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Publication numberUS3691646 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 19, 1972
Filing dateJan 22, 1971
Priority dateJan 22, 1971
Also published asCA1006346A1
Publication numberUS 3691646 A, US 3691646A, US-A-3691646, US3691646 A, US3691646A
InventorsRuffolo Hector Michael
Original AssigneeRuffolo Hector Michael
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hair dryer
US 3691646 A
Abstract
A chair-type hair dryer wherein the flow of drying air is conducted through a system of obliquely directed passageways in a liner shell mounted within a drying helmet. The passageways are oriented to direct the drying air through the user's hair in a direction following the contour of the head toward the rear portion of the head and away from the face. Means are provided for selectively diverting a controllable portion of the drying air through a plurality of apertures in the back of the chair and against the user's back and shoulders providing a soothing and relaxing effect.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Ruffolo [451 Sept. 19, 1972 HAIR DRYER 2,992,604 7/1961 Trotman et al ..98/2.03 [72] Inventor: Hector Michael Ruflolo, 13369 Mc- Culloch, Sarato ga, Calif. 95070 [22] Filed: Jan. 22, 1971 [21] Appl. N0.: 108,830

[52] US. Cl ..34/90, 34/99 [51] Int. Cl ..F26b 19/00 [58] Field of Search ..34/90, 99; 98/203 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,320,679 5/1967 Collins ..34/99 3,058,231 10/1962 Romito ..34/99 X 2,703,134 3/l955 Mossor ..34/90 X 2,339,159 1/1944 Duncan et al ..34/90 X Primary Examiner-Carroll B. Dority, Jr.

' Attorney-Townsend & Townsend 5 7 ABSTRACT A chair-type hair dryer wherein the flow of drying air is conducted through a system of obliquely directed passageways in a liner shell mounted within a drying helmet. The passageways are oriented to direct the drying air through the user's hair in a direction follow ing the contour of the head toward the rear portion of the head and away from the face. Means are provided for selectively diverting a controllable portion of the drying air through a plurality of apertures in the back of the chair and against the users back and shoulders providing a soothing and relaxing effect.

14 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PlTENTEDsms mm 3.691. 646

sneer a or 2 F IG HECTOR MICHAQC QJI OLO u u BY FIG 5 WMZM ATTORNFYS HAIR DRYER flow of heated drying air is directed through a number of holes in a drying hood and impinges against the hair at an angle substantially normal to thesurface of the head. This has the effect not only of creatingan uneven and turbulent flow of drying air but also unnecessarily heating theusers scalp with a consequent feeling of discomfort.Further, such conventional drying hoods cover most or all of the users forehead producing added discomfort in this area due to the amount of heat unnecessarily introduced at a location where no drying is required.

In addition, with conventional drying hoods a steady stream of heated air flows out the front of the hood and across the users face. This is not only annoying and uncomfortable but tends to unduly dry the skin in these areas.

According to the present invention, the incoming flow of drying air is conducted through a plurality of diagonally directed passageways in a liner shell mounted within a drying hood. These passageways are uniformly distributed over the liner shell and are so formed that the angle of impingement of drying air on the users head creates a tangential airflow following the contour of the head and being directed at all points toward the center rear portion of the head. This directional airflow has the effect of increasing the drying rate since the air flows through the hair along a controlled path and not directly at thehead as with conventional designs. Additionally, in the case of those passageways located near the user's face and forehead, the rearward directed airflow eliminates any undesirable forward flow of drying air downward across the user's face. This latter'resultmakes possible a helmetshaped hood design which more closely conformsto the users hairline and allows easier entry and withdrawal of the head.

Since the problem of hot air escaping from the upper frontal area of the hood has been eliminated by the liner shell design the helmet of the present invention need not extend downward over the forehead to confine heated air within it. This allows easier entry and withdrawal ofthe user's head since she merely seats herself on the dryer chair and slides directly back into position rather than having to more up into the hood from underneath as with prior art devices. The improved hood design also includes downwardly extending side portions and an elongatedrear section which covers the lower part of the back of the users head and her neck, an area heretofore inadequately treatedby conventional designs. The drying air introduced at these points has a tendency to rise into the upper portions of the helmet aiding in the overall directional circulation of air produced by the angularly oriented passageways in the liner shell.

The helmet is provided with an air distribution system which introduces drying air into the chamber formed betweenthe helmet and liner shell both at the back of the helmet and on both sides thereof at the front. This air duct system is so designed that the air flow is substantially equalized throughout the chamber resulting in an even and uniform distribution of air through the various passageways regardless of their position within the helmet.

A further feature of the present invention is the provision of anumber of air vents in the chairback area which supports the users back and shoulders, and means for selectively diverting a controllable portion of the heated air flowing toward the helmet into a cavity in the chair back. This back and shoulder warmer provides a soothing and relaxing effect and is especially therapeutic in the case of tight muscles, stiff neck or sore back. This chairback airflow can be adjusted or eliminated by the user from a control located on the arm of the chair.

These and other objects, features and advantages of the'presentinvention will be more readily apparent upon reading the following detailed description with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a pictorial representation of a principal embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a pictorial representation of a hair drying hood according to the prior art;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of a prior art liner shell taken along a substantially horizontal plane;

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of the liner shell of the present invention taken along a substantially horizontal plane;

FIG. 5 is a rear view of the hair dryer of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 6 is an enlarged view of a portion of the rear of the hair dryer shown in FIG. 5, with the drying helmet in a raised position.

Referring now to the drawings in which like numerals in the different views refer to the same element, there is provided a chair-type or salonhair drying device 10 having a chair 12 which supports a person whose hair is to be dried in a variety of adjustable positions from full upright to semi-reclining. Mounted on chair l2 and positioned above it is drying helmet l4. Hollow mounting column 16 is affixed to the back of the chair and allows vertical movement of helmet 14 with respect to the chair so as to comfortably accommodate subjects of varying body proportions and height. The drying helmet 14 is provided with a downwardly extending rear section 14a which rides over and is guided by mounting column 16. A set screw 17 is provided to fix the vertical position of the helmet on mounting column 16.

Chair 12 is formed with an interior back wall 18 and an exterior back wall 20 which are spaced apart to define a cavity or chamber 22 within the chair back. Interior back wall 18 is provided with a number of vent holes 24 located in the area thereof which contacts the subjects back and shoulders. Chair 12 is also provided with two arm sections 26 on which are located the various controls referred to hereinafter.

Mounted on the exterior back wall 20 of chair 12 is an air conditioning unit 28 of conventional design which generates a supply of heated air to be used in drying the subects hair. The output of air conditioning unit 28 is connected to the lower end of hollow mounting column 16 the interior of which comprises an air intake duct 30. The upper end of air duct 30 is connected to the helmet air distribution system to be described.

Helmet 14 is roughly spherical in shape with the front and bottom portions removed to receive the subjects head and neck directly through the front of the helmet. Because of considerations to be more fully discussed below, a helmet design is possible which closely follows the users hairline and thus the helmet presents an overall appearance similar to a football helmet with the subjects face and forehead fully exposed. In addition, the elongated downwardly extending rear section 14a of the helmet covers the lower part of the rear of the subjects head and her neck.

The helmet design of the present invention is to be contrasted with prior art drying hoods as represented by that shown in FIG. 2. It can be seen from the drawing that such conventional drying hoods in operation extend downwardly over the subjects forehead to a greater extent than does the helmet of the present invention. In addition, conventional drying hoods do not satisfactorily cover the lower rear portion of the head and the neck and consequently drying takes longer in these areas.

A perforate liner shell 32 is removably mounted within the helmet as by screws or other conventional fastening means. Liner shell 32 is of the same general shape as the interior of helmet 14 but of smaller size so that a chamber 34 is formed between the two. This chamber serves as an air manifold for the helmet air distribution system, which will now be described.

Liner shell 32 is provided with a number of passageways 33 which extend through the shell. These passageways are directed diagonally through the liner with respect to a line normal to the liner interior surface and the direction of the various passageways over the surface of the liner shell is varied in such a manner that the air entering the drying cavity 36 formed by the liner interior surface is at all points directed toward the upper rear portion of the cavity. This creates a tangential or laminar air flow which follows the contour of the subjects head. The drying air flows through the subjects hair and along the head rather than impinging directly against the head as with conventional designs.

This important difference between the present invention and the prior art can be more readily understood by referring to FIGS. 3 and 4. FIG. 3 is a sectional view of a conventional hood liner taken along a horizontal plane and FIG. 4 is a similar view of the liner shell of the present invention.

The directionally controlled airflow has the effect of maximizing drying effectiveness and reducing discomfort to the user. Additionally, in the case of those passageways located near the users face and forehead, the rearward directed airflow eliminates any undesirable forward flow of drying air downward across the users face, which in turn makes possible the improved helmet design of the present invention.

An air distribution system is mounted within helmet 14 in the chamber 34 formed between the inner surface of helmet l4 and the outer surface of liner shell 32. This system includes central air conduit 38 communicating with intake air duct 30 at the bottom of the helmet rear section 14a. Conduit 38 terminates at its upper end at the upper rear portion of the helmet chamber 34 in a discharge orifice 44. Two side conduits 40 branch from central conduit 38 at point 42 just below orifice 44. These side conduits 40 are directed along the sides of chamber 34 and have their discharge orifices 46 located at the front portion of chamber 34. This design is intended to overcome the problem recognized by the prior art that if a single air discharge is provided at the rear of the helmet the force of the airflow through the liner 32 will diminish in a direction towards the front of the drying cavity 36. The air distribution 1 system of the present invention tends to substantially equalize the airflow at all points within chamber 34 by introducing drying air simultaneously at the front and back of the chamber. The uniform flow is further aided by forming a necked restriction 48 on central conduit 38 at its discharge end to create sufficient back pressure to equalize the airflow through the various conduit branches.

The hair drying apparatus of the present invention is provided with a means of selectively diverting a controllable portion of the heated air flowing into helmet l4 and directing this air through the vents 24 in the chair back 18 so as to produce a relaxing and therapeutic effect on the subject.

An aperture 50 is provided in mounting column 16 in the surface thereof which contacts the chair back exterior wall 20. Contiguous to aperture 50 is a corresponding aperture 52 in chair-back exterior wall 20. Apertures 50 and 52 are in registration with one another so that air can flow from air duct 30 to chair back cavity 22. A sliding gate 54 is guided by tracks 56 so that it can be interposed between aperture 50 and aperture 52 thereby cutting off part or all of the airflow from air duct 30 into chair back cavity 22.

Gate 54 is operably connected to control 58 positioned on the arm of chair 12 through control cable 60. By means of control 58, a desired portion of drying air flowing through air duct 30 can be diverted into the chair back cavity 22, through vents 24 and against the users back and shoulders providing a soothing and relaxing effect.

Chair 12 is also provided with control 62 which permits the user to adjust the chair in any one of a range of positions from fully upright to semi-reclining. Other features such as a lower back massaging unit or helmet stereo headphones can be included for added comfort and relaxation and the additional controls located on the chair arms.

Various other modifications of the embodiments shown and described are contemplated and will be apparent to those skilled in the art as not departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as hereinafter defined by the appended claims.

What is claimed is: g

I. A chair-type.hair dryer comprising a chair and a drying helmet mounted on said chair, a source of drying air, and air discharge means distributed throughout 3. A hair dryer as recited in claim 2 wherein said airflow diverting means comprises said chair being provided with a plurality of air vents formed in the surface thereof which support the users back and shoulders and means for selectively diverting a controllable portion of said drying air through said air vents.

4. A hair dryer as recited in claim 1 wherein said drying helmet is shaped to conform to the users hair line, said helmet having the form of a substantially spherical shell with the frontal and bottom portions removed to receive the users head through the front thereof and to allow the users face and forehead to be exposed, and having elongate side and rear portions to cover the. lower rear portion of the users head and neck;

said air discharge means includes a perforate liner shell removably mounted within said helmet and having substantially the same shape as said helmet and being spaced inwardly therefrom to define a chamber therebetween, said liner further having a plurality of passageways extending therethrough, a number of said passageways being oriented with their axes obliquely inclined to the surface of said liner and being collectively arranged to direct air introduced into said chamber tangentially along the contour of the users head and through the users hair in a direction toward the back of the head and away from the face; and

air distribution means for introducing drying air into said chamber.

5. A hair dryer as recited in claim 4 wherein said means for introducing drying air into said chamber comprises a central air duct connected at its lower end to said source of drying air and communicating at its upper end with the rear portion of said chamber and at least two side ducts connected at one end to said main duct and terminating at the other end at a position near the frontportion of said chamber on either side of sai helmet.

6. A hair dryer as recited in claim 5 wherein said central air duct is provided with a necked restriction at its upper end, whereby the flow of air through said side ducts is equalized with that issuing from said central duct at the rear of said chamber.

7. A hair drying device comprising:

a. a chair for supporting a subject whose hair is to be dried, said chair having a plurality of apertures formed in the surface thereof which support the subjects back and shoulders;

. a dryinghelmet mounted on said chair and shaped to conform to the subjects hairline, said helmet comprising a substantially spherical shell having the frontal and bottom portions removed to receive the subjects head directly through the front thereof and to allow the subjects face and forehead to be exposed, and having elongate side and rear portions to cover the lower rear portion of the subjects head and the neck;

.c. a perforate liner shell defining a hair drying cavity and being removably mounted within said helmet and having substantially the same shape as said helmetand being spaced inwardly therefrom to define a chamber therebetween, said liner further having a plurality of passageways extending therethrough at the front and rear with substantially all of said passageways at the front having an axis obliquely inclined to the surfaceof said liner and being collectively arranged to direct air introduced into said chamber in a streamline airflow toward the rear portion of said cavity and tangentially along the subjects head and through the subjects hair in a direction toward the back of the subjects head and away from the face; and

d. air distribution means for introducing drying air into said chamber including means for selectively diverting a controllable portion of said drying air through the apertures in the back of said chair.

8. A hair dryer as recited in claim 7 wherein said means for introducing drying air into said chamber comprises a central air duct connected at its lower end to said source of drying air and communicating at its upper end with the rear portion of said chamber and at least two side ducts connected at one end to said main duct and terminating at the other end at a position near the front portion of said chamber on either side of said helmet.

9. A hair dryer as recited in claim 8 wherein said central air duct is provided with a necked restriction at its upper end, whereby the flow of air through said side ducts is equalized with that issuing from said central duct at the rear of said chamber.

10. In a salon-type hair dryer having a chair for supporting a subject whose hair is to be dried and a drying hood mounted above the chair for receiving the subjects head the improvement comprising the combination of a. a perforate liner shell defining a hair drying cavity and being removably mounted within said hood and being spaced inwardly therefrom to define a chamber therebetween, said liner further having a plurality of passageways extending therethrough at the front and rear with substantially all of said passageways at the from having an axis obliquely inclined to the surface of said liner and being collectively arranged to direct air introduced into said chamber in a streamline airflow toward the rear portion of said cavity and tangentially along the subjects head and through the subjects hair in a direction toward the back of the subjects head and away from the face; and

b. air distribution means for introducing drying air into said chamber including means for diverting a controllable portion of said drying air through a pluralityof apertures formed in the surface of said chair which supports the subjects back and shoulders.

11. A hair dryer as recited in claim 10 wherein said means for introducing drying air into said chamber comprises a central air duct connected at itslower end to said source of drying air and communicating at its upper end with the rear portion of said chamber and at least two side ducts connected atone end to said main duct and terminating at the other end at a position near the front portion of said chamber on either side of said helmet.

12. A hair dryer as recited in claim 11 wherein said central air duct is provided with a necked restriction at its upper end, whereby the flow of airthrough said side ducts is equalized with that issuing from said central duct at the rear of said chamber.

13. A perforate liner shell defining a hair drying cavity for mounting within a hair drying hood and being so formed as to conform to a users hairline and cover a user's head of hair, said liner having a plurality of passageways extending therethrough at the front and rear with substantially all of said passageways at the front having an axis obliquely inclined to the surface of said liner shell and being collectively arranged to direct drying air introduced under pressure at the exterior surface thereof into said cavity in a streamline airflow toward the rear portion through the users hair in a direction following the contour of the head and toward the back of the head and away from the face.

14. A salon-type hair dryer comprising:

a. a chair for supporting a subject whose hair is to be dried;

b. a drying helmet mounted on said chair and shaped to conform to the subjects hairline, said helmet comprising a substantially spherical shell having the frontal and bottom portions removed to receive the subjects head directly through the front thereof and to allow the subjects face and forehead to be exposed, and having elongate side and rear portions to cover the lower rear portion of the subjects head and the neck;

c. a perforate liner shell defining a hair drying cavity and being removably mounted within said helmet and having substantially the same shape as said helmet and being spaced inwardly therefrom to define a chamber therebetween, said liner further having a plurality of passageways extending therethrough with substantially all of the passageways at the frontal portion of said liner shell being disposed with their axes obliquely inclined to said liner shell so as to direct air introduced into said chamber in a streamline airflow toward the rear portion of said cavity and tangentially along the top and sides of subjects head 'toward the rear portion thereof and away from the face; and

d. air distribution means for introducing drying air into said chamber.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification34/90, 34/99, D28/10
International ClassificationA45D20/26, A45D20/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D20/26
European ClassificationA45D20/26