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Publication numberUS3689051 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1972
Filing dateNov 23, 1970
Priority dateNov 23, 1970
Publication numberUS 3689051 A, US 3689051A, US-A-3689051, US3689051 A, US3689051A
InventorsMiller Alfred W
Original AssigneeMiller Alfred W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liner and divider structure for slag pots or the like
US 3689051 A
Abstract
An expendable, pre-molded, heat-resistant liner and divider assembly for use with a slag pot or the like adapted to receive molten materials for facilitating the removal and recovery of said materials from the pot after solidification of said materials and the manipulation and transportation of the latter when free of the pot. The liner employs a one-piece cup-like unit adapted to be inserted into the pot and to complementally engage the inner surface of the pot. The divider may employ a one-piece unit having a plurality of intersecting partition elements having outer surfaces complementally engaging the inner surface of the liner or of the pot when no liner is used or a multiple piece unit having a plurality of partition elements which may be coupled together during installation to present a similar divider configuration.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Miller 1 Sept. 5, 1972 LINER AND DIVIDER STRUCTURE FOR SLAG POTS OR THE LIKE [72] Inventor: Alfred W. Miller, 509 Donnelly,

Kansas City, Mo. 64125 [22] Filed: Nov. 23, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 91,944

[52] US. Cl ..266/39, 220/22, 220/63 R, 249/112, 249/130, 249/131, 249/132 [51] Int. Cl. ..B28b 7/08 [58] Field of Search .....220/22; 266/39, 40; 249/112, 249/129, 130, 131, 132; 164/33 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,217,093 10/1940 Amidon ..266/37 1,861,946 6/1932 Wilhelmi ..266/39 1,480,897 l/l924 DeMotte ..220/22 UX 2,048,412 7/1936 Sissman ..249/ 130 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 240,761 4/1946 Switzerland ..220/22 Primary ExaminerJ. Spencer Overholser Assistant Examiner-John E. Roethel A'ttomeySchmidt, Johnson, Hovey & Williams [57] ABSTRACT An expendable, pre-molded, heat-resistant liner and divider assembly for use with a slag pot or the like adapted to receive molten materials for facilitating the removal and recovery of said materials from the pot after solidification of said materials and the manipulation and transportation of the latter when free of the pot. The liner employs a one-piece cup-like unit adapted to be inserted into the pot and to complementally engage the inner surface of the pot. The divider may employ a one-piece unit having a plurality of intersecting partition elements having outer surfaces complementally engaging the inner surface of the liner or of the pot when no liner is used or a multiple piece unit having a plurality of partition elements which may be coupled together during installation to present a similar divider configuration.

4 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEnsEP' 51912 3,689,051

' HI r0 NfYS.

LINER AND DIVIDER STRUCTURE FOR SLAG POTS OR THE LIKE This invention relates to the field of slag pots or similar metallurgical receptacles and, more particularly, to expendable liner and divider means for insertion within the pot to facilitate the removal and recovery of the metal material from the pot.

It has long been a serious problem in the steel industry and other related metallurgical industries that the pots and receptacles which are used to transport the molten steel or other metal, have a tendency to retain a certain amount of the material on their internal surfaces. The retention of the material, especially after a number of uses, may significantly reduce the effective capacity of the pot due to the buildup of successive layers of material within the pot. The problem is even more acute with regard to slag pots, where the entire amount of the metal material placed in the pot in molten condition is normally held therein until it has solidified, whereupon it is often extremely difficult to remove the solidified material from the pot.

The method commonly used to attempt to remove solidified material is the physical striking or dropping of the pot in an effort to break the bond between the material and the interior surfaces of the pot, so that the material may then be dumped or otherwise removed therefrom. Such striking or dropping of the pot often results in breakage or extensive damage to the pot, thus requiring expensive repairs or, in some cases, complete replacement of the pot at substantial expense. A second drawback to the use of such physical force for removing the material is that this method, even when it does not result in damage to the pot, frequently fails to completely remove all of the material.

A secondary problem facing the steel and other related industries is the problem of transporting and handling the mass of slag or other metal material once it has solidified and been removed from the pot. As may be appreciated, a mass of metal material corresponding to the volume and dimensions of the interior of the typical pot, which often is as much as 9 feet high and 9 feet in diameter, is extremely large and heavy and very difficult to handle. Heretofore, it has been necessary that the entire mass of material be cut up into a plurality of smaller chunks of a size which may be more conveniently handled and transported, which is extremely time consuming and expensive.

Accordingly, it is the primary object of this invention to provide an expendable liner for insertion within and use with a slag pot or the like in order to facilitate the removal of solidified slag or other metal material from the pot and to substantially eliminate the need to physically strike or jar the pot.

Another important object is to provide such a liner which is expendable and may be economically fabricated from a dry, heat-resistant material having a melting point temperature higher than that of the metal material to be handled.

Still another important object of this invention is to provide a divider for insertion within the liner, or within a pot if no liner is used, which will greatly facilitate the manipulation and transportation of the metal material after solidification and removal of the material from the pot by substantially reducing the A further important object is to provide such a divider which is expendable and may be economically fabricated from a dry, heat-resistant material having a melting point temperature higher than that of the metal material to be handled.

Still other important objects of the invention will be apparent or be made clear from the accompanying drawing and the description of the illustrative embodiments of the invention that follows.

In the drawing:

FIG 1 is an exploded view showing the operative relationship of a liner and one embodiment of a divider of the present invention with a conventional slag pot;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the slag pot, divider, and liner of FIG. 1, with the pot and liner shown in vertical cross section and the divider shown in side elevation;

FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the liner, divider and slag pot of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 4 is a side elevational view of a second embodiment of the divider of the present invention shown in its unassembled state.

A liner and divider assembly of the present invention utilizing the first embodiment of the divider is generally designated in the drawing by the numeral 10 and broadly includes a liner 12 and a one-piece divider 14. The liner 12 has a side wall 13 and a bottom wall 15 and is configured to be received within a conventional slag pot 16 with the external side surface 18 and bottom surface 19 of the liner 12 being complementally received and supported by a normally tapered internal side surface 20 and a bottom surface 21 respectively of the pot 16, the liner 12 providing complete separation between the inner surface 20 of the pot l6 and the inner surface 22 of the liner 12, thereby effectively isolating the molten material (not shown) to be introduced into liner 12 from the interior surface 20 of the pot 16.

The liner 12 is provided with an out-turned annular flange portion 17 adapted to overlie the top edge of the pot 16 when the liner is in place, so as to prevent molten material being poured from entering between the liner 12 and the internal surface 20 of pot 16. The liner 12 is preferably premolded in the above configuration from a dry, heat-resistant material having a melting point temperature higher than that of the slag in order to present a one-piece, expendable liner. One suitable material satisfying these requirements, and which is currently the preferred material for forming assemblies 10, is disclosed in U. S. Letter Pat. No. 3,373,047, issued to Sheets and Lennon on Mar. 12, 1968, and comprising a mixture of granular refractory material, inorganic fibrous asbestos, and bonder. The liner 12 is preferably made relatively thin, an inch or less being typical, and the minimization of such thickness of the walls of liner 12 is dependent upon the physical strength during handling and emplacement and the amount of burning if any during pouring characterizing the particular material chosen to form the liner 12.

The divider 14 is also preferably pre-molded from a material such as described for the liner l2, and comprises a plurality of intersecting partition elements 24 intersecting generally along the vertical center axis of the liner 14. Each of the partition elements 24 have a pair of opposed, outwardly facing, upwardly extending side surfaces 26 which are complementally received and engaged by the interior surface 22 of the liner 12 (or the interior surface 20 of the pot 16 if no liner 12 is employed). Each partition element 24 also has a horizontal bottom surface 27 which engages a corresponding interior bottom surface 20 of liner 12 (or pot 16). The partition elements 24 separate the interior of the liner 12 into a plurality of zones 28 of generally equal volumetric capacity which divide and separate the mass of slag which is ultimately poured into the pot into a corresponding plurality of separate, generally equal, smaller units. As may be appreciated, these smaller units, when they have solidified are capable of being handled with a greater amount of case than that required for a piece corresponding to the original volume of slag held by a slag pot of customary size.

The side surfaces 26 of divider 14 are preferably provided with a plurality of spaced notches 30, in order to provide a series of limited passageways communicating each zone with its respective adjacent zones, for maintaining a uniform level of molten metal material in all of the zones 28 and eliminating any excessive stress on any one partition wall resulting from an uneven accumulation of material within a corresponding zone 28. If notches 30 were not provided, and if the molten material were allowed to accumulate in one zone, the greater weight inherent from the larger accumulation of material might tend to force the partition element 24 in the direction toward its adjacent zone 28 resulting in a fractured or collapsed partition element 24. On the other hand, the size of notches 30 must be kept relatively small in comparison with the overall size of the partition 24 in order to reduce or retain at a minimum the size of the material which will ultimately interconnect zones 28 through the notches 30 and which will, when the material has cooled, to some extent bond the original mass of material together until such time as the material is cut or broken apart. As may be appreciated, an unnecessarily large notch 30 would lessen the effectiveness of divider 14 by forming a bond of larger size requiring more effort to sever than for a smaller bond. It may also be observed that in lieu of notches 30, a plurality of openings could have been provided through the main portion of the partition elements 24 in order to provide a similar method of leveling the material within the liner 12; however, the solidified material extending through such openings could not be cut or broken as easily as the material resulting from the use of notches 30 through the side surfaces 26.

Each divider 14 is provided with a top edge 34 preferably sloping downwardly toward the common axis of intersection 32. Top edge 34 is sloped in the manner described in order to facilitate division of material between the zones 28 and to reduce the tendency of the material to splash out of the confines of the pot 16 during the introduction of the molten material therein.

A second illustrative embodiment of the divider assembly of the present invention is shown in FIG. 4 and is generally designated by the numeral 114. Divider 114 is also preferably used in conjunction with a liner l2, and comprise a plurality of individual partition elements 124 similar in configuration to the divider partitions 24, but the elements 124 are provided with a vertical central slot 129 extending upwardly through a horizontal bottom surface 127 of one element 124, and

extending downwardly through top edge 134 of a second partition element 124. Divider 1 14 is assembled by inserting the one partition element 124 over and downwardly onto the other element 124 at their respective slots 129 in order to present a configuration of intersecting elements 124 similar to that of divider 14 of the first embodiment. Such construction of divider 114 facilitates shipment and handling, since the elements 124 may be stacked when not assembled.

Partition elements 124 are also provided with notches 130 vertically along the side surfaces 126 similar to notches 30 of the first embodiment and a top edge 134 similar to surface 34 of the first embodiment and for the same reasons.

In use, the liner 12 is emplaced within the interior of slag pot 16 and divider 14, if it is to be employed, is then emplaced within the interior of liner 12, both operations being accomplished prior to the introduction of the material into slag pot 16. The procedure for the liner 12 and divider assembly 114 of the second embodiment is similar to the aforementioned procedure with the exception that before the insertion of divider 1 14, the latter must be assembled in the manner previously described, with one element 124 being fitted onto the other element 124. With the liner l2 and divider assembly 14 or 114 being in position within slag pot 16, the slag material is then introduced into the pot. When it is desired t remove the material from pot 16, the pot 16 may be inverted by any suitable method thereby allowing the solidified material, liner 12 and divider 14 or 114 to fall free and clear from slag pot 16. A new liner l2 and divider 14 or 114 may then be inserted into the pot 16 in preparation for the next batch of material.

With the bulk of the solidified material now resting on the ground and free from pot 16, the smallamount of material extending through slots 30 or 130, which is disposed in a freely accessible position around the external surface of the solidified material, may be severed by a torch or the like in order to cause the slag material to break away from the divider 14 or 114 and to be separated into a plurality of separate pieces corresponding to the number of zones 28 defined within the interior of the pot by the divider partitions 14 or 114. These smaller individual pieces may then be conveniently removed and used or disposed of in whatever manner is desired.

Therefore, it may be appreciated that the present invention accomplishes all of its objects by providing an expendable, heat resistant liner which may be easily removed from the pot without striking or jarring and which eliminates the problem of the metal material adhering to the walls of the pot, and by providing an expendable divider which substantially reduces the amount of cutting or the like necessary to separate the metal material into a plurality of smaller pieces that can be more conveniently handled. It should also be appreciated by those skilled in the art that a number of minor modifications and changes of details of construction might be made without departing from the principles and true spirit of the invention. Accordingly, it should be understood that the invention is to be deemed limited only by the fair scope of the claims that follow.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. In apparatus for handling metal slag material wherein an imperforate, metallic slag pot is provided for carrying said material, the improvement of which comprises the combination with said slag pot of a liner device adapted to fit into said slag pot for receiving said material while molten and facilitate the latter removal and recovery of said material from said pot without damage to said pot after solidification of said material, said device comprising:

an expendable, unitary assembly adapted to be inserted and freely received in said pot prior to introduction of said molten material for receiving and holding said material within said pot,

said assembly being dry, heat-resistant, substantially rigid and molded from a nonmetallic substance having a melting point temperature greater than said metal material,

said assembly being of cup-like configuration to isolate the outer surface of said material from the interior surface of said pot,

said assembly being proved with exterior surfaces configured and adapted for complementally engaging the interior surface of said pot throughout substantially the entire area of the latter to support the assembly during introduction of molten material into said pot;

said assembly and said material therein falling as a unit free and clear of the pot when the latter is placed in an inverted position after solidification of the material in said assembly.

10 jacent zones, said divider structure including a plurality of vertically disposed intersecting partition elements, each of said elements having a pair of opposed, outwardly facing, upwardly extending surfaces for complementally engaging the inner surface of said assembly to support the structure during introduction of molten material into said assembly.

3. The invention of claim 2, wherein said divider structure has an element provided with a slot extending upwardly from its bottom and an element provided with a slot extending downwardly from its top, said slotted elements being fitted together with a portion of each recessed within the slot of the other.

4. The invention of claim 2, wherein said elements are provided with opening means therethrough interconnecting a minor portion of each zone with a minor portion of its respective adjacent zones, said opening means comprising a plurality of notches spaced along the length of said opposed surfaces.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1480897 *May 15, 1920Jan 15, 1924Motte Frank B DeCan
US1861946 *Jun 25, 1931Jun 7, 1932Alfred WilhelmiCarrier for slag pans and the like
US2048412 *Mar 21, 1930Jul 21, 1936Copeman Lab CoTray for refrigerators
US2217093 *Feb 29, 1940Oct 8, 1940Amidon Hugh CSkull separator
CH240761A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3854905 *Apr 24, 1972Dec 17, 1974Rca CorpStorage system for two phase fluids
US4131265 *Oct 12, 1977Dec 26, 1978Mccray Walter ASlag pots
US4294438 *Jul 30, 1980Oct 13, 1981The Stackpole CorporationReplaceable liner for a crucible
US4330107 *Nov 7, 1980May 18, 1982Foseco Trading A.G.Teapot ladle and method of use
US4367866 *Apr 10, 1981Jan 11, 1983Sunbeam Equipment CorporationFurnace adapted to contain molten metal
US4422625 *Feb 23, 1982Dec 27, 1983Fmc CorporationFoundry pouring ladle protective liner
US4483119 *Jun 23, 1983Nov 20, 1984Ernest HernandezBar support for use with reinforced concrete
US4768674 *Jul 7, 1987Sep 6, 1988Sip Development CorporationFor placement within an internal chamber of a vessel
US4938675 *Dec 12, 1988Jul 3, 1990Contreras Joseph AApparatus for making multi-sectioned and multi-colored solid products having a desired geometric or other shape
US5039345 *Feb 27, 1990Aug 13, 1991Advanced Metals Technology Corp.Fiber composite article and method of manufacture
US5412907 *Sep 19, 1994May 9, 1995Anderson; George C.Deep, free-standing, convertibly subdivided, plant container assembly
US5452881 *Nov 5, 1993Sep 26, 1995Horiba Ltd.Crucible for an analyzer
US5833052 *Aug 7, 1997Nov 10, 1998Diamond; Patricia MaryJewelry chain holding device
US5880404 *Jun 26, 1997Mar 9, 1999Advanced Metals Technology CorporationPower transmission support structures
US6213335 *Oct 25, 1999Apr 10, 2001Patrick Thomas WilsonStackable container with internal divider
US20110118681 *Nov 5, 2010May 19, 2011Medlndica-Pak, Inc.Supply chain method and apparatus for sealing and unsealing a vacuum draw path
US20110118682 *Nov 12, 2010May 19, 2011Jack Woodward RomanoSupply chain method and apparatus for sealing and unsealing a vacuum draw path
DE10127671B4 *Jun 5, 2001Jun 4, 2009Aktiengesellschaft der Dillinger HüttenwerkeSchlackenkübel
Classifications
U.S. Classification266/275, 249/112, 220/529, 266/280, 220/23.87, 249/131, 249/132, 220/552, 249/130
International ClassificationC21B3/10, B22D41/02, C21B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationC21B3/10, B22D41/02
European ClassificationB22D41/02, C21B3/10