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Publication numberUS3687221 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1972
Filing dateMar 8, 1971
Priority dateMar 8, 1971
Publication numberUS 3687221 A, US 3687221A, US-A-3687221, US3687221 A, US3687221A
InventorsBonnard Michel Paul Rene
Original AssigneeBonnard Michel Paul Rene
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sound reproduction acoustic enclosure
US 3687221 A
Abstract
The present invention refers to an acoustic enclosure comprising a horn having resonant portions flexibly mounted, and deflecting means at a horn end.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Bonnard 1 Aug. 29, 1972 54] SOUND REPRODUCTION ACOUSTIC [56] mm Cited ENCLOSURE UNITED STATES PATENTS [72] Inventor: Michel Paul Rene Bounard, 2 ave.

1,836,222 12/1931 Bomne ..181/27 R Q, 9 Hem", 7 1,943,499 1/1934 Williams ..1s1/27 R 2,310,243 2/1943 Klipsch ..1s1/31 B 22 Filed: March a, 1971 2,476,572 7/1949 Wenzel ..1s1/31 B [211 APPl- 121,833 Primary ExaminerSt/ephen J. Tomsky Attorney-Young & Thompson 52 U.S. c1 ..1s1/31 11, 181/27 R I [51] 1m, 01 ..-....;.G101r 13/00, l-l04r 1/28 I ABSTRACT [58] Field of Search 181/31 B, 27 R, 31 R The present invention refers to an acoustic enclosure comprising a horn having resonant portions flexibly mounted, and deflecting means at a horn end.

5Claims,6DrawingFigures SOUND REPRODUCTION ACOUSTIC ENCLOSURE The present invention has reference to the technical field of sound reproduction and relates more particularly to a novel type of acoustic enclosure for a vibrating element such as a loud speaker or the like.

Known sound reproduction devices generally comprise a series or chain of members performing different functions, namely reading of the sound information as registered on a carrier, emission of a modulated signal, amplification and finally actuation of a vibrating element adapted to deliver sound radiations.

Obviously the final quality or faithfulness of the reproduction is in terms of the several members of which the chain is made up. It is therefore important that each of the elements of one and the same chain should have homogeneous functional characteristics. Now while considerable progresses have been achieved in the manufacture of recording carriers (such as records having microfurrows or stereophonic carriers) or in the production of reading or amplifying members, difficulties are encountered as regards vibrating elements to which so far no satisfactory solutions have yet been found.

Such difficulties are due to various causes among which one may cite those interferences between radiations emitted by the opposite faces of vibrating elements, also the formation of stationary waves in the enclosures and parasitic resonance phenomena which are generated in the walls of the casings or horns associated with the vibrating elements.

Known solutions for remedying such disadvantages (baffles, closed housing, anti-resonance enclosure, etc.) lead to complicated constructions the manufacturing cost of which is high or to very simple and cheap constructions the acoustic quality of which is generally poor. Moreover the quality of such equipments is always in terms of the volume of those enclosures that are used, which leads to fairly cumbersome stock.

The present invention has for its chief object the provision of an improved acoustic enclosure based on a complex conception but lending itself to an easy and cheap manufacturing possibility and which permits, moreover, with a limited volume to obtain a sound reproduction the quality of which is equal or better than the results that may be now obtained when using the best known equipements i.e., those having the largest size and of maximum costs.

Another object of the invention is to provide an acoustic enclosure or chamber permitting the achievement of a better efficiency and brightness of the vibrating elements by comparison with the characteristics obtainable with the same vibrating elements as used on conventional acoustic enclosures.

A further object of the invention considered according to its most general principle, is to provide an acoustic enclosure essentially characterized by the combination of at least one vibrating element, a horn and at least a deflecting member all located within the enclosure having at least one vent and so mutually arranged that the radiation emitted by the face of the vibrating element directed toward the inside of the enclosure undergoes from said deflecting member a change of shape and direction permitting said radiation to travel through the horn and to escape through the enclosure vent as an audible wave in phase with the radiation emitted by the face of the vibrating element directed toward the outside of the enclosure.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide an acoustic enclosure as above-stated wherein the horn is constituted by a blade of great length wound spirally and yieldingly or flexibly fitted between two opposite faces of the enclosure, the horn thus shaped being preferably exponential, its flexible mounting enabling it freely to acquire a resonant condition so that such horn fulfills three separate functions, namely first to amplify the sound wave by shaking step by step an increasingly large air volume, second to function like a resonator permitting by generating resonances mostly of audible frequencies to eliminate parasitic resonances, and third to slow down the wave owing to its reflection against the walls.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved acoustic enclosure wherein the deflecting member may be situated either between the inner face of the vibrating element and the neck (or input) of the horn or between the mouth (or output) of the horn and the enclosure vent whereby in the first case the deflector permits the wave emitted by the inner face of the vibrating element to penetrate into the horn while in the second case the deflector directs the horn wave outwards, the possibility being afforded in both cases, so to influence the deflector shape and the horn length as to cause the wave emitted through the vent to be in phase with the wave emitted by the outer face of the vibrating element.

With these and such other objects in view as will incidentally appear hereafter, the invention comprises the novel construction and combination of parts that will be now explained with reference to the accompanying drawings exemplifying the same and forming a part of the presentdisclosure.

FIG. 1 is a front sectional view of a first embodiment of an acoustic enclosure according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a side sectional view of the enclosure shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a detail view of a constructional form of the deflecting member.

FIG. 3a is a sectional view on the line aa of FIG. 3.

FIG. 4 is a front elevational view of an enclosure representing a modified embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a side view of the enclosure shown in FIG. 4.

In FIGS. 1 and 2 is represented an acoustic enclosure or chamber 1 of parallelepipedic shape carrying centrally of its front face 2 a loudspeaker 3 mounted upon a baffle 4. Inside the enclosure 1 is positioned a blade 5 which is spirally wound. Said spiral blade 5 is flexibly or yieldingly mounted upon the front face 2 and the rear face 6 of the enclosure 1 with interposition of a sheet of a supple material 7 to which it adheres to a sufficient extent to preserve its shape in spite of the vibrations, such material being for example cellular rubber, plastic foam or the like. The blade 5 and the walls 2, 6 of the enclosure 1 define an acoustic horn 8 the neck or input of which is located behind the loud speaker 3, said horn being directed toward a vent 9 provided on a side face 10 of the enclosure 1. v

Preferably though not necessarily the shape given to the horn 8 will be that of an exponential horn. It is important to notice that in an enclosure of reduced volume a blade 5 of great length may be accommodated and that the flexible mounting of said blade permits it freely to acquire a condition of resonance.

Between the face 11 of the loudspeaker 2 directed towards the inside of the enclosure 1 and the neck of the horn 3 is arranged a deflecting member 12 which is illustrated in detail in FIGS. 3 and 3a.

This arrangement permits the rear wave of the loudspeaker 3 to be reflected by the deflector 12 in a direction at right angles to its original direction and thus to be introduced into the born 8 through which it travels before going out through the vent 9.

In the constructional form shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the loud speaker 3 is situated on a side face 10 of the enclosure 1 adjacent the upper part of said face. However the vent 9 is situated on one face or on the two front and rear faces of the enclosure. The deflecting member 12 is situated adjacent the mouth of the horn 8 near the vent 9.

In this arrangement, the rear wave from the loudspeaker 3 flows directly through the neck of the born 8 and after having travelled through it undergoes a change of direction owing to the deflector 12 whereby it comes out through the vent 9.

It will be easily understood that the use of the wave emitted by that face of the vibrating element which is directed towards the inside of the enclosure, after it has travelled through a horn of great length, permits the achievement with an enclosure of reduced volume of a very strong amplification and consequently a considerable increase of the efficiency of the vibrating element.

The shape of the horn input and that of the deflector or deflectors is so calculated as to impart an adequate acoustic load to the vibrating element.

Furthermore the continuous variation right along the spirally wound blade of those variations that are undergone by its constitutive material permits the blade -to behave as a continuous resonator which takes a resonant condition for all frequencies within the audible range. All these resonances partake in a substantial increase of the enclosure efficiency by blanking off all parasitic resonances.

it should be noticed that the enclosure according to the invention may be made of miscellaneous materials ranging from the heaviest ones (metals) to the lightest ones (expanded polystyrene). The blade which constitutes the horn may be also made of a very light material such as a polyvinyl compound, or an impervious or other fabric.

Obviously the above-described embodiments of the invention merely constitute examples among others in the field of the combination of means according to the invention and numerous modifications in the shape of the several elements, their nature or their relative arrangement may be conceived without departing from the ambit of the invention and the scope of the subjoined claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A sound reproduction acoustic enclosure defined by opposite walls and including walled horn means, a phonetically vibrating element carried by one wall of the horn means, vent means formed in the enclosure, said horn means comprising an elongated blade-like member of resonant material wound upon itself and spanning the opposite walls of the enclosure, means flexibly mounting said blade-like member between said opposite walls, and sound-deflecting means inside the enclosure adjacent one end of said blade-like member, whereby sound radiations emitted by the inwardly directed face of said vibrating element are subjected to shape and direction change and emitted through said horn means wherein said radiations are amplified and sustained by the resonances generated by the blade-like member prior to their escape through said vent means as an audible wave in phase with radiations emitted by the outwardly directed face of the vibrating element.

2. A sound reproduction acoustic enclosure defined by opposite walls and including walled horn means, a phonetically vibrating element carried by one wall of the horn means, vent means formed in at least one wall of the enclosure, said horn means comprising an elongated blade-like member of resonant material spirally wound upon itself and spanning the opposite walls of the enclosure, means flexibly mounting said blade-like member between said opposite walls, and sounddeflecting means inside the enclosure positioned behind said vibrating element at the input end of said horn means whose output end is in direct coincidence with said vent means.

3. A sound reproduction acoustic enclosure defined by opposite walls and including walled horn means, a phonetically vibrating element carried by one wall of the horn means and so arranged as to emit inner radiations directly into said horn means, vent means formed in at least one wall of the enclosure, said horn means comprising an elongated spirally wound blade-like member of resonant material of continuously varying curvature spanning the opposite walls of the enclosure, means flexibly mounting said blade-like member between said opposite walls, and sound-deflecting means of curved triangular or clover leaf shape inside the enclosure, said deflecting means being positioned behind said vibrating element intermediate the mouth of the horn means and the vent means.

4. A sound reproduction acoustic enclosure defined by opposite walls and including walled horn means of exponential outline, a phonetically vibrating element forming a loudspeaker carried by one wall of the horn means and so arranged as to emit its radiations directly into said horn means, a baffle-like partition supporting said vibrating element, vent means formed on both walls of the enclosure, said horn means comprising a spirally wound elongated blade-like member spanning the opposite walls of the enclosure, means flexibly mounting said blade-like member between said opposite walls, and sound-deflecting means located inside the enclosure behind said vibrating element intermediate the mouth of the horn means and the vent means.

5. A sound reproduction acoustic enclosure defined by opposite walls and including walled horn means, a phonetically vibrating element carried by one wall of the horn means, vent means formed in at least one wall of the enclosure, said horn means comprising a bladelike member of resonant material of fairly great length spirally wound in coiled fashion and spanning the opposite walls of the enclosure, means flexibly mounting said blade-like member between said opposite walls, and sound-deflecting means inside the enclosure positioned along the rear face of said vibrating element adjacent the entrance of said horn means, the various components of the enclosure including the horn means being made of a very light and supple material.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1836222 *Sep 12, 1927Dec 15, 1931Bonine Charles ESound reproducer
US1943499 *Apr 6, 1928Jan 16, 1934Rca CorpSound amplifier
US2310243 *Feb 5, 1940Feb 9, 1943Ray L SmithHorn for loud-speaker
US2476572 *May 1, 1946Jul 19, 1949Wenzel James JLoudspeaker cabinet with plural partitions forming labyrinth
Referenced by
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US3917024 *Oct 26, 1973Nov 4, 1975Kaiser Jr Julius ASound radiating structure
US5751827 *Mar 13, 1995May 12, 1998Primo Microphones, Inc.Piezoelectric speaker
US6648098 *Feb 28, 2002Nov 18, 2003Bose CorporationSpiral acoustic waveguide electroacoustical transducing system
US6973994Nov 4, 2002Dec 13, 2005Mackin Ian JApparatus for increasing the quality of sound from an acoustic source
US7051835 *Feb 11, 2002May 30, 2006Genelec OyBass-reflex loudspeaker system and method of manufacturing the same
US7201252 *Sep 12, 2002Apr 10, 2007B & W Loudspeakers LimitedLoudspeaker systems
US7284638 *May 8, 2006Oct 23, 2007Sahyoun Joseph YLoudspeaker low profile quarter wavelength transmission line and enclosure and method
US8064627Oct 21, 2008Nov 22, 2011David MaeshibaAcoustic system
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US8205712 *Sep 18, 2008Jun 26, 2012Dickie Laurence GeorgePorted loudspeaker enclosure with tapered waveguide absorber
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US8810426Apr 27, 2014Aug 19, 2014Gary Jay MorrisLife safety device with compact circumferential acoustic resonator
US8925676 *Jun 7, 2013Jan 6, 2015Jda Technology LlcPorted audio speaker enclosures
US9179220Jul 9, 2013Nov 3, 2015Google Inc.Life safety device with folded resonant cavity for low frequency alarm tones
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US20090084624 *Sep 18, 2008Apr 2, 2009Dickie Laurence GeorgePorted loudspeaker enclosure with tapered waveguide absorber
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US20120061174 *Nov 21, 2011Mar 15, 2012David MaeshibaAcoustic system
US20120228050 *Sep 14, 2010Sep 13, 2012Ghenadie BulatHelmholtz resonator for a gas turbine combustion chamber
US20130327585 *Jun 7, 2013Dec 12, 2013Jda Technology LlcPorted audio speaker enclosures
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DE19852803C1 *Nov 16, 1998Sep 21, 2000Joachim AhlbornBass reflex loudspeaker has bass tone horn with its mouth orthogonal to membrane of horn driver and its neck extended in horn driver direction
EP1335629A2 *Jan 13, 2003Aug 13, 2003Bose CorporationSpiral acoustic waveguide electroacoustical transducing system
WO2005104607A1 *Apr 12, 2005Nov 3, 2005Loewe Opta GmbhBass reflex tube for loudspeakers
Classifications
U.S. Classification181/180, 181/191, 181/182
International ClassificationH04R1/28, H04R1/30, H04R1/22
Cooperative ClassificationH04R1/2865, H04R1/30
European ClassificationH04R1/28N13L, H04R1/30