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Publication numberUS3688678 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1972
Filing dateJan 4, 1971
Priority dateJan 4, 1971
Publication numberUS 3688678 A, US 3688678A, US-A-3688678, US3688678 A, US3688678A
InventorsDalen Merle L
Original AssigneeSignetics Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Photographic roll film processing apparatus
US 3688678 A
Abstract
A series of deep tanks and a film carriage insertable therein, the carriage having a plurality of interconnected perforated fins arranged partially within a sleeve to form a plurality of film compartments in which films are downwardly suspended during processing in the tank. A light-tight tank lid engages the carriage, and when rotated rotates the carriage, thereby agitating processing fluid in the tank. A duct extends downward between the fins of the carriage to receive a thermometer or water hose therein. An aperture in the tank lid communicates with the duct, and a collar encircling the lid aperture on the inside of the lid slips into the duct to form a light-tight seal. A plate is affixed to the lower ends of the fins at a short distance from the lower open end of the duct, permitting water flowing down the duct and against the plate to spread upward into the film compartment without forcing the carriage from the tank.
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Dalen [54] PHOTOGRAPHIC- ROLL FILM PROCESSING APPARATUS [72] Inventor: Merle L. Dalen,Rochester, Minn.

[73] Assignee: Signetics Corporation, Sunnyvale,

Calif.

22 Filed: Jan. 4, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 103,538

[52] U.S.Cl. ..95/96, 95/100, 134/143, 134/162 51 int. Cl. ..G03d 13/03 [58] Field of Search ..95/89 R, 90.5, 93, 96, 97,

[561 References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS I 1,623,703 4/1927 Ruff ..134/157 R X 3,332,333 7/1967 Williams... ..95/93 3,173,352 3/1965 Lane ..95/93 X 1,131,817 3/1915 Botz ..95/98 2,122,916 7/1938 Parker ..95/98 X 902,940 Ill 1908 Carkhuff ..95/ 100 X 3,452,664 7/ 1969 Shapiro et al ..95/100 X FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 7/1953 W Germany.... .....95/96 1 Sept. 5, 1972 Palmatier, Herman H. Bains and Malcolm L. Moore [57] ABSTRACT A series of deep tanks and a film carriage insertable therein, the. carriage having a plurality of interconnected perforated fins arranged partially within a sleeve to form a plurality of film compartments in which films are downwardly suspended during processing in the tank. A light-tight tank lid engages the carriage, and when rotated rotates the carriage, thereby agitating processing fluid in the tank. A duct extendsdownward between the fins of the carriage to receive a thermometer or water hose therein. An aperture in the tank lid communicates with the duct, and a collar encircling the lid aperture on the inside of the lid slips into the duct to form a light-tight seal. A plate is affixed to the lower ends of the fins at a short distance from the lower open end of the duct, permitting water flowing down the duct and against the plate to spread upward into the film compartment without forcing the carriage from the tank.

15 Claims, 8 Drawing Figures PATENTEDsEP 51912 SHEET 1 BF 2 DEVELOPER INVENTOR.

MEPZE 1.2446

PHOTOGRAPIIIC ROLL FILM PROCESSHQG APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to black and white or color photographic roll film processing equipment, the invention being designed for the film processer who requires simultaneous processing of a number of rolls of film but whose relatively low overall film processing volume does not justify acquisition of an expensive automatic processing machine.

Although numerous film processing devices are dozens of film rolls per day, this volume cannot justify purchase of an automatic processing machine costing thousands of dollars. Yet in businesses requiring a moderately active darkroom, such as newspapers, wireservices, commercial photographers, and the like, the presently accepted reel tank is inordinately slow and inefficient. The manually operated, relatively inexpensive processing apparatus disclosed herein can handle this moderate volume of roll film rapidly and efficiently and is badly needed in such businesses.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The invention comprises a deep tank and film carriage insertable therein, the carriage having a sleeve partially containing a plurality of perforated fins which divide the sleeve into individual film compartments.

Film is downwardly suspended in each compartment from a film supporting hook located at the upper end of the compartment, and the loaded carriage immersed in a succession of deep tanks containing developer, wash,

in the lid is aligned with the carriage duct to permit the insertion of a thermometer when the lid is in place. A collar on the inside of the lid surrounds the aperture and mates with the duct to prevent entry of light.

When a loaded carriage has been immersed in developer for the proper time, the carriage is manually lifted from the developer tank and inserted in a like tank containing water. The water hose is inserted in the carriage duct and water flows through the duct to the tank bottom and then upward through the film compartments, spilling over the edge of the tank and draining. into a sink. After this 'washing has removed the developer from the film, the carriage is immersed in the tank of fixer. Thereafter the film is washed again and then the carriage and film are permitted to dry after which the film is printed.

The invention provides a relatively inexpensive apparatus for roll film processers who have reasonable film volume but do not need the expensive, high volume automatic film processing equipment presently available.

The apparatus is easily installed in any darkroom; it requires no plumbing alterations and occupies no sink space. It requires little maintenance or cleaning and is simple and convenient to use.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS,

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of thefilm processing apparatus installed in a darkroom sink.

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view in cross section of the film carriage and deep tank, a tank lid being aligned with the top of the tank and carriage.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the film carriage of FIG. 2 showing roll film downwardly suspended into the tank.

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional side view of the apparatus of FIG. 3 taken along cutting plane 4-4.

FIG. 5 is a side view taken along arrows 55 of FIG. 4 and showing a film weight used with the invention.

FIG. 6 is a bottom view of the tank lid of FIG. 2 taken along arrows 6-6.

and fixer. The carriage can be rotated within the tank,

the perforated fins permitting processing fluid to circulate throughout the carriage.

The film carriage typically has two to four film compartments. With a four compartment carriage up to eight films can be processed simultaneously. Most roll film is manufactured with the film width slightly curved, the photosensitive emulsion being located on the concavely curved side. The film edges contact the film compartment walls, but due to the shape of the compartments and the film curvature the emulsion surface can incur no damage in the compartment.

A duct extends downward from the carriage top, terminating near a circular plate which is attached to, but spaced from, the fins. During processing a water hose or thermometer can be inserted in the duct to wash the film or measure fluid temperature. Water directed against the plate spreads outward and upward into the film compartment; since the water flow is intercepted by the plate and does not strike the tank bottom the carriage is not forced from the tank.

Carriage rotation is accomplished by rotating a lighttight carriage-engaging lid which fits over the tank opening. A bearing on the tank bottom rotatably supports the carriage and enhances rotation. An aperature FIG. 7 is a top view of a second embodiment of the carriage with three film compartments.

DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION OF THE INVENTION FIG. 1 shows the film processing apparatus 10 installed in a darkroom counter 12. The apparatus 10 has deep tanks l4, l6, and 18, containing developer, water, and fixer, respectively. The tanks rest on the floor 20 of the counter and are laterally supported by spacer 22. The upper ends of the tanks pass through both the countertop 24 and a slanted runoff board 26 which fits snugly about the tanks. A tank lid fits any of the shown tanks and provides a light-tight seal when placed thereon. A sink 30 has a faucet 32 which is provided with a water hose 34. The apparatus 10 mounts conveniently in the countertop, requires no plumbing alterations, and occupies no sink space. For darkroom installations having a sink which is not recessed in the counter 12 and instead is supported in the counter by legs, the apparatus 10 can be arranged to clip onto the ledge of the sink in an out board position.

A film carriage 36, shown in detail in FIGS. 2-4, has interconnected fins 38, 40, 42, and 44 all of which have perforations 46 therethrough. An outer sleeve 48 extends from beyond the lower ends of the fins to approximately midway their length. The outer diameter of sleeve 48 is slightly smaller than the inner diameter of tanks 14, 16, and 18 so the carriage 36 can be inserted within the tanks, the lower end 50 of the sleeve being just above the tank bottom 52.

1 The fins 38, 40, 42, and 44 divide the sleeve into four individual film compartments 39, 41, 43, and 45 (FIG. 3). Each compartment has a film supporting hook 47 on which a film clamp 49 can be hung adjacent the upper end of the carriage. It should be noted that the fins and sleeve provide a compartment interior surface against which the film edges may rest when film is hung from hook 47. The photographic emulsion on a film suspended from the hook 47 will not contact the interior surface of the film compartment because the angled or concavely curved characteristic of the compartment interior permits only the edges of the film to touch the interior surface of the compartment. Although many films have a curvature of their own which reduces contact between photographic emulsion and film compartment surfaces, such film curvature cannot be depended upon. Hence the design of the film compartments herein deliberately encourage edge contact between film and compartment interior walls but discourage contact between emulsion and wall. The design thus protects the emulsion whether or not the film has any curvature of its own.

A bail handle 51 extends between fins 38 and 42, its central section 53 curved to circumvent the duct 54 thereby permitting the insertion of hose 34 or thermometer 35 into the duct. The handle 51 cooperates with the lid 70, described hereafter, so that rotation of lid 70 rotates carriage 36.

Referring now to FIG. 3 the four interconnected fins 38, 40, 42, and 44 of film carriage 36 define a central duct 54 substantially centered on the central axis of the sleeve 48, beginning at the upper ends of the fins and terminating a short distance from their lower ends. The interior diameter of the duct 54 is selected to permit a snug fit between the duct and hose 34 so that when the hose is inserted therein, it will not readily escape from the duct. Alternatively, if a smaller hose is to be used, the duct interior may be provided with one or more projecting studs to better retain the hose therein. The duct diameter is, of course, large enough to accept thermometer 35. The duct need not be centered on the sleeve axis.

In the carriage 36, the planes of the fins are parallel to the sleeve axis and the fins extend radially from the 7 axis, being separated by equal polar angles. These relationships, while helpful, are not essential.

A bearing 56 at the tank bottom 52 rotatably supports a circular plate 58 affixed to the lower ends of the fins and spaced from duct 54 and from the inner periphery 60 of the sleeve 48. The plate 58 may be provided with a plurality of perforations to permit fluid to pass upward therethrough when the carriage is inserted in the tanks.

The tank 14 may be constructed of metal or plastic;

the particular material selected should be chemically inert to processing fluids. Stainless steel or polyvinyl chloride are acceptable materials..Typically the tank is round in cross section and approximately .40 inches long with aninner diameter of four inches, although these dimensions are only illustrative and can be varied without affecting the operation of the invention. The tank contains about two gallons of processing fluid which is adequate to insure long term chemical stability without major cost. A small floating lid 62 can be placed on the tanks of processing fluid and (FIG. 1) prevents excessive fluid evaporation or oxidation. If desired, more than three tanks can be used with the invention for such purposes as an additional wash tank or a separate wetting agent tank although such additions are not essential. In addition, if the apparatus is used for color film processing a larger number of additional tanks can be utilized for the additional chemical solutions required for such processing.

The film carriage 36 may also be made of metal 0 plastic, stainless steel being satisfactory. The precise measurements of the carriage are not important nor is the sleeve length. The sleeveshould be long enough to confine the lower ends of the film when the carriage is transferred from tank to tank and to prevent them wedging between carriage and tank when the carriage is rotated. Typically the sleeve is of circular cross section although this is not essential to its effective operation. Since the carriage is essentially immune to damage from processing chemicals, its sturdy construction assures long service and minimal maintenance.

FIGS. 2 and 6 show a light-tight lid positionable on the rim 72 of tank 14. A rim engaging annular channel 74 is defined by the outer edge 76 of the lid and a circular flange 78 of slightly smaller diameter than the edge. An aperture 80 through the lid 70 is surrounded by a collar 82 arranged to slip into the duct 54 when the lid is in place on the tank. The collar 82 and the light seal formed by outer edge 76 and flange v78 prevent entry of light into the tank when the tank rim 72 slides into annular channel 74.

Annular bail channel 84 encircles the collar 82, and a plurality of ridges 86 define six equally spaced radial channels extending from the bail channel 84 to the inner edge of flange 78. The arrangement of radial channels and hail channel 84 constitute carriage engaging apparatus and permit bail handle 51 to be engaged therein, the central curved section 53 of the handle fitting along bail channel 84 and the straight segments of the bail lying within two of the radial channels as shown by dotted lines 88 (FIG. 6). Thus when the lid 70 is in place on the tank 14 the bail 51 is engaged by the light-tight lid 70 permitting the film carriage 36 to be rotated turning the lid. By such rotation the processing solution in the tank can be agitated without admission of light.

Referring now to FIGS. 3 and 4 a conventional film clamp 49 holds the two ends 90 and 92 of film 94 which may be a 36 exposure 35 millimeter film; the loop 96 of the film 94 is weighted with loop weight 98, described hereafter, to hang downwardly in film compartment 41. The cross section of film 94 is shown as curved, the photosensitive emulsion being on the concave surface. Due to the shape of the already described interior of the film compartment the edges 100 and 102 of the film 94 contact the wall of the film compartment, assuring no damage to the emulsion. The film curvature when present provides additional, though unnecessary, protection against emulsion damage resulting from contact between film emulsion and compartment interior wall. Loop weight 98 rests on the non-emulsion side of the film and produces no processing problems or damage whatever.

Referring now to FIG. 5, a metal loop weight 98 having an essentially rectangular configuration has a narrow slot 99 through. which film 94 can be inserted within the loop weight 98. The weight acts to retain the looped lower end of an oversize film within the film compartment.

In film compartment 45 two short films 104 and 106, such as 20 exposure 35 millimeter films, are shown hung between a single pair of identical film clamps 49.

The photosensitive emulsions 103 and 105 of films 106 and 104 respectively face outwardly and in opposite directions from one another. The film compartment design permits only the film edges to contact the film compartment sides thus preventing emulsion damage.

The four compartment film carriage 36 is well suited for processing 35 millimeter film. Up to eight rolls of 20 exposure film can be processed simultaneously in the carriage. The carriage can handle essentially any commercially available roll film. It can handle up to four 120 rolls simultaneously.

A second embodiment of the film carriage, shown generally at 111 in FIG. 7 has three interconnected fins 112, 114, and 116, all with perforations like those shown at 46 in FIG. 2, dividing sleeve 118 into three film compartments 119, 121, and 122 each of which is designed to encourage only edge contact between film and compartment wall to thereby prevent emulsion damage. The outer edges of the fins contact the inner periphery 124 of the sleeve 118 which, like the sleeve 48 of FIG. 2, extends approximately midway the length of the fins. A duct 126 extends downward from the upper ends of the fins terminating at a short distance from a plate 128 which is affixed to the lower ends of the fins. The plate 128 may be perforated if desired, just as plate 58 of carriage 36 was perforated. An annular gap 130 between plate 128 and sleeve inner periphery 124 permits processing fluid to flow into the compartments as the carriage is lowered into a deep tank.

Each compartment has a film supporting hook 132 at the upper'end thereof for hanging a film clamp 49. A bail handle 134 extends between fins 114 and 116, its central section 135 curved to circumvent the duct 126, so processing equipment like hose and thermometer can be inserted therein. The handle 134 is engageable by the radial channels and annular bail channel 84 of lid 70 so the carriage 1 11 can be rotated in response to lid rotation. The film carriage 111 with its large film compartments can accommodate a maximum of six roll films, but the films may be wider in size than permitted by carriage 36. Any standard size roll film including 220 and 116 sizes is easily accommodated therein. As with carriage 36, two films can be placed back to back and accommodated in a single compartment; an overly long film can be looped as shown in FIG. 4.

Referring now to FIG. 8 a third embodiment of the film carriage, shown generally at 140, has perforated fins 142 and 144 forming compartments 146 and 148 separated by ducts 150 and 152 which extend from the top of the finsand terminate a short distance from plate 154 which is affixed to the lower ends of the fins and may, if desired, be perforated. An annular gap 155 between plate 154 and the inner periphery 156 of sleeve 145 permits fluid to flow upward into the film compartments as the carriage 140 is lowered into a deep tank. Each compartment has a film supporting hook 158 at the upper end thereof on which a film clamp 49 can be hung. A bail handle 160 having a central curved section 161 which fits within the already described channels of lid extends between ducts 150 and 152, so that carriage can be rotated when the lid 70 engages the bail and is rotated.

FIG. 1 shows a film clamp 49 gripping two films 163 and 164 which are suspended into compartment 148. Arcuate cross sections of fins 142 and 144 have their concave surfaces forming interior surfaces of the film compartments so as to permit the edges of a film to contact the interior of the compa'rtment'but prevent contact between emulsion and compartment. Film curvature, when present, further assures that onlythe film edges contact the walls of the compartment. Carriage 140 can accommodate any size of roll film commercially available.

Either or both ducts or 152 can be used for insertion of hose 34 and thermometer 35. If desired, an inert gas under pressure can be bubbled down one or both of the ducts to agitate the fluid. A distribution grid may be used to better distribute the gas bubbles. Nitrogen is acceptable as the gas since it does not react chemically with photo processing fluid.

Although none of the carriages shown herein have more than four compartments, it should be understood that more than four could be utilized in a single carriage, and carriages with greater numbers of compartments are contemplated as being within the scope of the invention.

In operation, exposed rolls of film are unwound in a darkroom and those which have lengths less than the film compartment of carriage 36 (FIGS. 2-4) are clamped at opposite ends, lowered into the compartments and one of the clamps 49 hung from the hook 47 of the compartment. No further film handling is needed during the entire processing operation.

The weight of the lower clamp 49 (FIG. 4) keeps the film extended into the compartment. If more than four such films require processing two films can be clamped back to back between a single pair of clamps as shown in FIG. 4 and hung in a single compartment so long as neither. film is longer than the compartment. The design of the interior surfaces of the film compartment assures that film'emulsion will not contact the sides of the compartments. Carriage 36 can simultaneously hold up to 8 such films in the shown four film compartments, and after they are loaded the eight can be processed with no more difficulty than one.

If film length exceeds the compartment length, the operator can cut ofi a few inches of film leader if the extra length is slight. If not, the film can be doubled up and the opposite ends clamped together by a single clamp 49 (FIG. 4). A loop weight 98 is inserted at the loop 96 of the weight; the weight keeps the film downwardly directed. The film is inserted in compartment 41 of carriage 36 and the clamp hung on hook 47.

carried on in a darkroom. The invention eliminates the tedious chore of winding a film into the curving passages of the prior art reel tank and substantially reduces film handling.

The film carriage 36 can now be inserted into deep tank 14 (FIG. 2) containing developer and the lighttight lid 70 inserted thereon, engaging bail handle 51 of carriage 36 in the channels of the lid. Preferably, the carriage 36 is lowered slowly into the tank permitting the processing fluid to enter the compartments as it descends. It should be noted that the operator is not required to pour or transfer any chemical solutions once the tanks have been filled, thus greatly diminishing spilling, overflow, and the like. The two 'gallon tanks assure long chemical life and high quality negatives.

After the carriage is fully immersed in the tank and the lid in place, the operator begins timing the developing period; at this stage in the processing the closed tank and carriage may, if desired, be moved to a nondarkroom atmosphere for the remainder of processing.

The operator manually rotates the light-tight lid 70 thereby causing the bail 51 to rotate carriage 36 about bearing 56 to agitate the fluid from compartment to compartment, passing through the perforations 46. The length of time the film is exposed to the developing solution is determined by the particular type of film and the temperature of the developing solution. A thermometer 35 may be lowered into the processing fluid through lid aperture 86 and duct 54 to check the fluid temperature. a

After the required developing time has passed, the lid 70 is-removed and carriage 36 slowly raised from the tank, letting the developing solution drain off.

The carriage 36' is next lowered into tank 16, which 2 contains water. The water hose 34, connected to faucet 32, is inserted into the upper opening of duct 54 and the water turned on at a convenient flow rate typically from 2-6 gallons per minute. Water flows through hose 34 and down duct 54 where it strikes plate 58 and spreads outward flowing upward through the individual compartments and eventually overflowing the tank 16 onto the slanted runoff board 26 and thence into the sink 30. This water flow provides complete washing of the film in the carriage and removes all developing solution while requiring little operator attention, no carriage rotation being necessary during the washing.

The film carriage 36 can now be withdrawn from the washing tank 16 and immersed in the final tank 18 containing fixer. The carriage 36 should be rotated in the fixer tank 18; this can be done by the operator rotating bail handle 51 to agitate the fixer and circulate it through the perforations 46 of the fins. Alternatively, the lid 70 can be replaced and it rotated to turn the carriage. When fixing has been completed, the carriage 36 is withdrawn from the tank 18 and lowered into the wash tank 16 where the washing operation, already described, is repeated again.

If the three compartment carriage 111 ortwo compartment carriage 140 is used in place of the four compartment carriage 36, operation is essentially the same as that described for the carriage 36, the only difference being that a lesser quantity of film can be developed in the two and three compartment embodiments.

' All of the foregoing loading steps should of course be If desired, each deep tank 112, 114, and 116 may be provided with its own film carriage, and instead of moving one carriage from tank to tank,- as has been described, the films can be moved from tank to tank and the carriages left in position. This procedure is particularly advantageous when all films in a given carriage are not of the same type and require different processing time intervals.

If desired my film processing tank 14 may be used to process films contained in a'plurality of conventional film containing reels. A straight rod provided with a stop at the lower end is passed through the center holes of a plurality of loaded reels so as to stack the reels, one

on top of another for a distance somewhat less than the I interior length of the tank 14. The rod and the stacked reels are placed in the tank 14 with the stop resting against the bottom of the tank 14, the reels resting on the stops and the upper end of the rod extending out of the tank opening. Lid is positioned on the tank 14 in light-tight engagement therewith, the rod protruding through aperture 80. By raising and lowering the rod the processing fluid in the tanks can be agitated.'This modification of the invention is particularly helpful when the number of films to be processed-is greater than the usual capacity of the already described film carriages. The rod can be provided with a sleeve thereon which mates with the lid aperture collar 82 so as to provide a light-tight seal between rod and lid.

While the preferred embodiments of the present invention have been described, it should be understood that various changes, adaptations and modifications may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A photographic film prising: a tank;

a film carriage including a sleeve insertable within the tank and a plurality of fins having an overall length at least equal to the length of the sleeve, the fins extending inward from the inner periphery of the sleeve anddividing the inside of the sleeve into a plurality of separate film compartments, the carriage further including a plurality of film supporting hooks at the upper ends of the compartments and between the fins from which film can be downwardly suspended into the separate compartments of the carriage during processing.

2. The combination according to claim 1 and including a processing equipment duct extending from the upper ends of the fins and terminating short of the lower ends of the fins.

3. The combination, according to claim 2 and includprocessing apparatus coming a handle extending between the upper ends of a pair of fins, the handle shaped to circumvent the said duct.

4. The combination according to claim 3 and including a tank lid provided with handle engaging apparatus to permit the film carriage to be rotated in the tank by rotating the lid when the lid is in place on the tank.

5. The combination according to claim 4 wherein said handle engaging apparatus of the lid has a plurality of channels in the inside of the lid extending radially from an annular channel therein to engage the carriage handle when the lid is in place on the tank.

6. The combination according to claim 2 wherein said carriage has two fins, the fins abutting against the said duct and a second like duct which terminates short of the lower end of the fins.

. the sleeve to form a annular gap therebetween to permit processing fluid to enter the compartments as the carriage is immersed in a tank of fluid.

9. The combination according to claim 1 wherein the tank has a circular cross section and the tank depth is substantially equal to the length of the carriage, and the tank has a bearing at the bottom thereof on which the carriage is rotatably supported.

10. The combination according to claim 1 and including removeable film loop weights for substantially straightening film, the loop weights suspendable from the looped end of the film and receivable within the compartments of the carriage.

11. A photographic film supporting carriage for immersion into a tank of photographic processing fluid comprising:

a circular cross section sleeve;

a plurality of fins extending inward from the inner periphery of the sleeve and dividing the inside of the sleeve into a plurality of film compartments;

a round plate affixed to the fins at a distance from the bottom of the sleeve, the outer diameterof the plate being less than the inner diameter of said sleeve to permit processing fluid to enter the sleeve when the carriage is immersed in a tank of fluid; and

a plurality of film supporting hooks at the upper ends of the fins from which films are suspended into the sleeve during processing.

12. The combination according to claim 11 wherein said plurality of fins meet adjacent the axis of said sleeve to form a duct substantially centered on the axis of the sleeve and terminating a fixed distance from the said plate permitting fluids to be directed down said duct and against said plate without forcing the carriage from the tank.

13. A photographic film processing apparatus comprising:

a tank; and a film carriage including a sleeve insertable within the tank and also including a plurality of fins extending longitudinally through the sleeve and inwardly from the inner periphery of the sleeve to divide the sleeve into a plurality of separate film compartments, the sleeve having an upper end disposed intermediate the ends of the fins, and the carriage also including a plurality of film-supporting hooks disposed between the fins and secured thereto in spaced relation with the upper end of the sleeve, said hooks suspending film into the compartments within the sleeve during film processing.

14. A photographic film supporting carriage for immersion into a tank of photographic processing fluid comprising:

hiilr fiijhii'fiii lifiihil ifie sleeve and extending inwardly from the inner periphery of the sleeve and dividing the sleeve into a plurality of film compartments;

a baffle plate affixed to the fins and transversely thereof adjacent the .bottom of the sleeve, the periphery of the baffle plate being spaced from the sleeve to permit processing fluid to enter the sleeve when the carriage is immersed in a tank of fluid; and

a plurality of film-supporting hooks at the upper ends of the fins from which films are suspended into the sleeve during processing.

' 15. A photographic film processing apparatus comprising: v

an elongate and generally tubular tank with a closed bottom and an open top;

an elongate film carriage for insertion into the tank and including an elongate duct with open upper and lower ends, a plurality of fins connected to the duct and extending outwardly therefrom into closely spaced relation with the inner periphery of the tank, and said fins having a length approximating the depth of the tank, the carriage also including a sleeve secured to and encompassing the fins and fitting in closely spaced relation within the tank for rotational and longitudinal movement, the sleeve having an upper edge disposed intermediate the upper and lower ends of the fins, said fins cooperating with each other to define separate compartments in which film may be suspended, the sleeve enclosing said compartments adjacent the lower portion of the fins,

the carriage also including a plurality of rigid filmsupporting hooks adjacent the upper ends of the fins and disposed therebetween;

means at the bottom of the carriage and tank for rotatably supporting the carriage within the tank and without obstructing said duct;

a lid on the tank to enclose the carriage therein and having means rotatable with respect to the tank to facilitate rotational agitation of the carriage with the film thereon; and

means on the lid and on the carriage and effecting releasable non-rotatable connection therebetween to produce rotational agitation of the carriage in response to coordinated manipulation of the lid.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF COECTION Patent 3 688 678 Dated September 5 1972 Merle L. Dalen It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

On the title page in the caption, delete "Assignee: Signetics Corporation, Sunnyvale, Calif."

Signed and sealed this 17th day of April 1973.

(SEAL) Attest: EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-1050 (10-69) USCOMM-DC 60376 969 U.S GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFHCE I969 O-366 f33 4 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No Dated September 5 Inventor(s) Merle L. Dalen It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent are hereby corrected as shown below:

On the title page in the caption delete "Assignee: Signetics Corporation, Sunnyvale, Calif."

Signed and sealed this 17th day of April 1973.

(SEAL) Attest:

EDWARD M.FLETCHER,JR. 1 ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents FORM PO-IOSO (10-69) uscoMM-oc 6037 6 969 I I U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE I959 0-3667334

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3839726 *Jun 20, 1973Oct 1, 1974Reichardt TTemperature-regulating cabinet for photographic processing apparatus
US4030115 *Nov 12, 1975Jun 14, 1977Anvar Agence Nationale De Valorisation De La RechercheVertical tank for developing photographic material
US4377175 *Aug 18, 1980Mar 22, 1983Fritz Stewart JApparatus for cleaning roller applicators
US4957130 *Aug 9, 1989Sep 18, 1990Lee Chien HCleaning apparatus for contact lenses
Classifications
U.S. Classification396/634, 134/162, 134/143, 396/640
International ClassificationG03D13/08, G03D3/02, G03D3/04, G03D13/02
Cooperative ClassificationG03D13/08, G03D3/04, G03D13/02
European ClassificationG03D13/08, G03D13/02, G03D3/04