Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3690664 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 12, 1972
Filing dateOct 26, 1970
Priority dateOct 26, 1970
Publication numberUS 3690664 A, US 3690664A, US-A-3690664, US3690664 A, US3690664A
InventorsGary F Hauke
Original AssigneeGary F Hauke
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tic-tac-toe game
US 3690664 A
Abstract
A game using flippers supported on a horizontal support (1) with different insignia in the upper and lower halves, or (2) with different insignia in the upper and lower halves and at the midpoint. By rolling a ball and turning the flippers, opponents strive to bring all of their insignia in line in the top or bottom halves of the flippers.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Hauke TIC-TAC-TOE GAME [72] Inventor: Gary F. Hauke, 40 E. Main St., P. O. Box 281, New Albany, Ohio 43054 221 Filed: Oct. 26, 1970 211 App1.No.: 83,845

[52] US. Cl. ..273/127 D, 273/118 [51] Int. Cl. ..A63b 67/14 [58] Field of Search ..273/108, 126, 127, 101, 118,

273/102 R, 102 S, 102.1 R, 102.1 E, 102.2 S

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,085,933 7/1937 Vaughan ..273/102 AP 2,427,434 9/1947 Whitehouse ..273/127 D 1,667,086 4/1928 Strombeck ..273/ 127 A 51 Sept. 12,1972

3,599,977 8/1971 Glass ..273/95 R OTHER PUBLICATIONS Amsco Toys Catalog, 3-10-1966.

Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkharn Assistant Examiner-Theatrice Brown Attorney-Gordon C. Mack [57] ABSTRACT A game using flippers supported on a horizontal support 1) with different insignia in the upper and lower halves, or (2) with different insignia in the upper and lower halves and at the midpoint. By rolling a ball and turning the flippers, opponents strive .to bring all of their insignia in line in the top or bottom halves of the flippers.

8 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures ill Patented Sept. 12, 1972 3,690,664

4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. GARY F. HAUKE ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 12, 1972 3,690,664

4 Sheets-Sheet 2 2 IO wqwh INVENT GARY F. HAUK ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 12, 1972 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. GARY F HAUKE BY 2 %/4 (p M ATTORNEY Patented Sept. 12, 1972 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. GARY F. HAUKE 135% 4 ATTORNEY 1 TlC-TAC-TOE GAME The game includes apparatus designed primarily to be played on the lawn, although it may be played on any suitable surface. It is designed primarily to be played by persons opposing each other on opposite sides of the apparatus but the opponents may be located on the same side, if preferred.

Two different types of apparatus are disclosed for playing modifications of the same type of game, referred to herein as the first game and the second game. For each game the apparatus comprises flippers, swivelly mounted on a pivotal horizontal support. The flippers carry different insignia. In the preferred game in which there are an even number of flippers, the insignia on both sides of the flippers are back-to-back the same.'In the other game in which there are only three flippers, it is immaterial whether the insignia are backto-back the same. The flippers are all of the same length. Either game is played by two persons or any larger number of persons divided into sides; usually with no more than two persons on one side.

' The opposing sides usually face each other at a distance of 25 or 30 feet, each side being the same distance from the apparatus.

The game may be 'played with a single ball, but usually each side will have two balls and in each turn a side will roll both balls and then the other side will roll both balls. Then the sides will pick up the balls that have been rolled and continue the game until one side wins. Alternatively, a single ball may be used. Any suitable number of balls may be used. v

The one or more balls are all of the same size and the bottoms of the flippers are spaced from the lawn or other playing surface such a distance that when the ball is rolled over the playing surface it hits the flipper squarely so that it may flip it. The flippers at the level contacted by the ball should be spaced sufliciently so that a ball can roll between two flippers without touching either one, or not making sufficient contact to rotate the flipper. Thus, the ball may never flip a flipper.

The rules of each game are somewhat different, as will be explained. I

THE FIRST GAME In the one game, different types of insignia may be used, and the term insignia is used in a broad sense to include letters, designs, and even colors. The preferred insignia are Xs and s, and the game may be considered a modification of tick-tack-toe. The insignia on all of the flippers may be the same, but this is not necessarily so. For instance, the insignia on one-half of the flippers may be the banners of different girls schools and on the other half different banners of boys schools. Or the insignia on one-half of the flippers may be different birds and the insignia on the other half may be different four-legged animals.

In this game there will be an even number of flippers-usually six, although there may be only four or as many as eight or ten. Before actual play begins, each side selects which of the two different insignia will be its own. Also, before play starts, the flippers are pre-arranged with the same insignia at the top of half of the flippers and the other insignia at the top of the other half. Alternatively, the insignia at the top of the flippers may alternate. Thus, if the insignia are Xs and 0s, the Xs will be at the top of half of the flippers and the 0's will be at the top of the other half. Then the sides take turns, usually flipping a coin to see who starts. By rolling the balls, each side in turn endeavors to flip the flippers tobring all of its insignia to the top half of the flippers. The side which does this first is the winner.

THE SECOND GAME In this game the insignia are usually Xs and Os. There are three insignia on each side of each flipper. If the insignia are back-to-back the same, each side chooses its insignia and endeavors to bring all of these to the top (or the bottom) of the flippers. Ifthe insignia are not back-to-back the same, the object of the game is simply to bring all of the Xs and Os in line.

The games are further described in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a view of two persons playing the first game;

FIG. 2 is a front view of the apparatus with the flippers showing the Xs and Os in line;

FIG. 3 is an end view of the apparatus; 7

FIGS. 4 and 5 are front and rear views of a flipper for the first game; I

I FIGS. 6 and 7 are front and rear views of apparatus that may be used for playing the second game; and

FIGS. 8 and 9 are perspective views of modified flipper constructions.

The game apparatus shown in FIG. 1 comprises six flippers 5 on a horizontal support 6. The ends 8 of the horizontal support are bent down and are branched to provide three prongs 9, 10 and 11 (FIG. 3) which are pushed into the ground 12. Ifthe game is to be used indoors a suitable support of a different type will be provided.

In the preferred type of flipper the outside comers are beveled as at 15. The flippers are spaced so that a ball can pass between beveled corners so that a player may miss the flippers altogether. It is not necessary that the corners be beveled. The flippers are spaced by the spacers 16.

As shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, the flippers are somewhat thickened at the midpoint, but this is not necessary. In this preferred flipper structure, the support 6 passes through the elongated opening 20* in the midpoint of the flipper. Thus, if one of the flippers is hit and spins, the fact that the opening 20 is elongated permits the flipper to slide on the support and quickly come to rest in the vertical position with the support passing through the top of the opening; whereas if the support passed through a circular opening the flipper would not come to rest as exactly or as quickly. The flippers carry the insignia X and O. The background 22 of the X as shown in FIGS. 4 and S is shaded for orange, and the background for the O is shaded for green. The coloring is not essential.

Before the play starts the flippers are arranged as shown in FIG. 1, so that the Xs and the Os alternate at the tops and bottoms of the flippers, or alternatively, the flippers are turned so that the Xs and Os alternate. By a flip of a coin or other means, it is decided which side starts the play. The side then rolls one or two balls as predetermined, in an effort to turn the flippers so that all of its insignia (either X or O) are at the top. Then the other side rolls and endeavors to bring all of the other insignia to the top. As shown by FIGS. 4 and .5, the back-to-back insignia are the same on each flipper. The side that turns all of the flippers so that its insignia are at the top wins. This is a preferred manner of play. Variations may be agreed upon.

The balls 18 are of such a size that they can pass between two flippers without touching. Thus, a player may miss the flippers altogether or a ball mayv not hit a flipper hard enough or squarely enough to flip it. By bevelling the outside corners of the flippers, they may be placed closer together than would otherwise be possible.

FIGS. 1 through 5 illustrate a preferred type of game. FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate an alternate type where there are only three flippers and each flipper includes a third letter at its midpoint, on both sides. Each flipper is different. Three letters are used on each flipper to more fully incorporate a feature of. the well-known Tick- Tack-Toe game which is played with a marker. The letters may be back to back the same, in which case each side of the players will elect its letter and try to bring that letter to the top or bottom of all three flippers.

It will be seen in the drawings that the letters are not back to back the same, but the arrangements of the letters are the same on the opposite sides of the flippers, at least insofar as the top and bottom letters are concerned. With this arrangement of the insignia on the flippers, it is only necessary for one side to bring all of one of the letters to the tops of the flippers in order to win the game. All of the letters will then be the same at the bottoms of the flippers also. Thus, this game is similar in some respects to the preferred game described above, but not as exciting.

FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate modified types of flippers. In FIG. 8 there are four blades 30, on two of which the letter X is on the front and back sides, and the letter O is on the front and back sides of the other two blades. Where the blades are joined there is an opening 32 with extensions in four directions paralleling the blades so that the blades will always settle with two blades vertical and two horizontal, whether the Xs be up or the Os be up. The game is played just as illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 5, the only difi'erence being the different type of flipper used.

Similarly, in FIG. 9, in which the flipper comprises three blades 41, 42 and 43, the letters X and O are back-to-back on two of the blades 41 and 42, and the third blade 43 may, if desired, be a blank, or a set of inthem without touching the flippers or by touching one flipper insufficiently to cause it to flip.

Iclaim:

1. Game apparatus which comprises a horizontal pivotal support and a plurality of aligned flippers each individually swivelly supported at their midpoints on the support so as to come to rest with either end up,

each fli r bein divided lon itudinall into first and second fa fi ts, sai first part h ving a f ont side and back side and said second part having a front side and a back side, a first insigniaon said front side of said first part of each flipper and on said back side of said first part, all of said first insignia being similar, a second insignia on said front side of said second part of each flipper and on said back side of said second part, all of said second insignia being similar to one another and being different from said first insignia, the insignia on the front side and back side of the first part of a flipper being the same, and the insignia on the front side and back side of the second part of a flipper being the same.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 in which each flipper is flat throughout its length.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 in which there are only three flippers.

4. The game apparatus of claim 1 in which the insignia in the first parts of all of the flippers are the same and the insignia in the second parts of all of the flippers are the same, said first and second parts being equidistant from said midpoints.

5. The game apparatus of claim 4 in which the insignia first parts on both sides of each flipper are large Xs back-to-back and there are large Os back-to-back in the surfaces of the second parts of all of the flippers.

6. The apparatus of claim 1 in which there are an even number of flippers.

7. The game apparatus of claim 6 in which there are six flippers.

8. The game apparatus of claim 1 in which there are three flippers.

PO we emme PATENT @FFEGEE A v m Patent No. 65

In ventofls) Gary F 0 Haukfi peers in the above-identified patent "it is certified that error ap ereby corrected as shown below:

and that said Letters Patent are h ineexrt w the w befe re firm Signed and sealed this 29th day of May 1975.

(SEAL) A'tcest:

EDWARD M.PLETCIHER,JR. ROBERT GOTTSCHALK Commissioner of Patent;

Attesting Officer

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1667086 *Jan 21, 1928Apr 24, 1928John F StrombeckGame toy
US2085933 *Jun 13, 1936Jul 6, 1937Vaughan David LTarget
US2427434 *Nov 29, 1944Sep 16, 1947Whitehouse BarbaraPivoted target member
US3599977 *Mar 17, 1969Aug 17, 1971Marvin Glass & AssociatesRotary block tic-tac-toe board and projectiles
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *Amsco Toys Catalog, 3 10 1966.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3770276 *Dec 17, 1971Nov 6, 1973Marvin Glass & AssociatesPendulum-type bagatelle game
US3785656 *Sep 15, 1972Jan 15, 1974F GybowskiGame device
US3897952 *Mar 4, 1974Aug 5, 1975Marvin Glass & AssociatesSkill type projectile game
US4116443 *Jun 20, 1977Sep 26, 1978L.J.N. Toys, Ltd.Pivoting target array game
US5288275 *Feb 16, 1993Feb 22, 1994St Peter Gail DPivoting target bowling training apparatus
US5799938 *Aug 12, 1997Sep 1, 1998Lewis; Ronald L.Ball and ring games and game structures
US6068488 *Mar 5, 1998May 30, 2000Michael N. SinsheimerGame and training device for teaching soccer skills
US6155571 *Mar 26, 1998Dec 5, 2000Reinertsen; Tormod K.Toy rotating target assembly
US6478301Nov 1, 2001Nov 12, 2002Aaron D. WitmeyerSpinning and translating target for firearms
US7097589 *Mar 4, 2004Aug 29, 2006Sports Imports, Inc.Safety jump training apparatus
US7114725 *Mar 17, 2004Oct 3, 2006Better Bilt Products, Inc.Rotary shooting target
US7530925Jul 19, 2007May 12, 2009Sports Imports, Inc.Portable jump training apparatus
US20130270767 *Dec 24, 2012Oct 17, 2013Joseph Charles Shirvinski, SR.Jungle bocce game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/127.00D, 273/118.00R
International ClassificationA63F9/02, A63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0204, A63F3/00094
European ClassificationA63F9/02B