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Publication numberUS3693576 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1972
Filing dateJan 6, 1971
Priority dateJan 6, 1971
Publication numberUS 3693576 A, US 3693576A, US-A-3693576, US3693576 A, US3693576A
InventorsDriscoll James A
Original AssigneeDriscoll James A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Outboard motor stabilizer
US 3693576 A
Abstract
An elongated outboard motor prop including a first forked end for embracingly engaging the front side of the lower end of the upstanding propeller shaft housing of an outboard motor and provided with strap means for releasably securing the propeller shaft housing in the first forked end of the prop. The second end of the prop has a mounting bracket oscillatably supported therefrom for swinging of the prop relative to the mounting bracket about an axis extending transversely of the second end of the prop. The mounting bracket is inturn oscillatably supported from a mounting plate for swinging about an axis relative to the latter disposed at right angles to the first mentioned axis and the mounting plate is provided with means for at least semi-permanent securement to the rear transverse cross member of a trailer frame. This mounting of the prop enables the latter to be used as a prop in securing an associated outboard motor in a tilted position or to be swung to an out of the way position extending along and disposed behind the rear transverse frame member of the associated boat trailer.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Driscoll [451 Sept. 26, 1972 OUTBOARD MOTOR STABILIZER [72] Inventor: James A. Driscoll, 506 Roosevelt,

Sand Springs, Okla. 74063 22 Filed: Jan.6, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 104,422

[52] US. Cl. ..l15/4l R, 280/414 R, 248/4 [5 1] Int. Cl. ..B63h 5/12 [58] Field of Search ..l 15/41, l7, l8, .5; 280/414,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,901,267 8/1959 Holsclaw ..280/4l4 R X 2,939,670 6/1960 Anderson ..280/4l4 R X Primary Examiner-Milton Buchler Assistant Examiner-Carl A. Rutledge Attorney-Clarence A. OBrien and Harvey B. Jacobson [5 7] ABSTRACT An elongated outboard motor prop including a first forked end for embracingly engaging the front side of the lower end of the upstanding propeller shaft housing of an outboard motor and provided with strap means for releasably securing thepropeller shaft housing in the first forked end of the prop. The second end of the prop has a mounting bracket oscillatably supported therefrom for swinging of the prop relative to the mounting bracket about an axis extending transversely of the second end of the prop. The mounting bracket is inturn oscillatably supported from a mounting plate for swinging about an axis relative to the latter disposed at right angles to the first mentioned axis and the mounting plate is provided with means for at least semi-permanent securement to the rear transverse cross member of a trailer frame. This mounting of the prop enables the latter to be used as a prop in securing an associated outboard motor in a tilted position or to be swung to an out of the way position extending along and disposed behind the rear transverse frame member of the associated boat trailer.

10 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTED SEP 2 6 I972 James A; prised/l When an outboard motor boat is being transported from one location to another on a boat trailer, the outboard motor or motors of the boat are tilted forwardly at their upper ends so as to increase the clearance between the ground and the propeller or propellers of the outboard motors. In addition, this forward tilting of the upper end of an outboard motor more closely centers the weight of the outboard motor directly over the transom of the associated boat and thus enables the boat to be trailed over rough roads without placing torsional stresses on the boat transom. However, conventional outboard motors are provided with tilt stop mechanisms which still allow some torsional forces to be directed upon an associated boat transom when the boat is being trailed over rough roads.

It is accordingly the main object of this invention to provide an outboard motor stabilizer or prop which may be readily connected between the trailer upon which an outboard boat is disposed and the outboard motor of the boat thereby relieving the transom of the boat from any torsional forces thereon due to the trailer being towed over rough roads.

Another object of this invention is to provide an outboard motor stabilizer in accordance with the preceding object and constructed in a manner whereby the stabilizer or prop may be readily removably engaged with the associated outboard motor when it is desired to use the stabilizer or prop.

Another object of this invention is to provide an outboard motor stabilizer in accordance with the preceding objects and which may be readily shifted to an inoperative out of the way position extending transverse- 1y of the rear of the associated trailer when the associated boat is in use or being loaded on or unloaded from the trailer.

A final object of this invention to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide an outboard motor stabilizer which will conform to conventional forms of manufacture, be of simple construction and easy to use so as to provide a device thatwill be economically feasible, long lasting and relatively trouble free in operation.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of the rear end of a boat trailer having an outboard motor boat positioned thereon and with the outboard motor stabilizer of the instant invention operatively connected between the rear transverse member of the trailer and the lower end of the upstanding propeller shaft housing of the outboard motor;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 but illustrating the stabilizer in a retracted out of the way position and with the propeller shaft housing of the outboard motor vertically disposed;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view illustrating the mounting bracket and mounting plate portions of the outboard motor stabilizer; and

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the outboard motor stabilizer.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, the numeral 10 generally designates a conventional form of trailer provided with opposite side longitudinal frame members 12 and 14 interconnected by means of a plurality of transverse frame members 16.

An outboard motor boat referred to in general by the reference numeral 18 is positioned on the boat trailer 10 and includes a rear transom 20 from which a conventional outboard motor referred to in general by the reference numeral 22 is supported. The outboard motor 22 includes an upstanding propeller shaft housing 24 provided with a cavitation plate 26 and the outboard motor stabilizer of the instant invention is generally referred to by the reference numeral 28.

The rear transverse frame member 16 of the trailer 10 is provided with the usual reflectors 30 and holddown anchor fasteners 32 to which the lower ends of a pair of hold-down tension members 34 are secured, the upper ends of the tension members 34 including padded hooks 36 engaged over the upper central marginal edge portion 38 of the transom 20 in order to hold the boat 18 in stationary position on the trailer 10.

The outboard motor stabilizer 28 includes an elongated arm assembly referred to in general by the reference numeral 40 and the assembly 40 includes a pair of generally L-shaped tubular members 42 including long legs 44 and right angularly directed short legs 46. The long legs 44 are disposed in side-by-side contacting relation and are secured together by means of suitable fasteners 46, 48 and 50 secured therethrough. The short legs 46 are generally aligned and project outwardly from opposite sides of the arm assembly 40. The fasteners 48 and 50 each include an anchor ring defining end 50 and an elongated flexible tension member 52 is provided and has a hook 54 on one end engageable with one anchor ring 50 and a hook 56 on the other end engageable with the other anchor ring 50.

A mounting plate 58 is provided and is secured to the central portion of the rear transverse member 16 by means of suitable fasteners 60 and a mounting bracket 62 is oscillatably supported from the mounting plate 58 by means of a pivot fastener 64.

The mounting'bracket 62 defines a pair of apertured mounting cars 66 between which the free ends of the long legs 44 are pivotally securedby means of a pivot fastener 68 extending between the mounting ears 66 and through the free ends of the legs 44. From FIGS. 1 and 3 of the drawings, it will be noted that the pivot axis defined by the fastener 68 is disposed at generally right angles to the pivot axis defined by the pivot fastener 64. Accordingly, the end of the arm assembly 40 remote from the short legs 46 may be said to be universally supported from the center of the rear transverse member 16 of the trailer 10.

The adjacent ends of the short legs 46 smoothly curve into the ends of the long legs 44 remote from the mounting bracket and form a forked end on the arm assembly 40 for embracingly receiving and craddling the forward side of the lower end of the propeller shaft housing 22 immediately above the cavitation plate 26.

In operation, after the boat 18 has been loaded on the trailer 10, the outboard motor stabilizer 28 may be unlashed from its stored position illustrated in FIG. 2 and swung to the position thereof illustrated in FIG. 1 after the outboard motor 22 has been tilted from the position thereof illustrated in FIG. 2 to the position thereof illustrated in FIG. 1. Of course, the forked end of the arm assembly 40 is engaged with the front side of the lower end of the propeller shaft housing 24 immediately above the cavitation plate 26 and the tension member 52 has its opposite ends engaged with the anchor rings 50 after the mid-portion of the tension member 52 has been passed behind the lower end of the propeller shaft housing 24.

With the outboard motor 22 thus supported, with the center of gravity of the outboard motor 22 generally centered over the upper marginal edge portion of the transom 20, any tendency for the rearwardly and downwardly inclined portion of the propeller shaft housing 24to bounce up and down will be prevented by the stabilizer 28. Of course, when it is desired to remove the boat, 18 from the trailer 10, the tension member 52 may be disengaged from one of the anchor rings 50 and the arm assembly 40 may be swung either to the position thereof illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings or to a downwardly inclined ground engaging position in order to allow the boat 18 to slide rearwardly relative to the trailer 10.

If it is desired, the long legs 44 of the arm assembly 40 may be secured together by welding in addition to the fasteners 46, 48 and 50 and it is to be noted that the various components of the outboard motor stabilizer will be constructed of corrosion resistant materials.

The outboard motor stabilizer may be made in various sizes in accordance with the needs of the user and it will be noted that the stabilizer may also be used in conjunction with the outboard portion of an inboard/outboard drive assembly.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. In combination, a boat trailer for supporting a boat thereon and including a rear transverse member, an outboarddrive propeller shaft housing support and stabilizer comprising an elongated support arm assembly including a first end adapted for removable securement to the lower end of an upstanding propeller shaft housing, a mount base generally centered on said transverse member intermediate its opposite ends, a mounting bracket oscillatably mounted on said mount base for swinging about a first generally horizontal axis extending transversely of said transverse member, and means pivotally securing the second end of said support arm assembly to said mounting bracket for oscillation relative thereto about a second axis extending transversely of said support arm second end.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein the effective length of said support arm is less than one half the length of said transverse member.

3. The combination of claim 1 wherein said first end of said arm is forked and is adapted to seatingly receive said housing between the fork arms thereof.

4. The combination of claim 3 including means carried s id first end fo remova l securi aid prope i er housing in seateci position Be tween 83% fork arms.

5. The combination of claim 1 wherein said support arm assembly comprises a pair of elongated members secured together in side-by-side relation and whose ends at said first end of said support arm assembly diverge away from each other.

6. The combination of claim 5 wherein said elongated members and said second axis are disposed in the same plane.

7. In combination, a boat trailer for supporting a boat thereon and including a rear portion, an outboard drive propeller shaft housing support and stabilizer comprising an elongated support arm assembly including a first end adapted for removable securement to the lower end of an upstanding propeller shaft housing, means carried by a second end of said support arm assembly and said rear portion universally coupling said second end to the rear portion of said trailer for angular displacement of said arm assembly in all directions relative to said rear portion, whereby said arm assembly, when in use, may project rearwardly from said rear portion and be swung through a vertical plane and, when not in use, may be swung to and be secured in a retracted position closely adjacent rear portion extending transversely of said trailer.

8. The combination of claim 7 wherein said first end of said arm is forked and is adapted to seatingly receive said housing between the fork arms thereof.

9. The combination of claim 8 including means carried by said first end for removably securing said propeller housing in seated position between said fork arms.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein said support arm assembly comprises a pair of elongated members secured together in side-by-side relation and whose ends at said first end of said support arm assembly diverge away from each other.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2901267 *Oct 7, 1955Aug 25, 1959Holsclaw Charles HOutboard motor support
US2939670 *Sep 19, 1958Jun 7, 1960Anderson Sidney LOutboard motor supporting trailer attachment
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3941344 *Apr 20, 1973Mar 2, 1976Paterson Albert EMotor support
US4125236 *May 11, 1977Nov 14, 1978Landwerlen Joseph ETransom saver
US4331431 *Jul 21, 1980May 25, 1982Estes Ronald LTransom saver
US4501561 *Jul 14, 1983Feb 26, 1985Speelman Paul GBrace device for motor boat drive unit
US4651964 *Apr 21, 1986Mar 24, 1987Kendrick Billy JTraveling support rod for outboard engine
US4828186 *Feb 22, 1988May 9, 1989Fulton Manufacturing CorporationBoat motor support
US4842239 *Jan 11, 1988Jun 27, 1989Darrell KinseyOutboard boat motor support device
US4911395 *Mar 23, 1989Mar 27, 1990Jones Jr John MMotor block for outboard motor with power tilt and trim apparatus
US5102358 *May 14, 1990Apr 7, 1992Outboard Marine CorporationMarine propulsion device with trailing mechanism including positive mechanical latch
US5178568 *Jul 1, 1991Jan 12, 1993Outboard Marine CorporationMarine propulsion device with trailing mechanism including positive mechanical latch
US5795202 *Sep 4, 1996Aug 18, 1998Williams; Carl F.Outboard motor support device
US5888109 *May 5, 1997Mar 30, 1999Poll; Steven J.Outboard motor support device
US6447350 *May 14, 2001Sep 10, 2002James L. ThompsonTransom saver apparatus
US6659817Oct 15, 2002Dec 9, 2003Brunswick CorporationAlignment system for an outboard motor
US7556545Aug 3, 2006Jul 7, 2009Brunswick CorporationVariable angle outboard motor support
US20080029683 *Aug 3, 2006Feb 7, 2008Adrian DraghiciVariable angle outboard motor support
USRE39414 *Mar 8, 2001Nov 28, 2006Poll Steven JOutboard motor support device
WO2006060899A1 *Dec 2, 2005Jun 15, 2006Anchor Welding Inc.Support assembly for loading and securing a tender
Classifications
U.S. Classification440/55, 248/642, 280/414.1
International ClassificationB63H20/00, B63H20/36
Cooperative ClassificationB63H20/36
European ClassificationB63H20/36