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Publication numberUS3688706 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1972
Filing dateOct 27, 1970
Priority dateOct 27, 1970
Publication numberUS 3688706 A, US 3688706A, US-A-3688706, US3688706 A, US3688706A
InventorsGerald Merryweather
Original AssigneeGerald Merryweather
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination breadboard and ironing board
US 3688706 A
Abstract
A solid, rigid board is dimensioned to mount in the breadboard slot of a kitchen cabinet and to be stored therein. It has one surface plain and the opposing surface permanently covered by a resilient pad topped by a tight cover. The plain side is for use as a breadboard, and the opposing side is for use as an ironing board. Simple attached hardware modifications adapt the board for use as a portable ironing board for mounting on other cabinet arrangements.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Merryweather [451 Sept. 5, 1972 [54] COMBINATION BREADBOARD AND IRONING BOARD [72] Inventor: Gerald Merryweather, 3120 Crescent Rim Drive, Boise, Idaho 83704 [22] Filed: Oct. 27, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 84,326 A [52] US. Cl. ..108/152, 38/66, 38/111, 108/13, 108/97 [51] Int. Cl. ..A47b 5/00 [58] Field of Search ..38/66, 104, 112; 108/13, 42, 108/47, 97, 134, 135, 152; 312/233, 293

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,415,529 5/ 1922 Cronenberger 108/93 1,930,063 10/1933 Schlesinger ..38/104 X 2,324,247 7/ l 943 Ullman ..108/97 X 2,514,702 7/1950 Lantz ..108/152 3,259,082 7/1966 Williams ..108/152 Primary Examiner.lames C. Mitchell Att0meyFitch, Even, Tabin & Luedeka [57] ABSTRACT A solid, rigid board is dimensioned to mount in the breadboard slot of a kitchen cabinet and to be stored therein. It has one surface plain and the opposing surface permanently covered by a resilient pad topped by a tight cover. The plain side is for use as a breadboard, and the opposing side is for use as an ironing board. Simple attached hardware modifications adapt the board for use as a portable ironing board for mounting on other cabinet arrangements.

9 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEDSEP 51912 I 3.688.706 SHEET1BF2 l9 FIGJ m k 2.\ \l

III

INVENTOR 1W mm, a n1 COMBINATION BREADBOARD AND IRONING BOARD The present invention relates generally to horizontally supported planar surfaces and more specifically to portable ironing devices or boards having multiple uses.

The conventional household ironing board is typically constructed of a perforated, reinforced metal panel having attached thereto extendible legs and braces which, when extended and locked into position, form a support for the board. In most instances provision is made for an adjustable height of the board. The assembly is free standing on any substantially level surface. When not in use, the ironing board assembly is either collapsed and stored in an available closet, or is left in its free standing condition and rolled aside in an unused area of a utility room. To make the perforated metal panel suitable for pressing cloth thereon, a padding material cut to the shape of the board is disposed across the surface and held in position by a cover having elastic around its edges, drawing inwardly on the undersurface of the board. The purpose of the cover is to secure the pad and present a smooth surface on which to press the cloth. A difficulty is encountered, however, when ironing action on the surface overcomes the retaining force of the elastic on the cover, and a wavy, wrinkled surface results, requiring an interruption in the ironing to again smooth the surface.

Variations of the common ironing board include smaller versions of the standard board adapted for hand carrying from one point of use to another, such as from the kitchen or utility room to the dining room, the bedroom, the basement or even to a house trailer. These portable ironing boards are distinguished from the standard free standing ironing boards in that the portables usually do not have attached structure sufficient for them to be free standing, that is, completely supported by their own structure. Rather, a smaller structure may be attached to the board to adapt it for mounting on an auxiliary piece of furniture, such as a cabinet, from which a drawer is completely removed. Having mounting structure attached to the board makes it cumbersome and inconvenient to carry while traveling, and, in addition, a pad and a cover must be separately supplied. Although to be completely convenient for traveling a board would of necessity be small, it could still be useful, for there are many articles that can be easily pressed on a small board.

It is therefore a general object of the present invention to provide a small portable ironing board having no cumbersome supporting structure, but having a permanent, tight and resilient covering thereon, which for support is securely attached to a readily available cabinet utilizing a partially pulled out drawer of the cabinet.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a small portable ironing board having no cumbersome supporting structure, but having a permanent, tight and resilient covering thereon, which for support is mounted in an existing and readily available breadboard slot of a kitchen cabinet.

It is a still further object of the present invention to provide a combination ironing board and bread-board having no cumbersome supporting structure, but having on one side a permanent, tight resilient covering V and ironing board;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary perspective view of the front part of a kitchen cabinet showing the combination breadboard and ironing board mounted in the breadboard slot and the locking hardware adjacent to the breadboard slot;

FIG. 3 is an elevation detail of the lock bracket and slide used for securing the combination breadboard and ironing board;

FIG. 4 is a side detail of the lock bracket;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 2 with the combination board pulled out for use;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the portable ironing board supported between a partially pulled out cabinet drawer and the overhang of the counter top;

FIG. 7 is a detail of one end of the portable ironing board illustrating the adjustable hardware for supporting the board under the counter top;

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary perspective view of the front end of a cabinet showing the portable ironing board supported between a partially pulled out drawer and the face board of the cabinet; and

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along line 9-9 of FIG. 8 illustrating the U-shaped clip used for securing the board to the face board of the cabinet.

Referring now to FIG. 1, the combination breadboard and ironing board 11 has one squared or straight end 13 and one arcuate end 15 with two parallel sides 17 joining these two ends. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the length of the board is 22 inches, the width of the board is ll and ii inches, and the thickness of the board is one-half inch. These dimensions reflect the limitations placed on them by a kitchen cabinet and the breadboard slot of a kitchen cabinet in which the combination board is intended to be used and stored. Most kitchen cabinets are 24 inches deep; most breadboard slots are 12 inches wide and approximately three-fourths of an inch high. Normally, the slots will clear a three-fourths inch board. The preferred embodiment of the invention provides a combination board made of wood. Other materials, such as composition board, metal, or plastic, also can be used for making the board. It is important that the board be rigid and that the opposing surfaces be parallel, solid and planar. Two stops 19 are attached to the board. Both are 9 and inches long, three-fourths of an inch wide, and one-fourth of an inch thick if made of wood; one-eighth of an inch thick if made of metal. The length of the stops 19, however, is not critical. A plurality of short sections may replace a single longer length if desired. Both stops 19 are positioned near the straight end 13 of the board. Stop 19b is approximately 3 inches from end 13 of board 11' on the side used for ironing. Stop 19a is approximately one-half of an inch from end 13 of board 11 on the side used as a breadboard. A pair of flat metal inserts 21, each threefourths of an inch square and approximately one-sixteenth of an inch thick, are disposed in recesses of the panel at each of the parallel edges on surfaces opposite one another. A total of four metal inserts 21 are required for the purpose of cooperating with the stops 19 in locking the board 11 in position when it is pulled out of the slot 25 for use, as best seen in FIG. 5. In this illustration, stop 19b catches the cabinet face board 23 at the top of the breadboard slot 25. The two inserts 21 for use in conjunction with the stop 19b are located on the opposite surface from it on centers approximately I and A inches ahead of the stop 19b toward the arcuate end 15 of the board 11. In like arrangement, there is also a pair of inserts 21 to cooperate with stop 19a disposed on the opposite surface of the board from it on centers approximately 1 and #1 inches ahead of the stop 19a toward the arcuate end 15. The inserts when recessed in the wood are flush with the surface of the board. The thickness of the stops 19, on the other hand, add to the one-half inch thickness of the panel. The accumulated thickness of two one-quarter inch wood stops plus the one-half inch thickness of the panel would of itself not fit through the three-fourths inch clearance of the breadboard slot 25. The stops 19, however, are offset from directly opposing one another by 2 1% inches on centers, which gives opportunity to maneuver the board into the breadboard slot past one stop at a time. The total thickness of one stop and the board is three-fourths of an inch, which will just clear the breadboard slot 25. Since the metal inserts 21 are flush with the surface, they do not add to the thickness of the panel. I

FIG. 2 shows a front view of a typical kitchen cabinet 27 with the combination breadboard and ironing board 11 stored in the breadboard slot. At either side of the breadboard slot is the locking hardware 29 which cooperate with the metal inserts 21 on the combination board 11 for locking the board into position when it is pulled out for use.

FIG. 3 is a detail of the locking hardware 29 having lock bracket 31 and lock slide 33. The lock bracket 31 is so positioned on the face board 23 of cabinet 27 that the top edge 35 of the lock slide 33 is seven-sixteenths of an inch below the top edge 37 of the breadboard slot 25. When the combination board 11 is pulled out to use either side of the board, it must be raised slightly in order for the lock slides 33 on either side of the breadboard slot 25 to be moved toward one another, thereby cooperating with the pair of inserts 21 on the undersurface to secure the position of the combination board 1 1 for use. Inserts 21 act as bearing or wear surfaces for lock slides 33. Since the combination board 11 is onehalf of an inch thick and the top edge 35 of the lock slide 33 is seven-sixteenths of an inch below the top edge 37 of the breadboard slot 25, there will be only one-sixteenths of an inch between the top surface of the combination board and the top edge 37 of the breadboard slot 25 when the lock slides 33 are in the locked position. It is this maneuver that causes the stop 19b on the combination board 11 to engage the inside surface of the cabinet 27 face board 23 at the breadboard slot 25 when the combination board 11 is pulled out. This particular description assumes an arbitrary selection of the ironing surface exposed for use as illustrated in FIG. 5. The board is secured in like manner when the opposite surface is selected for use as a breadboard. The lock bracket 31 has notches 39 on either side of it into which the thickness of either operating tab 41 at the ends of lock slide 33 fit when lock slide 33 is positioned either in the full open or full locked condition. When left side locking hardware 29a is in full open position, tab 41b will engage in notch 39b of FIG. 3; whereas when locking hardware 29a is in full locked position, tab 41a will engage in notch 390. Just the op posite occurs for the corresponding conditions of right side locking hardware 29b. This feature of locking the combination board to secure its position for use as an ironing board has a further advantage of providing an improvement over conventional breadboards when used as a breadboard. The secured position eliminates the wobble and the possibility of the breadboard slipping out of the slot and falling on the floor.

The preferred embodiment has, as seen in FIG. 1, material disposed across one planar surface of the combination board 11 for the purpose of providing a good ironing surface for a conventional hand ironing instrument, such as a" steam iron. A three-sixteenths inch thick pad 43, such as urethane, is applied to the solid surface 45 of the board. Stretched tightly across the pad 43 is a plain-woven fabric material 47, such as muslin, acting'as a cover for the pad. It is important that the muslin be stretched tightly across the pad, for a tight surface is better for ironing than a loose, wrinkled surface. The cover is affixed to the two sides and the arcuate end edges of the board by a suitable cement to maintain its tightness. This provides the added advantage of having appropriate padding always on the board, eliminating the need for separately handling a pad and a cover. A one-half inch trim tape is then affixed around the edges by a suitable cement as a finish to the combination board 11. The cover, pad, and tape can be removed for replacement when necessary by pulling them off at the cemented edges. The pad and cover extend toward the straight end 13 of the board 11 as far as the stop 19b. The opposing surface of the board remains plain for use as a breadboard.

The preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes a urethane foam pad on a board having a solid surface. Such a pad is resilient. It readily compresses upon application of a pressure and yet returns to its original configuration upon relief of the pressure. Further, such a pad is permeable to steam and yet is nonabsorbing as to moisture. The steam readily penetrates the pad 43 which remains firm and dry, strikes the surface 45, and is reflected from the solid surface back to the underside of the cloth being ironed. This creates an improved ironing action over the style of board which permits steam to be dissipated through a perforated surface.

The illustrated combination board 11 is easily removed from the breadboard slot 25 by maneuvering it beyond both stops 19, one at a time. It can be turned end for end or surface for surface as desired. In addition, it can be easily taken out for use on a kitchen cabinet surface or other convenient surface. When used in the breadboard slot as an ironing board the arcuate edge 15 extends outwardly from the cabinet. Clothing articles, such as blouses, dresses and jackets, can be slipped over the arcuate end 15 of the board 11 without interference. When the board is locked in position, it is secure and self-supporting. There is no need for legs or braces on the underside of the board. Because of this, the space under the board is free, clear, and accessible.

This combination board is small enough to be a good traveling companion, along with a travel iron, for use while away from home. It fits in a suitcase. In addition, this combination board is especially adapted for use in trailers, mobile homes, campers, motels, apartments, and hotels. A slight modification of the combination board makes it useful as an ironing board while supported on a separate surface, such as a counter top or table. By attaching three small pads, such as rubber pads, to the surface opposite the ironing surface, two of the pads forming the base of a triangle near the corners of the straight end 13 and one pad forming the apex of the triangle near the arcuate end 15 the ironing board will not slip when it is placed on another surface for ironing. When the combination board is used as a traveling companion, an appropriate hanging means can be attached at the center of straight edge 13 for hanging the board on an available hook. The hanging means can be omitted or removed if it becomes a hindrance. When the combination board is stored in the kitchen cabinet 27 breadboard slot 25, it will normally be placed with the straight end 13 facing out so as to be flush with the front of the cabinet. This position, illustrated in FIG. 2, provides a neat, finished appearance.

A variation of the combination breadboard and ironing board is a portable ironing board only. It has the same resilient pad and covering stretched tightly across its surface, as illustrated in FIG. 1, but only a single stop 19b and a pair of metal inserts 21 associated therewith on the opposing surface are required. This board is longer than the combination board and cannot be stored in the kitchen cabinet. Use of this portable ironing board in the breadboard slot 25 requires the conventional breadboard to first be removed from the cabinet. Then the ironing board is locked into position for use. The same locking hardware 29 is used for this purpose. The suggested length of such a portable ironing board is 32 inches, 10 inches longer than the combination board. This longer board is still small enough to be easily carried while traveling. If three small pads are applied to the undersurface of the board, as earlier explained, it can also be used on cabinet surfaces without sliding. When the board is used in the breadboard slot of a kitchen cabinet and locked in position, it too is fully supported so that there is no need for legs or braces underneath the board, leaving that space completely free, clear, and accessible.

A second variation of the combination breadboard and ironing board is also a portable ironing board only. This board 48, as illustrated in FIG. 6, has the same physical characteristics as the first thirty-two inch portable ironing board variation, except that the mounting hardware constitutes a single stop 19 and two adjustable studs 49 having flat heads 50 as illustrated in FIG. 6. The adjustable stud detail is illustrated in FIG. 7. This board utilizes a partially pulled out drawer 51 in a piece of furniture or cabinet 57 as its principle support, rather than a breadboard slot of a kitchen cabinet. This feature adds more possibilities to the places where the ironing board may be used. Many cabinets and furniture having drawers, have overhanging top surfaces or counters 53. Since there may be variances between the underneath portion of the overhanging surface and the top edges of the top drawer, distance D in FIG. 6, the adjustable studs 49, which can also be threaded rods or bolts, are used to compensate for these variances in D and level the ironing board 48. The adjustable studs are locked into position by nuts 55 which are tightened against both the upper and the lower surfaces of the ironing board 48. This tightening does not require the use of tools, but can be accomplished with only the fingers. Thus, when moving the board from one supporting structure to another, any differences in D of the supporting structures can be quickly compensated for by a finger adjustment of the threaded studs. This easy adjustment feature is important, since it is desirable to use this board while traveling, as well as at home, and tools are not always accessible. Use of this board simply requires the partially pulling out of a top drawer 51 if a supporting structure 57, such as a kitchen cabinet, a bathroom cabinet, or a piece of furniture, and placing the ironing board between the partially pulled out drawer and the overhang of the top pieces 53 of the cabinet 57. The drawer 51 then is pushed toward a'closed position until it encounters the stop 19 on the bottom side of the ironing board 48. This then secures the position of the ironing board for use. Again, the board is wholly supported and has freedom underneath, having no legs or supporting braces thereunder. The material of the board and the resilient cover disposed thereacross plus the advantages for them are identical with those described earlier for the same items.

Where there are no overhanging top surfaces on the supporting cabinets available, a third variation of the combination breadboard and ironing board is utilized and is illustrated in FIG. 8. This is also an ironing board only and is similar to the second variation just described. It utilizes a partially pulled out drawer 51 of a cabinet 57, but in place of the two adjustable threaded rods 49 (FIG. 6) at the straight end 13 of the board 48 are two U-shaped clips 59. These clips are attached to the board and engage the face board 23 of the cabinet 57, thereby securing the ironing board 48 as it rests on the partially pulled out drawer 51. A detail of the U-shaped clip 59 is shown in FIG. 9. This variation of the board 48, in addition to having a secure means of attaching it to the supporting structure 57, has the added advantage of being useful in a drawer other than the top drawer immediately under an overhanging counter top. For example, if the user of the board wishes to sit and have the board positioned lower than that desired when standing, a lower drawer could be used. Or, if the user wishes to utilize a bank of builtin drawers having no overhanging counter top but having drawer fronts substantially flush with the wall, this ironing board variation can be used.

Although the specific embodiment has been described having certain dimensions, the two portable ironing boards described having mounting hardware for use on partially pulled out drawers, need not have special limitations as to dimensions of width, length or thickness. These dimensions need only be reasonable for the anticipated use. While the invention is susceptible to various modifications and alternative constructions, only the preferred embodiment has been shown in the drawings and described in detail. Such disclosure is not intended to limit the invention. The aim is to cover all modifications and alternative constructions falling within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the appended claims.

7 Various of the features of the invention are set forth in the following claims. What is claimed is:

l. A portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth by a portable ironing instrument, said portable device supportable on an independent structure, comprising in combination: a rigid board made of material selected from the group consisting of wood, composition board, plastic, and metal; a first solid, planar, and generally rectangular surface on said rigid board; a second solid, planar, and generally rectangular surface on said rigid board opposing and parallel with said first surface; a pair of side edges, parallel to and spaced apart from each other, along the length of and joining said first and second surfaces; a first end having an edge along the width of and joining said first and second surfaces, said first end defining a straight line intersecting said pair of side edges at right angles; a second end'having an edge along the width of and joining said first and second surfaces, said edge of second end defining an arcuate shape merging with said side edges; a resilient, steam permeable, nonabsorbing pad disposed on said first surface, whereby when said portable ironing instrument is a steam iron, steam from said iron can freely penetrate to and be reflected from said solid surface and be distributed through said pad to the undersurfaces of cloth being ironed; a cover of plainwoven fabric stretched tightly across said pad and affixed to both said side edges and said second end to effect a permanent, smooth ironing surface thereon; and means for removably attaching said portable device to said independent structure for support, said attaching means disposed near said first end, thereby providing open working space under said portable device when attached for use. i

2. The portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth as recited in claim 1, supportable on an independent structure having an overhanging top and at least one drawer immediately thereunder, wherein said attaching means comprises: a stop on said second surface spaced from said first end; and an adjustable flat-headed stud adjacent said first end, so that when said portable device is supported between said drawer partially pulled out and said overhanging top, said adjustable flat-headed stud acts against said overhanging top to support at one point and to level said portable device, and said stop acts against the inside of said drawer to gauge the position of said drawer, whereby said portable device is wholly supported on said independent structure free of legs thereunder.

3. The portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth as recited in claim 1, supportable on an independent structure having a face board and a slidable drawer supported in an opening through said face board, wherein said attaching means comprises: a stop on said second surface spaced from said first end; and a U-shaped clip attached to said first end, so that when said portable device is supported between said drawer partially pulled out and said face board at the top of said opening, said U-shaped clip engages said face board at the top of said opening, and said stop acts against the inside of said drawer to gauge the position of said drawer, whereby said portable device is wholly supported-on said independent structure free of legs thereunder.

4. A portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth by a portable ironing instrument, said portable device being supportable on an independent structure having a face board with a breadboard slot therethrough, comprising in combination: a rigid board made of material selected from the group consisting of wood, composition board, plastic and metal; a first solid, planar, and generally rectangular surface on said rigid board; a second solid, planar, and generally rectangular surface on said rigid board opposing and parallel to said first surface; a pair of side edges, parallel to and spaced apart from each other, along the length of and joining said first and second surfaces; a first end having an edge along the width of and joining said first and second surfaces, said first end defining a straight line intersecting said pair of side edges at right angles; a second end having an edge along the width of and joining said first and second surfaces, said edge of second end defining an arcuate shape merging with said side edges; a resilient, steam permeable, nonabsorbing pad disposed on said first surface; a cover of plainwoven fabric stretched tightly across said pad and affixed to both said side edges and said second end to effect a permanent, smooth ironing surface thereon; and means for removably attaching said portable device to said independent structure for support, said attaching means on said device being disposed near said first end, said attaching means comprising a bracket and metal slide combination locking device attached to said face board adjacent either end of said breadboard slot; a stop spaced from said first end on said first surface to act against the inside of said face board to limit movement of said portable device in said breadboard slot when said portable device is urged upwardly by said locking slides when said portable device is locked in position for ironing thereon; and a flat metal insert, in the form of a thin squarehaving one flat exposed surface, recessed in and flush with said second surface adjacent either edge thereof and spacedfrom said first end to cooperate with said metal slides adjacent said breadboard slot as a bearing surface for locking said portable device in position for use as an ironing board, whereby said portable device is wholly supportable on said independent structure free of legs thereunder.

5. The portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth as recited in claim 4, wherein said rigid board is 32 inches longitudinally of its greatest part, 1 l and b inches wide, and one-half inch thick, and said stop is one-quarter inch thick if wood and one-eighth inch thick if metal, whereby said portable device is mountable within said breadboard slot.

6. The portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth as recited in claim 4 and on which, in

combination, to implement separately the kneading and rolling of dough and the cutting and chopping of food, said combination portable device supportable on an independent structure having a face board with a breadboard slot therethrough, further comprisingza stop on said second surface spaced from said first end and offset toward said first end from said stop on said first surface, so that both said stops are not in positions directly opposing one another, said stop on said second surface to act against the inside of said face board to limit movement in said breadboard slot of said com bination portable device when said device is urged upwardly by said locking slides to lock said Combination portable device in position for breadboard use; and a flat metal insert, in the form of a thin square having one flat exposed surface, recessed in and flush with said first surface adjacent either edge thereof, spaced from said first end and offset toward said first end from said inserts on said second surface, said inserts on said first surface to cooperate with said metal slides adjacent said breadboard slot as a bearing surface for locking said combination portable device in position for use as a breadboard, whereby said combination portable device is wholly supported on said independent structure free of legs thereunder.

7. The combination portable device as recited in claim 6, wherein said rigid board is 22 inches longitudinally of its greatest part, 11 and k inches wide,.and one-half inch thick, and said stop is one-quarter inch thick if wood and one-eighth inch thick if metal, whereby said combination portable device is mountable within said breadboard slot and is storable in said breadboard slot and within said independent supporting structure.

8. The portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth as recited in claim 4, wherein said resilient, steam permeable, nonabsorbing pad is of urethane foam material.

9. The portable device on which to implement the ironing of cloth as recited in claim 4, wherein said plain-woven fabric cover is muslin.

i I I I t

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1415529 *Jul 15, 1919May 9, 1922Hobart G MillerCombined kitchen table and ironing board
US1930063 *Jan 18, 1932Oct 10, 1933Alfred F YoergReversible pressing board and stand therefor
US2324247 *Apr 27, 1942Jul 13, 1943Henry K UllmanPortable table
US2514702 *Mar 8, 1944Jul 11, 1950Perry Lantz AlphaPortable ironing board
US3259082 *Apr 23, 1965Jul 5, 1966Carol N WilliamsPortable shelf
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4706574 *Oct 22, 1986Nov 17, 1987Mason Robert LLocking removable support surface and adapter
US4799321 *Jan 16, 1987Jan 24, 1989Johnson Leo DIroning board
US5121909 *Nov 8, 1990Jun 16, 1992Teledyne Industries, Inc.Barbecue tray
US7555856Dec 30, 2005Jul 7, 2009Whirlpool CorporationIroning station
US8033037Jul 6, 2009Oct 11, 2011Whirlpool CorporationIroning station
US8033038Jul 6, 2009Oct 11, 2011Whirlpool CorporationIroning station
Classifications
U.S. Classification108/152, 38/111, 38/66, 108/97, 108/13
International ClassificationA47B5/00, A47J47/00, A47B77/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47J47/005, A47B2220/0038, A47B77/10, A47B5/00
European ClassificationA47B77/10, A47J47/00A, A47B5/00