Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3689204 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1972
Filing dateMay 18, 1970
Priority dateMay 18, 1970
Publication numberUS 3689204 A, US 3689204A, US-A-3689204, US3689204 A, US3689204A
InventorsPrisk Bert C
Original AssigneeGen Motors Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Laminated liquid pump and method of making same
US 3689204 A
Abstract
A liquid pump is formed by superposing several sheets of thin flexible material which may be fused together, for example, polyvinyl chloride. The flexible sheets form a displacement chamber, an air pressure operated pumping chamber inlet and outlet passages and check valve flaps in the passages. The valve flaps are formed from the flexible sheets by slitting in appropriate places or are provided by separate flexible sheets. The several sheets are laminated by applying heat and pressure in a predetermined pattern to provide the essential pump elements. The pumping air chamber may be omitted.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States atent Prisk Sept. 5, 1972 [54] LAMINATED LIQUID PUMP AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME [72] Inventor: Bert C. Prisk, Grosse Pointe Woods,

Mich.

[73] Assignee: General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich.

22 Filed: May 18,1970

21 Appl.No.: 38,353

52 U.S.Cl ..417/394,417/479 [51] 7 Int. Cl ..F04b 43/10,'F04b 45/00, F04b 43/00 [58] Field of Search ..4l7/394, 478, 479, 480

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Rippingille ..417/3'94 x Mirardo ..417/479 3,579,644 5/1971 Esmond ..4l7/394X Primary Examiner-Robert M. Walker Attorney-Jean L. Carpenter, Paul Fitzpatrick and Warren D. Hill 57 ABSTRACT A liquid pump is formed by superposing several sheets of thin flexible material which may be fused together, for example, polyvinyl chloride. The flexible sheets form a displacement chamber, an air pressure operated pumping chamber inlet and outlet passages and check valve flaps in the passages; The valve flaps are formed from the flexible sheets by slitting in appropriate places or are provided by separate flexible sheets. The several sheets are-laminated by applying heat and pressure in a predetermined pattern to provide the essential pump elements. The pumping air chamber may be omitted.

2 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures PU LSATING AIR SOURCE memos-Ev 's 1972 SHEET 1 0F 2 PU LSATING AIR SOURCE BLOOD FLOW INVENTOR. BY awazm ATTORNEY PATEN'IED EP 5m? 3.689.204

SHEET 30F 2 I [.XVEJYTUR PULSATNG 152% 01. 1%

POWER BY sUFPLY a /mw 4%M ATTORNEY 1 LATED LIQUID PUMP AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME This invention relates to a liquid pump and a method of making the same. More specifically, the invention relates to a blood pump suitable for use during open heart surgery or for use in implantable hearts in animals or humans and a method of making such a pump from sheet material.

It has previously been proposed to provide extracorporeal blood pumps for use during heart surgery to bypass the heart and give the surgeons a dry field free of blood so that they can see what they are doing. The presently available pumps of this type are expensive, require an inordinate amount of service before, during and after the operation and tend to cause serious damage to the blood. In addition, intrathoracic blood pumps have been proposed to be used as artificial hearts. However, these designs have been extremely complex and also have a record of damaging blood. It is now recognized that the design of a blood pump should include the following features: (1) the pumping action should simulate the natural hearts action and be hemodynamically accurate, (2) the valve action should allow for free flow and low turbulence in the open position and should be hydraulically active to match the pumping action of the chambers, (3) the construction materials should be sterile and non-thrombogenic, (4) the fabrication should be simple and of reasonable cost.

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide a simple inexpensive hemodynamically accurate blood pump.

Another object of this invention is to provide a liquid pump formed of laminated flat flexible sheets.

A further object is to provide a method of making a liquid pump by laminating several flexible sheets.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a method of making a liquid pump by slitting the walls of an existing passage formed of flexible sheets and laminating thereto additional flexible sheets.

The invention is carried out by securing together thin sheets of a fusible flexible material to form a displacement chamber, inlet and outlet passages and check valves in the passages. The invention further contemplates forming an air pumping chamber within or adjacent the displacement chamber.

More specifically, the invention is carried out by laminating several layers of thin flexible sheet material to define a displacement chamber and air pumping chamber and inlet and outlet passages and providing slits in certain of the flexible sheets to provide cooperating flaps to form a check valve in each passage.

The invention is also carried out by providing a liquid pump having walls and valves formed of thin flexible sheet-like material defining displacement, inlet and outlet passages and check valves in each passage. The invention further contemplates one or more air pumping chambers adjacent or within the displacement chamber also formed of thin flexible sheet material.

The above and other advantages will be made more apparent from the following specification taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a liquid pump according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is an elevational cross-section view of the pump of FIG. 1 taken along lines 2-2 thereof and illustrating an intermediate step in the formation of the blood pump;

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of the pump of FIG. 1 taken along lines 2-2 illustrating the pump in its filling mode;

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the pump of FIG. 1 taken along lines 2-2 illustrating the pump in its pumping mode;

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of a second embodiment of a liquid pump;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional elevational view of the pump of FIG. 5 taken along lines 6-6;

FIG. 7 is a cross-sectional view of the pump of FIG. 6

I taken along the lines 77;

FIG. 8 is a plan view of a third embodiment of a liquid pump according to the invention;

FIG. 9 is an exploded cross-secu'onal side view of the pump of FIG. 8 taken along lines 9-9 thereof illustrating an intermediate step in the process of making it; and,

FIG. 10 is a schematic view of the blood pump of FIG. 8 and an apparatus for operating the pump.

The fabrication of the preferred embodiment is best explained with reference to FIGS. 1 and 2. The pump is formed entirely of thin sheets of non-thrombogenic flexible material such as a medical grade of polyvinyl chloride. Two sheets 10 of this material, preferable 0.008 inch thick are laid together and spaced slits 12 and 14 at the desired position of the valves are cut transversely of the desired pumping channel to the width of the channel. Then sheets of stop-off material 16 are laid outside the sheets 10 between the slits l2 and 14 and extending at either end through the slits and finally between the sheets 10 outboard of the slits 12 and 14. The width of the stop-off material 16 conforms to the width of the desired channel. The stop-off material may be any dielectric sheet material having a melting point substantially higher than the material to be laminated. Where polyvinyl chloride is used to form the pump, Teflon (tetrafluoroethylene) is a suitable stop-off material. An outer pair of flexible sheets 18 are placed on either side of the assembly, these sheets being preferably of 0.016 inches thickness. Another small sheet of stop-off material 20 is placed somewhere between the slits l2 and 14 and between the sheets 10 and extends beyond the side of the channel. Then the sheets are simultaneously laminated according to a predetermined pattern under heat and pressure sufiicient to fuse together the four sheets of flexible material in the area of that pattern except in those regions where the sheets are separated by stop-off material.

As shown in FIG. 1 the lamination pattern 22 as defined by a dielectric embossing die 23 extends fully along either side of the stop-off material 16 to define the pumping channel. The pattern further extends transversely of the channel to the left of the slits 12 and again to the right of the slits 12 to define semi-elliptical valve flaps 24 adjacent the slits 12. The area around the slits 14 is laminated in the same pattern to define a valve flap 26 ineach sheet 10 opening in the same direction as the flaps 24. As best seen in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4, the flaps 24 are fused together at their upstream end as at 28 whereas the flaps 26 are each fused at their upstream ends as at 30 to an adjacent sheet 18. The sheets l are fused together along the side of the pumping channel as well as transversely as at 28 and 32 to form a completely enclosed air pumping chamber 34 except in the area defined by the stop-off material 20 which provides an inlet to the pumping chamber 34. An additional fused area extends from the edge of the pumping channel adjacent the inlet and forms a finger 36 extending parallel to the pumping chamber to define an air supply channel 37.

The lamination of the several sheets is preferably carried out by the well-known method of dielectric embossing using a die 23 or dies having the shape of the desired pattern 22 as described. By reason of the stopoff material 16 and 20 selective lamination of the several sheets is accomplished. After the lamination step the sheets 16 and 20 of stop-off material are pulled out of the pump. The completed pump then includes an inlet passage 38, and an outlet passage 40 containing valve flaps 26 and .24, respectively. The volume between the valve flaps 24 and 26 and between the sheets 18 exclusive of the pumping chamber 34 comprises a displacement chamber 42.

In operation, the air supply channel 37 is connected by a tube 44 to a pulsating air source 46 thereby causing the air pumping chamber 34 to alternately expand and contract. The inlet and outlet passages 38 and 40 are connected by any suitable means to a blood circulation system and the pump is primed by filling it with blood. As the air pumping chamber 34 is deflated, blood is drawn in through the inlet 38 and through the valve flaps 26 to fill the displacement chamber 42. Blood flow in the opposite direction from the outlet passage 40 is prevented by the valve flaps 24 which seat against the walls of the outlet passage 40. Then when the pumping chamber 34 is inflated, the valve flaps 26 close together and the flaps 24 fold together to permit blood flow through the outlet passage 40. Thus the valve flaps 24 and 26 serve as check valves on either side of the displacement chamber 42 to permit blood flow in only one direction as the pumping chamber 34 pulsates.

There are several advantages of the pump as described when used as an extracorporeal pump during surgery: (1) The pumping action is pulsatile (that is, similar to the normal heart), (2) physiologically accurate pressure pulses are applied to the blood, (3) pumping volume and pulse rate can be adjusted to meet the needs of the body, (4) pumping can be synchronized with the bodies own electrical pulse, (5) the priming volume of the pump is small, (6) the pump is completely disposable and sterile so that extensive servicing before, during and after the operation is not required as with conventional blood pumps, (7) the valve action allows free flow and low turbulence in the open position and is hydraulically active to match the pumping action of the chambers, and (8) blood damage is minimal.

Another embodiment of a blood pump having these same advantages is fabricated as shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and '7. The first step of fabricating this pump is to laminate two sheets 50 of thin flexible material which may be thermally fused such as polyvinyl chloride along straight spaced lines 52 to form a channel 54. Alternatively, this pump may be formed in a previously formed channel of thin flexible material such as is found in a commercial blood oxygenator. The sheets 50 are then slit as at 56 and transversely of the channel 54 to form the free ends of valve flaps 60 and 62. Stopoff material, not shown, is inserted in the channel between the sheets 56. Then a pair of sheets 64 are laid against the outer surfaces of the sheets 50 and the assembly is laminated according to a pattern defined by an embossing die 66 which is very much like that described for the previous embodiment except that an outer opening is allowed to form inlets to the pumping chambers as will appear. In this manner, each sheet 50 is fused to its adjacent sheet 64 according to the pattern 66 to provide the attachments as shown at 68 in FIG. 6. Finally, the stopofl' material is removed.

There is thus formed a completely enclosed channel having an inlet portion 70, an outlet portion 72 and containing the valve flaps 60 and 62 each of which is secured at its upstream end to an outer sheet 64. A displacement chamber 74 lies between the two pairs of valve flaps and a pair of separate air pumping chambers 76 are formed on either side of the displacement chamber '74 and confined between sheets 50 and 64. Each air pumping chamber 76 is connected with an air inlet channel 7 8 adapted to be connected to a pulsating air source. The cross-sectional view of FIG. 7 illustrates the pumping chamber 74 bounded on either side by an air pumping chamber '76 which is connected to the inlet channels 78, all formed from the initially flat sheets 50 and 64. In operation, as the pumping chambers 76 are inflated and deflated, the displacement chamber 74 is compressed and expanded respectively. Since the valve flaps 60 and 62 and cooperate to form check valves operable to permit flow in the same direction, pumping is effected much as in the embodiment of FIGS. 1 4.

FIGS. 8, 9 and i0 illustrate a further embodiment of the invention which is formed without an attached air pumping chamber but which is particularly well-suited for use as an intrathoracic blood pump 80 or artificial heart ventricle. This pump 80 is preferably formed of a medical grade of silicone rubber since its nonthromobogenic qualities are superior to those of polyvinyl chloride and therefore better suited to long term use. The silicon rubber sheets used for fabrication are initially non-vulcanized and thus may be fused together upon application of heat. The pump 80 comprises a pair of outer sheets 82 of silicone rubber 0.030 inches thick reinforced with dacron. A sheet of stop-off material 84, preferably aluminum foil 0.001 inches thick, is inserted between the rubber sheets 82. This stop-off material 84 is generally circular in shape with a pair of upwardly extending neck portions 86 which extend at least to the upper edge of the rubber sheets 82. Adjacent each neck portion 86 are small rectangular flaps 88 of silicone rubber 0.0l inches thick which are placed on either side of the stop-ofi material 84 and are of sufficient width to extend beyond the sides of the neck portion 86. Additional sheets of aluminum stopoff material 90 are placed partially between the flaps 88 and the sheets 82. The stop-off material 90 is elliptically shaped along its lower edge which is spaced above the lower edge of the flaps 88 in the case of the outlet valve which is depicted in F161. 9. The inlet valve is the same as the outlet valve but is inserted so that the flap 88 and the stop-off material )0 for the outlet valve are somewhat differently placed than for the inlet valve. To

laminate the pump the sandwich of material is heated under sufficient pressure to hold the sheets together until the rubber sheets, to the extent they are not separated by the stop-off material, are fused or vulcanized together. Then the aluminum foil stop-ofi' material is dissolved by hydrochloric acid.

Thus there is formed a generally circular displacement chamber 92 between the sheets 82, and inlet and outlet passages 94 each containing a pair of flaps 88 defining a check valve. As indicated schematically in FIG. 9 at 96 at least the lower portion of the flaps 88 of the outlet valve will be secured to its adjacent wall 82 while the upper ends of the flaps will be free to open or close according to the hydraulic action of the displacement chamber 84. In the case of the inlet valve in the left passage 94 of FIG. 8, the free end of the flaps 88 will be the lower ends.

In operation, external pulsing must be applied to alternately compress and relieve the displacement chamber 92 to effect pumping. FIG. 10 diagrammatically illustrates a device for actuating the pump 80. This device includes a bracket 100 having a reaction plate 102 on one side of the pump 80 and a pressure plate 104 on the other side of the portion 80, the pressure plate being reciprocally driven by an electromagnetic motor or solenoid 106. The solenoid 106 is electrically connected to a pulsating electrical power supply 108. This arrangement is intended to be merely suggestive of one means for actuating the pump 80. Where it is desired to simulate a natural heart, two pumps 80 may be used to represent the two heart ventricles. The two pumps 80 would be juxtaposed for simultaneous operation by a pressure actuator and if desired, may share a common wall so that only three sheets 82 and four pairs of valve flaps 88 would be required.

The embodiment of the invention described herein is for purposes of illustration and the scope of the invention is intended to be limited only by the following claims:

1. A liquid pump operable by pulsed air pressure having a displacement chamber with walls formed of two flat sheets of flexible material joined at their sides, inlet and outlet passages communicating with the displacement chamber and having walls formed of the same sheets, an inflatable pumping chamber within the displacement chamber and formed of two flat sheets of flexible material joined at their periphery, inlet means for supplying air to the pumping chamber for varying the volume of the displacement chamber, and inlet and outlet valves in the inlet and outlet passages respectively, the valves comprising pairs of flexible flaps each secured to one of the sheets and cooperating to provide unidirectional fluid flow.

2. A liquid pump operably by pulsed air pressure having a displacement chamberwith walls formed of flat sheets of flexible material joined at their sides, inlet and outlet passages communicating with the displacement chamber and having walls formed of the same sheets, at least a portion of each displacement chamber wall being double layered to define an air chamber between the two wall layers, an inlet means for supplying pulsed air pressure to the air chambers for varying the volume of the displacement chamber, and inlet and outlet alves in the in ct and ou et a sr s ectiv ly, eac h valve comprising a pai r oPfi Xfie flags eac

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2810347 *Dec 30, 1953Oct 22, 1957Gen Motors CorpFluid pump
US3133696 *Feb 19, 1962May 19, 1964Holiday Line IncPump
US3579644 *Feb 26, 1969May 25, 1971Esmond William GArtificial heart
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4245622 *Jun 16, 1978Jan 20, 1981Hutchins Iv Thomas BInflatable/deflatable device for a heart-assist pump
US4290346 *Apr 30, 1979Sep 22, 1981Abbott LaboratoriesIntravenous pump chamber
US4479760 *Dec 28, 1982Oct 30, 1984Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Actuator apparatus for a prepackaged fluid processing module having pump and valve elements operable in response to applied pressures
US4479761 *Dec 28, 1982Oct 30, 1984Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Actuator apparatus for a prepackaged fluid processing module having pump and valve elements operable in response to externally applied pressures
US4479762 *Dec 28, 1982Oct 30, 1984Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc.Prepackaged fluid processing module having pump and valve elements operable in response to applied pressures
US4838889 *Jul 23, 1986Jun 13, 1989University Of Utah Research FoundationVentricular assist device and method of manufacture
US5324422 *Mar 3, 1993Jun 28, 1994Baxter International Inc.User interface for automated peritoneal dialysis systems
US5350357 *Mar 3, 1993Sep 27, 1994Deka Products Limited PartnershipPeritoneal dialysis systems employing a liquid distribution and pumping cassette that emulates gravity flow
US5421823 *Jun 1, 1994Jun 6, 1995Deka Products Limited PartnershipPeritoneal dialysis methods that emulate gravity flow
US5431626 *Mar 3, 1993Jul 11, 1995Deka Products Limited PartnershipLiquid pumping mechanisms for peritoneal dialysis systems employing fluid pressure
US5438510 *Mar 3, 1993Aug 1, 1995Deka Products Limited PartnershipUser interface and monitoring functions for automated peritoneal dialysis systems
US5474683 *Mar 3, 1993Dec 12, 1995Deka Products Limited PartnershipPeritoneal dialysis systems and methods employing pneumatic pressure and temperature-corrected liquid volume measurements
US5628908 *Mar 9, 1995May 13, 1997Deka Products Limited PartnershipPeritoneal dialysis systems and methods employing a liquid distribution and pump cassette with self-contained air isolation and removal
US6769231Jul 19, 2001Aug 3, 2004Baxter International, Inc.Apparatus, method and flexible bag for use in manufacturing
US6814547May 24, 2002Nov 9, 2004Baxter International Inc.Medical fluid pump
US6905314Oct 16, 2001Jun 14, 2005Baxter International Inc.Pump having flexible liner and compounding apparatus having such a pump
US6939111May 24, 2002Sep 6, 2005Baxter International Inc.Method and apparatus for controlling medical fluid pressure
US6953323Jan 31, 2003Oct 11, 2005Baxter International Inc.Medical fluid pump
US7007824Aug 14, 2003Mar 7, 2006Baxter International Inc.Liquid dispenser and flexible bag therefor
US7153286May 24, 2002Dec 26, 2006Baxter International Inc.For draining/pumping the peritoneal cavity during sleep
US7237691Dec 19, 2005Jul 3, 2007Baxter International Inc.Flexible bag for fluent material dispenser
US7500962Jul 22, 2005Mar 10, 2009Baxter International Inc.Medical fluid machine with air purging pump
US7776006Jul 5, 2007Aug 17, 2010Baxter International Inc.Medical fluid pumping system having real time volume determination
US7789849Dec 21, 2006Sep 7, 2010Baxter International Inc.Automated dialysis pumping system using stepper motor
US7815595Dec 21, 2006Oct 19, 2010Baxter International Inc.Automated dialysis pumping system
US7901376Jul 5, 2007Mar 8, 2011Baxter International Inc.Dialysis cassette having multiple outlet valve
US7905853Oct 30, 2007Mar 15, 2011Baxter International Inc.Dialysis system having integrated pneumatic manifold
US7909795Jul 5, 2007Mar 22, 2011Baxter International Inc.Dialysis system having disposable cassette and interface therefore
US8066671Oct 13, 2010Nov 29, 2011Baxter International Inc.Automated dialysis system including a piston and stepper motor
US8070709Jul 21, 2009Dec 6, 2011Baxter International Inc.Peritoneal dialysis machine
US8075526Oct 13, 2010Dec 13, 2011Baxter International Inc.Automated dialysis system including a piston and vacuum source
US8172789Oct 13, 2010May 8, 2012Baxter International Inc.Peritoneal dialysis system having cassette-based-pressure-controlled pumping
US8206338Jul 3, 2007Jun 26, 2012Baxter International Inc.Pumping systems for cassette-based dialysis
US8206339Mar 20, 2009Jun 26, 2012Baxter International Inc.System for monitoring and controlling peritoneal dialysis
US8323231Dec 28, 2006Dec 4, 2012Baxter International, Inc.Method and apparatus for monitoring and controlling peritoneal dialysis therapy
US8328758Mar 14, 2011Dec 11, 2012Baxter International Inc.Dialysis systems and methods having disposable cassette and interface therefore
US8376999Nov 23, 2011Feb 19, 2013Baxter International Inc.Automated dialysis system including touch screen controlled mechanically and pneumatically actuated pumping
US8403880Oct 20, 2009Mar 26, 2013Baxter International Inc.Peritoneal dialysis machine with variable voltage input control scheme
US8465446Mar 14, 2011Jun 18, 2013Baxter International Inc.Noise-reducing dialysis systems and methods of reducing noise in dialysis systems
US8506522Jan 28, 2011Aug 13, 2013Baxter International Inc.Peritoneal dialysis machine touch screen user interface
US8529496Jun 9, 2010Sep 10, 2013Baxter International Inc.Peritoneal dialysis machine touch screen user interface
US8679054Jun 20, 2012Mar 25, 2014Baxter International Inc.Pumping systems for cassette-based dialysis
US8684971Jan 30, 2013Apr 1, 2014Baxter International Inc.Automated dialysis system using piston and negative pressure
US8715235Jul 5, 2007May 6, 2014Baxter International Inc.Dialysis system having disposable cassette and heated cassette interface
US8740836Dec 4, 2013Jun 3, 2014Baxter International Inc.Pumping systems for cassette-based dialysis
US8740837Dec 4, 2013Jun 3, 2014Baxter International Inc.Pumping systems for cassette-based dialysis
EP0195758A2 *Jan 28, 1986Sep 24, 1986Institut Cerac S.A.A fluid pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/394, 417/479
International ClassificationF04B43/00, F04B53/10, F04B43/06, F04B43/02, A61M1/10, F04B43/10
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/06, F04B43/025, F04B43/0054, A61M1/1037, A61M1/106, F04B53/1092, F04B43/10
European ClassificationF04B43/10, F04B43/06, A61M1/10E, F04B43/00D8, F04B43/02P, F04B53/10T2