODE PAD 2,887,] 12 5/ 1959 Smith ..l28/4l7 AND PACKAGE THEREFOR 1,411,077 3/1922 Balogh ..206/56 AA UX [72] Inventor: Harold H. Kawaguchi, Seattle,

wash- Primary Examiner-Leonard Summer [73] Assignee: Physio-Control Corporation, Seattle, Attorney-Christensen, and Matthews Wash.

[22] Filed: Aug. 17, 1970 [57] ABSTRACT [21] Appl. No.: 64,207 Absorbent pads soaked with a conductive solution are packaged in moistureproof packages in a manner [52] Cl 206/63 2 R 128/417 206/56 AA which assures easy access to the pads under the emer- 229/56 229/66 gency conditions normally associated with the use of 51 CLUUB6Sd 1/22 3 5 31/12 A6) 19/00 defibrillation equipment. TWO separate moistureproof 58 Field of Search ..206/63.2 R, 56 AA, 56 AB, containers in the form of Plastic bags are Sealed 47 12 /20 15 417 together with each bag containing a soaked pad. The two bags are so arranged and interconnected that the [56] References Cited user can easily retrieve the pads for immediate application to the chest of a victim. UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures 2,699,779 1/1955 Lustrg ..206/63.2 X

P'A'TENTEDwczz m2 INVENTOR. HAROLD H. M lk/4606M ATTORNEYS DEFIBRILLATION ELECTRODE PAD AND PACKAGE THEREFOR Defibrillation equipment of various types is well known at the present time and finds widespread usage in hospitals and is typically carried by emergency rescue vehicles. The defibrillation equipment basically includes a high energy output electric supply together with suitable electrodes for applying a large quantity of electrical energy to the chest of a victim whose heart has gone into fibrillation. In using such equipment it is important that the electrodes made good electrical contact with the chest of the patient so that the stored energy is actually delivered to the victim. Poor electrical contact can result in burning of the skin and also can prevent the application of the desired quantity of electrical energy to the victim.

It is typical in the art of defibrillating a patient to make use of an electrically conductive paste or jelly beneath the electrodes of the defibrillation equipment in order to achieve a low resistance electrical connection. However, such pastes and jellies present a problem in that they typically cause the electrodes to slide about the chest of the patient. When repeated defibrillation signals are required, it is found that the subsequent application of the electrodes to the slippery skin of the patient can present a problem. This is particularly true when the defibrillation is being attempted in the field or at a remote location where a person may have suffered the heart disorder. In those cases, as well as in the intensive care units of a hospital, it is extremely important that the defibrillation equipment be placed in operation at the earliest possible time if the life of the patient is to be saved. In order to overcome some of the problems associated with conductive jellies and pastes, pads of absorbent material such as surgical paper or cloth soaked in a saline solution have been utilized beneath the defibrillation electrodes. However a problem has been encountered in that such pads necessitate pre-soaking, which results in limited shelf life of the pads. A saline bath can also be made available so that the personnel using the defibrillation equipment can soak the pads at the time of defibrillating the patient. This of course adds to the time required to actually apply the defibrillation signals to a patient once the patient has been reached. The latter approach is also impractical in those cases where the defibrillation equipment is carried in an emergency vehicle which typically rushes to the scene of a fallen victim, with the personnel typically rushing from the vehicle with the defibrillation equipment in hand in order to apply the defibrillation signals to the victim at the earliest possible moment.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved defibrillation electrode pad and package.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a conductive pad assembly for defibrillation equipment with the conductive pad having an extended shelf life and with the package assembly assuring ready removal and separation of two pads.

In accordance with the teachings of the present in vention, a pair of pads soaked in a conductive solution are sealed inside of separate plastic bags with the plastic serving to prevent drying of the soaked pads. A saline solution works well for soaking the pads to make them good electrical conductors. Two such bars or packages are interconnected in a manner which facilitates the immediate removal of each of the pads by the user by tearing the bags at a predetermined location. By having two such separate bags interconnected, the user is always assured of having the required conductive pad for each of the electrode assemblies of the defibrillation equipment typically used at the present time.

The above and additional advantages and objects of the invention will be more clearly understood from the following description when read with reference with the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of a defibrillation electrode pad and package combination according to the invention laid out flat and showing electrode pads contained in pockets of the transparent package with a foldable and removable portion connecting the pockets.

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the pad and package combination shown in FIG. 1, showing the connecting portion being torn away to open the pockets for access to the pads in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 3 is an isometric view showing the folded connecting portion torn away leaving the pockets open along the severance lines.

FIG. 4 is a side view of another embodiment of the invention, with the package shown folded and having a curved tear line so that when the connecting portion is torn free a portion of the defibrillation pad is directly exposed for ease of removal.

The electrode pad and package combination shown in FIG. 1 consists of a substantially rectangular plastic package 10 having moistureproof pockets 12 and 14 at each end in each of which is contained an electrode pad 16, 18 soaked in a conductive solution, such as a saline solution. The pockets l2 and 14 are formed by opposite walls 20 and 22 bound together by heat or pressure welds along peripheral lines 24 and 26, 28 and 30. The foldable interconnecting portion 32 is bounded by scored tear lines 34 and 36 extending across the package with notches 38 at the ends of the tear lines to make it easier to start the tear under the emergency conditions surrounding use of the pads. The entire package is preferably constructed of a light plastic transparent material such as polyethylene which maintains its moistureproof character over a reasonably long period of storage time so that the pads are maintained moist for maximum electrical conductivity.

The tear lines 34 and 36 may be formed by the heat or pressure welds defining the separate pockets or bags in which the pads are contained, but it is preferred that separate tear lines be provided to assure that the pockets are left open for immediate removal of the pads, as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. Thus in the embodiments shown the tear lines 34 and 36 are positioned on opposite sides of weld lines 40 and 42 which extend across the connecting portion 32 and separate the pockets l2 and 14 so that the pads and solution contained therein will not move from one pocket to another. The tear lines 34 and 36 may be made before the package is assembled and do not destroy the waterproof characteristic of the package.

A modification of the tear lines for opening the pockets of the package is shown in FIG. 4 wherein tear line 37 is curved in the center downwardly beyond the edge of the electrode pad 18. Thus when the connecting portion 32 is removed the upper edge 19 of the electrode pad 18, and pad 16 on the opposite side, is exposed for easy gripping and removal of the pad.

The invention therefore provides a simple and easily constructed electrode pad and package combination which enables storage of pre-soaked electrode pads in a convenient manner and quick removal of the pads from the package under the emergency conditions occurring at the time such pads are needed.

What is claimed is:

1. A defibrillation electrode pad and package combination comprising:

a. a foldable package having two watertight pockets and a connecting portion therebetween;

b. said connecting portion being bendable along a transverse line whereby said package can be folded so that the pockets lie against one another;

c. said package further having a transverse tear line across each of said pockets and parallel to said transverse fold line whereby when folded said connecting portion can be torn away along said tear lines to open said pockets simultaneously; and

d. a defibrillation electrode pad soaked in an electrically conductive solution contained in each of said pockets.

2. A defibrillation electrode pad and package combination comprising a package having two watertight pockets and a connecting portion therebetween, said connecting portion being bendable along a transverse line and scored on each side of said transverse line whereby said pockets can be separated and opened simultaneously by tearing across said connecting portion, and a defibrillation electrode pad held in a conductive solution in each of said pockets.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein said connecting portion is scored along parallel lines intersecting the respective pockets and is foldable between said lines so that said pockets lie flat against one another and said connecting portion is thereby positioned along one edge of the package to be gripped and torn away to open said pocket simultaneously.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein said package is formed of plastic walls welded together along peripheral lines defining said pockets, and wherein a weld line extends across said connecting portion between said score lines.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein said score lines extend across an edge of the electrode pad contained in each pocket whereby said pads are exposed for gripping when said connecting portion is removed.

a: k a:

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1411077 *Dec 3, 1920Mar 28, 1922Balogh Frank OEnvelope
US2699779 *May 17, 1952Jan 18, 1955Jacob LustigWet dressing for medical uses
US2887112 *Aug 15, 1957May 19, 1959Sanborn CompanyPad for skin preparation for electrocardiography and the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3923042 *Sep 30, 1974Dec 2, 1975Medicor MuevekElectrical detector/transducer/applicable on the skin surface for biometrical observations
US3983994 *Jan 29, 1975Oct 5, 1976Ihor WyslotskyFlexible package
US4077397 *Mar 25, 1976Mar 7, 1978Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Diagnostic electrode assembly
US4166456 *Oct 6, 1977Sep 4, 1979Vaughn CorporationCarrier release sheet
US4252119 *Jun 13, 1979Feb 24, 1981The Kendall CompanyPack for moist patient therapy
US4327737 *May 15, 1980May 4, 1982Roman SzpurMedical electrode assembly
US4706680 *Jun 30, 1986Nov 17, 1987Nepera Inc.Conductive adhesive medical electrode assemblies
US4777954 *Jun 26, 1987Oct 18, 1988Nepera Inc.Conductive adhesive medical electrode assemblies
US4779630 *Sep 18, 1987Oct 25, 1988Katecho, Inc.Defibrillator pad assembly and method for using same
US4827932 *Feb 27, 1987May 9, 1989Intermedics Inc.Implantable defibrillation electrodes
US4903841 *Nov 16, 1988Feb 27, 1990Kabushiki Kaisha Hosokawa YokoPouch with superposed tear lines
US4911178 *Jun 2, 1988Mar 27, 1990Neal Carol APacemaker wire dressing
US4998536 *Dec 26, 1989Mar 12, 1991Kas Products, Inc.Defibrillator pad assembly and method for using same
US5040695 *Jul 6, 1990Aug 20, 1991W. R. Grace & Co.-Conn.Tear off hinge
US5076286 *Jul 2, 1990Dec 31, 1991Kas Products, Inc.Defibrillator pad assembly and method for using same
US5100000 *May 28, 1991Mar 31, 1992Packaging Innovations, Inc.Suspendable bag and support structure
US5102234 *Mar 25, 1991Apr 7, 1992Abner LevyMulti-pocket bag for medical specimen
US5402884 *Sep 24, 1992Apr 4, 1995Surviva Link CorporationMedical electrode packaging technology
US5462157 *Oct 28, 1993Oct 31, 1995Zmd CorporationElectrode package
US5575393 *Jul 28, 1995Nov 19, 1996Tc Manufacturing Co., Inc.Stack of cold welded headerless bags
US5579919 *Mar 27, 1995Dec 3, 1996Survivalink CorporationMedical electrode packaging technology
US5598919 *Aug 17, 1994Feb 4, 1997Allergan, Inc.Resealable contact lens pouch and method of using
US5697955 *May 10, 1996Dec 16, 1997Survivalink CorporationDefibrillator electrodes and date code detector circuit
US5753246 *Dec 2, 1996May 19, 1998Peters; Marlin W.Packaged germicidal towelette, sanitation kit and method for promoting hygiene
US5817151 *Jun 4, 1996Oct 6, 1998Survivalink CorporationCircuit detectable packaged medical electrodes
US5850920 *Sep 11, 1996Dec 22, 1998Survivalink CorporationMedical electrode packaging technology
US5868245 *May 15, 1996Feb 9, 1999Intermedics, Inc.Antiseptic disposables and methods for medical and surgical procedures
US5938068 *Apr 27, 1998Aug 17, 1999Dart ContainerContainer with removable cover
US5984102 *Mar 2, 1998Nov 16, 1999Survivalink CorporationMedical electrode packaging technology
US6029422 *Feb 8, 1999Feb 29, 2000Sulzermedica Usa, Inc.Antiseptic disposables and methods for medical and surgical procedures
US6115638 *Sep 14, 1998Sep 5, 2000Survivalink CorporationMedical electrode with conductive release liner
US6155714 *Dec 24, 1996Dec 5, 2000Rhone PoulencMulti-compartment packaging bag with carrying handle
US6305531 *May 25, 1999Oct 23, 2001Michael A. WilkmanReduced cost impregnated wipes
US6409385 *Nov 21, 2000Jun 25, 2002Aventis Cropscience S.A.Apparatus and method for packaging articles therein
US7069074 *Nov 7, 2001Jun 27, 2006Medtronic Emergency Response Systems, Inc.Easy-to-use electrode and package
US7438703Dec 6, 2001Oct 21, 2008Tyco Healthcare Group LpSafety shield for medical needles
US7603173 *Jul 5, 2006Oct 13, 2009Zoll Medical CorporationElectrode package attached to exterior of defibrillator
US7668604Jun 16, 2004Feb 23, 2010Conmed CorporationPackaging for medical pads and electrodes
US7797044May 5, 2006Sep 14, 2010Physio-Control, Inc.Easy-to-use electrode and package
US7828148 *Jun 3, 2004Nov 9, 2010Gibson James BMedication organizing system
US7900471May 27, 2008Mar 8, 2011S. I. IncorporatedPre-packaged, flexible container of ice and air
US8181777 *Jun 23, 2009May 22, 2012Kettenbach Gmbh & Co. KgTearable applicator packaging
US8594812Jul 27, 2012Nov 26, 2013Covidien LpElectrode pad packaging systems and methods
US9026230Nov 25, 2013May 5, 2015Covidien LpElectrode pad packaging systems and methods
US20020011424 *Sep 19, 2001Jan 31, 2002Wilkman Michael A.Reduced cost impregnated wipes
US20020072716 *Dec 6, 2001Jun 13, 2002Safety Syringe CorporationSafety shield for medical needles
US20030088276 *Nov 7, 2001May 8, 2003Covey Kevin KellyEasy-to-use electrode and package
US20040217038 *Jun 3, 2004Nov 4, 2004Gibson James B.Medication organizing system
US20050220941 *Mar 30, 2004Oct 6, 2005Bret SelbyPackaging apparatus
US20050283219 *Jun 16, 2004Dec 22, 2005O'connor Rose MPackaging for medical pads and electrodes
US20050284777 *Jun 23, 2005Dec 29, 2005Wilkman Michael AReservoir barrier wipes, pads and applicators
US20060206152 *May 5, 2006Sep 14, 2006Medtronic Emergency Response Systems, Inc.Easy-to-use electrode and package
US20070255380 *Apr 27, 2007Nov 1, 2007Peter MeyerElectrode pad packaging systems and methods
US20070274615 *Jun 18, 2004Nov 29, 2007Mars, Inc.Flexible Pouch With Tear Line
US20080009908 *Jul 5, 2006Jan 10, 2008Michael ParascandolaElectrode package attached to exterior of defibrillator
US20090293434 *May 27, 2008Dec 3, 2009S. I. Incorporated, Dba "Serv-Ice"Method of forming a pre-packaged, flexible container of ice and air
US20090293536 *May 27, 2008Dec 3, 2009S. I. Incorporated, Dba "Serv-Ice"Pre-packaged, flexible container of ice and air
US20090297691 *May 27, 2008Dec 3, 2009S. I. Incorporated, Dba "Serv-Ice"Method of serving a drink to a person
US20100018881 *Jun 23, 2009Jan 28, 2010Kettenbach Gmbh & Co. KgTearable Packaging
US20100063558 *May 5, 2006Mar 11, 2010Medtronic Emergency Response Systems, Inc.Easy-to-use electrode and package
US20130126388 *Nov 21, 2012May 23, 2013Anne HannahanMedical product package assembly
USRE39250 *Oct 31, 1997Aug 29, 2006Zoll Medical CorporationElectrode package
USRE40471Sep 25, 2002Aug 26, 2008Cardiac Science, Inc.AED with force sensor
EP0063013A1 *Apr 1, 1982Oct 20, 1982Cpc International Inc.Double bag with separate openings and process for its production
WO1995011843A1 *Oct 27, 1994May 4, 1995Zmd CorporationElectrode package
WO1995016621A1 *Dec 14, 1994Jun 22, 1995Smith & Nephew PlcMulti-component packaging system
WO2014064464A2Oct 25, 2013May 1, 2014Pibed LimitedMulti-component encapsulated reactive formulations
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/210, 206/438, 607/153, 383/38, 383/209
International ClassificationB65D75/30, B65D75/28, B65D75/52, B65D75/58, B65D81/32
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3261, B65D75/5805, B65D75/30
European ClassificationB65D81/32H, B65D75/58B