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Publication numberUS3693617 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1972
Filing dateFeb 5, 1971
Priority dateFeb 5, 1971
Publication numberUS 3693617 A, US 3693617A, US-A-3693617, US3693617 A, US3693617A
InventorsRaymond H Trott
Original AssigneeRaymond H Trott
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fracture reducing appliance for the arm
US 3693617 A
Abstract
A fracture reducing appliance having a horizontal base, a vertically oriented standard attached to the base, a unitary brace and arm support member, and an expansible and contractible finger trap. The unitary brace and arm support member has a bottom leg attached to the base. Its intermediate section runs vertically parallel to the standard and is fixedly secured thereto. Its non-adjustable arm support section extends from the standard at a right angle positioning it parallel to and directly over the base. An eyelet formed adjacent the top of the standard provides structure for detachably securing the finger trap thereto.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Trott 1 Sept. 26, 1972 FRACTURE REDUCING APPLIANCE FOR THE ARM [72] Inventor: Raymond B. Trott, White Oaks,

Hope, RI. 02831 [22] Filed: Feb. 5, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 112,941

[52] US. Cl. ..l28/84 B [51] Int. Cl. ..A61f 5/04 [58] Field of Search ..l28/84 B, 84 R, 83, 92 A, 77

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,783,758 3/1957 Trott ..l28/84 3,390,675 7/ l 968 Giannestras 1 28/84 3,139,884 7/1964 Stryker ..128/83 2,771,876 11/1956 Scholl ..l28/84 Primary Examiner-Richard A. Gaudet Assistant Examiner-J. Yasko Attorney-Barlow and Barlow [5 7] ABSTRACT A fracture reducing appliance having a horizontal base, a vertically oriented standard attached to the base, a unitary brace and arm support member, and an expansible and contractible finger trap. The unitary brace and arm support member has a bottom leg attached to the base. Its intermediate section runs vertically parallel to the standard and is fixedly secured thereto. Its non-adjustable arm support section extends from the standard at a right angle positioning it parallel to and directly over the base. An eyelet formed adjacent the top of the standard provides structure for detachably securing the finger trap thereto.

3 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures PATENTEDserzs I972 3 6 93'. 6 l 7 FIG.2

INVENTOR RAYMOND H. TROTT ATTORNEYS FRACTURE REDUCING APPLIANCE FOR THE ARM BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a mechanical appliance used in setting broken bones in the forearm. It accomplishes reduced fractures in the bones of the wrist by the application of controlled traction and countertraction to the forearm of the human body. More specifically the so-called Colles fracture in the bones of the wrist is counteracted by applying the principle of straight traction and countertraction with ulnar deviation and palmar flexion of the wrist which is essential for proper fixation.

In the past the devices used had been extremely complicated in structure, heavy and cumbersome to transport to patients homes and erect in surgeons offices and hospital operating rooms and inconvenient to apply. Applicants own US. Pat. No. 2,783,758 eliminated many of these drawbacks but still problems persisted. His own horizontal support arms which were adjustable vertically along the height of the standard did not function properly to support the weight of heavier arms when the vertically positioning thumb screws were merely finger tightened. It would then be necessary to tighten the thumb screws with a tool which proved awkward each time a vertical adjustment of one of the arms was required. Another nagging problem was the ability of the thumb screws to frequently become lost during the course of the appliances travel from room to room or from its storage position which made the device inoperable and thus useless. Also the thumb screws created a clothing snagging problem for the doctor or his assistant when they were working along the sides or rear of the former devices.

It is an object of the present invention to provide an appliance comprising a minimum number of parts adapted for economical cost of manufacture with no removable hardware which is capable of being mislaid.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a non.- adjustable appliance structurally designed to properly hold the weight of heavier human arms in which the operator need make no adjustments thereto when used on different patients.

Another object of the invention is to provide a streamlined designed fracture reducing appliance substantially free from any clothing snagging protrusions around the rear and lateral sides of the device.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION vThe present invention now requires a minimum number of pieces to be formed for assembly of the fracture reducing appliance. Essentially these are three in number and they constitute the base, the standard, and

the unitary brace and arm support member. Assembly is both fast and economical with the resulting structure being free from clothing snagging protrusions along the rear or lateral sides of the appliance. The arm support section and the intermediate section running parallel to the standard are formed substantially at right angles to each other and they are an integral part of the unitary brace and arm support member. The resulting structure produces a greatly strengthened support arm capable of supporting the heaviest of arms yet free from any protruding snag areas. Also the lack of moving parts eliminates the possibility of any of the elements becoming deranged.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a side elevation view of the fracture reducing device illustrating a patients forearm supported in a vertical position and applying traction to the bones;

FIG. 2 is a view taken along lines 2-2 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a view taken along lines 3-3 of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The fracture reducing appliance is generally designated by the numeral 10 and can be best described by referring to the drawings. As seen in FIG. 1, a relatively rigid standard 12 is vertically oriented with its lower leg portion 13 bent horizontally and mounted on a flat rectangular base 14 that may be seated on an operating table or other support. The standard may be constructed from flat aluminum or stainless steel bar stock bent to form the lower horizontal leg portion. A unitary brace and arm support member generally designated 16 of the same type of bar stock material is also provided having a lower horizontal leg portion 17, a brace section 18, a vertical intermediate section 19, and an arm support section 20. The legs 13 and 17 can be welded, riveted or otherwise suitably fastened to the top of the base plate 14. Intermediate section 19 can be secured to standard 12 in a like manner.

The arm support section 20 is formed by bending the bar stock horizontally and then immediately giving it a turn about its axis as at 21. At the outer end of the arm support section, an arm rest area 22 is formed in the shape of a channel as best illustrated in FIG. 2.

In using the fracture reducing appliance the patient to be operated upon is placed in a reclining position since it has been determined that the most convenient method of reducing a fracture of the wrist is by sup porting the affected forearm in vertical relationship and applying traction to the hand. This position is illustrated in FIG. 1 with the patients arm being placed in the channel shaped arm rest area 22. Traction is applied to the thumb of the patient by the use of a contractible cot 23 such as the so-called Chinese finger trap. The smaller end of the cot or finger-trap may be held in a clip 25 formed with a hole for connection to an S-shaped hook or clevis 26 adapted to hook into an eyelet 27 formed by a bore adjacent to the upper end of the standard. When the cot or finger-trap 25 is expanded by reducing its length and then applied to the thumb and drawn out to extend its length it will bind tightly around to securely grip the thumb for applying traction thereto. It is to be especially noted by reference to the drawings that by applying relatively straight traction through the finger trap to the thumb of the patient the direction of the force exerted thereby draws the thumb in a direction such that the desired palmar flexion of the wrist and ulnar deviation is secured as the hand assumes the offset or inclined relationship illustrated.

With the parts adjusted in this manner the weight of the arm produces an appreciable amount of traction and additional traction may be applied by placing a small sandbag 30 across the anterior surface of the elbow. With a five-pound sandbag used for this purpose actual measurement has demonstrated that approximately 15 pounds of traction is produced which will hold the wrist satisfactorily in flexion with ulnar deviation. Plaster may be applied while the hand is held by the apparatus to produce immobilization and it has been demonstrated that the whole procedure can be accomplished easily by one person with only or minutes of preparation. The plaster may be applied in slablike layers molded about the wrist and bound by a knitted bandage without interference by the operating parts of the device. Through this simple yet ingenious arrangement of the several members of the device for supporting the forearm in vertical position and applying traction to the thumb, the area of fracture is properly located and the wrist held in immobilization to facilitate reduction of the fracture. The fracture is reduced and maintained until the plaster sets.

It will be observed from the foregoing specification that the present improved apparatus is extremely simple in structure and easy to adjust for performing its required function of applying traction with ulnar deviation and flexion of the wrist most essential for reducing Colles fractures; use being made of the patients own arm to produce most of the traction without pain or undue discomfort to the patient. The present improved device has been applied successfully in many cases without the need for anesthesia or a sedative. As another advantage of the present device, the area of fracture remains available for post-operative examination with X-rays or fluoroscope while the wrist is still immobilized.

What is claimed is:

1. A fracture reducing device comprising a. a horizontal base,

b. a vertically oriented standard attached to said base,

c. a one piece brace and arm support member having a bottom leg attached to said base, a brace section extending upwardly from said leg, an intermediate section running vertically from said brace section parallel to said standard and fixedly secured thereto with the non-adjustable arm support section extending right angularly from said standard positioning it parallel to and directly over said base, said support section being of a width greater than its thickness and twisted about its longitudinal axis through substantially and bent at its end portion into generally channel shape to provide a rest for the arm,

.d. an expansible and contractible finger trap,

e. fastening means for attaching said finger trap to the top of said standard.

2. The fracture reducing device of claim 1 wherein said vertical standard has an eyelet formed in it adjacent its upper end into which one end of said fastening means is detachably secured.

3. The fracture reducing device of claim 1 wherein said vertical standard has a right angularly extending leg at its base, the bottom surface of which is secured to said base and its top surface having the lower leg of the brace secured thereon.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2771876 *May 18, 1954Nov 27, 1956Scholl Mfg Co IncSurgical traction means
US2783758 *Jun 17, 1955Mar 5, 1957Trott Raymond HFracture reducing device for the arm
US3139884 *Nov 6, 1961Jul 7, 1964Stryker CorpOrthopedic device
US3390675 *Jul 26, 1965Jul 2, 1968Nicholas J. GiannestrasLeg tensioning device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4930523 *Apr 13, 1989Jun 5, 1990Lincoln Mills, Inc.Surgical shoulder positioning apparatus
US5074291 *Sep 17, 1990Dec 24, 1991Carter Peter RHand traction surgical table
US5084047 *Mar 26, 1991Jan 28, 1992Naraghi Fred FFracture reducing apparatus
US5451203 *Jul 29, 1994Sep 19, 1995Orthopedic Systems, Inc.Traction mechanism
US6811541May 23, 2002Nov 2, 2004Dennis Michael LambertTraction device
US6916302 *Oct 19, 2001Jul 12, 2005Jon C. GehrkeAppendage elevator system
US7131955Mar 7, 2005Nov 7, 2006Price Geoffrey MOrthopedic traction tower system
US7451509 *Feb 18, 2004Nov 18, 2008Jordan DawesEnhancer device for enhancing the utility of a user's bed
US7771378Nov 6, 2006Aug 10, 2010Acumed Sports Medicine, LlcOrthopedic traction tower system
US8540656Jan 26, 2012Sep 24, 2013Roy Y. PowlanApparatus and method for the treatment of fractures of the distal radius
WO1990011745A1 *Jan 2, 1990Oct 18, 1990Lincoln Mills IncSurgical shoulder positioning apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/40
International ClassificationA61B17/88
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/3761, A61B17/88
European ClassificationA61B17/88, A61F5/37E