Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3694128 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1972
Filing dateMay 6, 1970
Priority dateMay 6, 1970
Publication numberUS 3694128 A, US 3694128A, US-A-3694128, US3694128 A, US3694128A
InventorsFoxen Benjamin F
Original AssigneeFoxen Benjamin F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Block molding apparatus
US 3694128 A
Abstract
The side form panels of a concrete block mold, pivot outwardly to downwardly eject a molded block under the force of a pressure head within an automatic block molding machine. The mold frame while supported on a pallet, is vibrated and the concrete is compacted by the pressure head.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Foxen [54] BLOCK MOLDING APPARATUS [72] Inventor: Benjamin F. Foxen, 1515 Sharon Drive, Carson City, Nev. 89701 [22] Filed: May 6, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 34,996

[52] US. Cl. ..425/412, 249/1 70,- 425/442 [51] Int. Cl. ..B28b 7/04 [58] Field of Search ..25/4l R, 41 E, 41 G, 121 R,

25/DIG. 11; 249/170; 425/412, 442

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,587,413 2/1952 Heyden ..25/41 R X 810,019 l/1906 Apgar ..25/41 R 804,890 11/1905 Shock ..25/41 R 3,277,551 10/1966 Sekiguchi ..25/41 E UX [4 1 Sept. 26, 1972 3,176,369 4/1965 Dennis et a1 ..25/41 E X 770,677 9/1904 Cuatt ..25/121 R X 810,343 1/1906 Pettyjohn ..249/1 70 801,249 10/1905 Keagy ..249/l70 X 812,336 2/1906 Glatfelter ..25/41 R UX Primary Examiner-J. Spencer Overholser Assistant Examiner-Ben D. Tobor Attorney-Clarence A. O'Brien and Harvey B. Jacobson [5 7] ABSTRACT The side form panels of a concrete block mold, pivot outwardly to downwardly eject a molded block under the force of a pressure head within an automatic block molding machine. The mold frame while supported on a pallet, is vibrated and the concrete is compacted by the pressure head.

2 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTED E I91? 3. 694, l 28 SHEET 1 UF 4 Benjamin F Foxen INVESTOR PATENTED 3,694,128

Benjamin f. Foxen INVENTOR.

BLOCK MOLDING APPARATUS This invention relates to the molding of concrete blocks and more particularly to improvements in a block mold assembly associated with an automatic block molding machine.

The molding of concrete blocks in an automatic molding machine, is limited in production rate by the mold assembly which often requires unlocking of the mold frame to permit release of the molded block and removal or replacement of the mold core. This is particularly true in connection with the molding of concrete blocks having a particular facing surface. It is therefore an important object of the present invention to provide an improved type of mold assembly for automatic molding machines by means of which production rate may be substantially increased.

In accordance with the present invention, the mold assembly includes a frame supported by the upper ends of the vibrator rods in an automatic molding machine such as a machine manufactured by Columbia Machine of Vancouver, Wash. known as Columbia Super 12 Hi. The mold frame pivotally supports on its upper edges, side form panels on all sides with power operated means for outwardly displacing the side form panels. Mold cores are fixedly mounted within the mold frame by bars secured to the upper edges of the frame. The power operated means for displacing the side form panels to the open positions are actuated by the control system of the automatic molding machine so as to release molded blocks for ejection downwardly at the proper time during the block molding operation. The mold frame which is open at the top and bottom, is supported on a pallet carried on a vertically movable table associated with the stripper assembly of the machine. With the mold frame resting on the pallet, it is automatically loaded with material by a feeding mechanism after which a pressure head descends into the mold frame to compact the material while the mold frame is vibrated by the vibrating mechanism. When the concrete material has reached a proper consistency, the side panels are displaced outwardly and the pallet table lowered by the stripper assembly in order to permit downward ejection of the molded blocks by the compaction force of the pressure head and gravity. After the molded blocks are withdrawn with the pallet from the machine, another pallet is placed on the table and raised into engagement with the mold frame supported by the vibrator rods. Another operational sequence may then ensue.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a partial front elevational view of a block molding machine with the mold assembly of the present invention installed therein.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the mold assembly.

FIG. 3 is a side sectional view taken substantially through a plane indicated by section line 3-3 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a partial side sectional view taken substantially through a plane indicated by section line 4-4 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing the mold assembly itself.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing disassembled parts of the mold assembly.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a molded concrete block formed in the mold assembly of the present invention.

FIGS. 8 through 11 are schematic views showing various operational phases in the block molding process associated with the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings in detail, FIG. 1 illustrates a typical automatic concrete block molding machine generally denoted by reference numeral 10. The block molding machine includes a head frame portion 12 supported on a base by the columns 14. The head frame portion movably mounts a pressure head 16 adapted to be lowered into a mold assembly 18 for compacting a wet concrete mixture which is automatically loaded into the mold assembly as will be hereafter explained. The mold assembly is supported on a pallet which rests on a pallet table 20 which in turn is carried on the beam support 22 of a stripper assembly by means of which the pallet table 20 may be lowered. Fluid power operating devices 24 mounted by the head frame 12 are accordingly connected to the support beams 22 for this purpose. The vertical stroke of the support beams is controlled by limit switch devices 26 mounted by the head frame 12 and engageable by the switch actuators 28 on the stripper assembly support beams 22. The limit switch devices 26 are connected to an electronic control assembly 30 through which operation of a solenoid valve assembly 32 is controlled for routing of fluid pressure from pump assembly 34 to the fluid operated mechanisms 24 as well as to the other fluid operator mechanisms controlling the mold assembly 18 and the pressure head 16. The automatic molding machine also includes a pair of shaker rods 36 associated with a vibrator mechanism (not shown) for imparting vibration to the mold assembly 18 which is supported by the upper end portions of the shaker rods through holder assemblies 38.

Inasmuch as the present invention resides in the mold assembly apparatus and its use, the foregoing description of the automatic molding machine within which it is utilized should suffice for an understanding of the invention, the details of the molding machine in itself forming no part of the present invention. As more clearly seen in FIGS. 2, 3 and 5, the mold assembly includes a frame generally referred to by reference numeral 40 supported by the frame holders 38 at the upper end portions of the shaker rods 36. The frame includes side brackets 42 secured to the shaker rod holders 38 by fasteners 44 extending through openings 46 in the brackets. The bracket legs 48 associated with the brackets 42 at opposite sides of the frame are secured by fasteners 50 to spacer blocks 52 provided with hinge formations 54 at the upper ends thereof. Secured to the spacer blocks 52 at each end of the frame are the side flanges 55 of a pair of end plates 56 to which hinge formations 58 are formed on the upper flange 78 at right angles to the hinge formations 54. Openings 60 are formed in the end plates 56 and spacer blocks 62 are secured to the side flanges opposite the side flanges 55 to which spacer blocks 52 are connected. Hinge formations 64 are also formed on the upper edges of the spacer blocks 62 parallel to the hinge formations 54. In

the illustrated embodiment, two sets of end plates 56 and spacer blocks 52 and 62 are assembled on each end of the frame with an intermediate spacer block 66 interconnecting the two sets in order to divide the mold assembly into two halves, each half accommodating the molding of a concrete block 68 as shown in'FIG. 7. Thus, a rigid frame 40 is formed which is open at the top and bottom. The bottom of the frame is adapted to be sealed, however, by an underlying pallet 70 as shown in FIG 3.

A pair of core members 72 are positioned within each half of the mold frame by means of an overhead bar 74 to which the upper edges of the core members are secured as by welding. Mounting flanges 76 are secured to the opposite ends of the suspension bars 74 for securing the same to the upper flanges 78 of the end plates 56 by means of fasteners 80. The fasteners 80 also secure mounting. brackets 82 to the upper flange portions 78 of the end plates below the end brackets 76. The mounting brackets 82 extend away from the frame 40 parallel to the corev suspending bars 74 in order to adjustably anchor fluid operated piston devices 84. A pair of such piston devices 84 are thereby supported adjacent to each end of the frame 40. Furthermore, fluid operated piston devices 86 are pivotally anchored by adjustable anchoring means 88 to the frame holders 38 and are operatively connected to the mold assembly as more clearly seen in FIGS. 1 and 3.

Referring now to FIGS. 3, 4, 5, and 6 in particular, the mold assembly includes a pair of side forming panels 90 provided with pivot lugs 92 by means of which the piston devices 86 are connected thereto adjacent the lower edges of the panels. Pivot rods 94 are secured to the upper edges of the panels 90 and are received within the hinge formations 54 on the spacer blocks 52 for pivotally suspending the panels 90 in spaced relation to the end brackets 42 of the frame. The confronting faces 96 of the panels 90 which are spaced from the core members 72, thus produce a surface pattern on the concrete 98 which fills the mold space between the panels and the core members as shown in FIG. 3. The facing surfaces 96 of the panels 90 confront the facing surfaces of intermediate panel members 100 which are also provided at their upper edges with pivot rods 102 received within the hinge formations 64 on the spacer blocks 62. The ends of the pivot rods 94 and 102 which project from the hinge formations 54 and 64, are respectively connected to lever arms 104 and 106 which in turn are interconnected by links 108. Accordingly, pivotal outward displacement imparted to the panel members 90 by the fluid piston devices 86, will cause simultaneous outward pivotal displacement of the panel members 100 on the opposite sides of the core members 72. In this fashion, a molded concrete block may be released from the mold assembly as will be explained hereafter.

As more clearly seen in FIGS. 4 and 6, panel members 110 are also pivotally suspended in spaced relation to the core members 72 adjacent to the end plates 56 in order to confine and surface the ends of the concrete blocks 68 formed within the mold assembly. The upper edges of the panel members 110 are therefore provided with hinge formations 112 interfitted between the hinge formations 58 on the end plates 56 in order to receive the hinge pins 114 as shown in FIG. 4. A pivot lug 116 is secured to the outer sides of the panel members 110 adjacent the lower edges for pivotal connection to the fluid piston devices 84. Thus, the piston rods extending from the fluid piston devices 84 extend through the openings 60 in the end plates 56 for connection to the panel members 110 through the pivot lugs 116. The cylinder portions of the fluid piston devices 84 on the other hand are pivotally anchored to the brackets 82 by the adjustable fastener assemblies 118. Operation of the fluid piston devices 84 is coordinated by the control system of the automatic molding machine with the fluid piston devices 86 so that all of the panel members 90, 100 and 110 will be pivotally displaced simultaneously from the vertical molding positions to the outwardly displaced release positions as shown by dotted line in FIG. 3. Further, the panel members may be positioned at a slight angle to the vertical if desired for molding purposes by appropriate adjustment of the fluid piston devices. Also, as will be explained hereafter, the panel members are displaced to the release position by the fluid piston devices at a proper and critical time in the molding operation in order to effect ejection of the concrete blocks when the cementitious material fed into the mold has reached a proper consistency under the compaction pressure of the pressure head 16 and the vibratory effect of the vibrating mechanism.

Referring now to FIG. 8, the molding machine and mold assembly 18 is schematically shown in an initial operational phase. The mold assembly is shown in a closed position with the bottom thereof sealed by a pallet on the pallet table 20. A predetermined quantity of wet concrete mix received from the hopper 120 may then be delivered by the feed mechanism 122 to the closed mold assembly 18 as shown in FIG. 9 thereby filling up the mold. The mold assembly which is supported by the shaker rods 36, will then be vibrated and the wet concrete mix compacted by lowering of the pressure head 16 into the mold after the feed mechanism 122 has been retracted as shown in FIG. 10. At the proper time in the molding operation, the panel members of the mold assembly are displaced outwardly by the ,fluid operating devices aforementioned as shown in FIG. 11 so that the compaction force of the pressure head 16 and gravity will cause downward ejection of the molded concrete block 66 as the pallet table 20 is lowered. The block carrying pallet 70 may then be displaced onto a delivery conveyor 124 and replaced by a new pallet from the pallet magazine 126. The empty pallet may then be raised once again to the upper position by the pallet table 20 and the mold assembly l8 closed so as to begin a new operational cycle. In view of the foregoing operational procedure and the mold structure, molded concrete blocks are formed at an unexpectedly high production rate.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. ln combination with a molding machine, a mold assembly comprising a frame having a pair of side brackets, a pair of end plates and spacers interconnecting the end plates with the side brackets, a plurality of panels forming a mold enclosure within the frame, first hinge means mounted by the spacers for pivotally suspending a first pair of the panels in spaced relation to the side brackets and the spacers, second hinge means mounted by the end plates for pivotally suspending a second pair of the panels in spaced relation to the end plates between said first pair of panels to form the mold enclosure, a suspension bar mounted on the end plates in straddling relation to said second pair of panels, core members depending from the suspension

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US770677 *Jan 27, 1904Sep 20, 1904 Expanding mold
US801249 *Mar 10, 1904Oct 10, 1905Edward KeagyConcrete-block mold.
US804890 *Apr 29, 1905Nov 21, 1905William A ShockMold for the manufacture of cement brick.
US810019 *Feb 13, 1905Jan 16, 1906Gorman J ApgarCement-block machine.
US810343 *May 29, 1905Jan 16, 1906John Mclaren PettyjohnConcrete-block mold.
US812336 *Aug 23, 1905Feb 13, 1906Emerson C GlatfelterMachine for forming concrete blocks.
US2587413 *Feb 28, 1949Feb 26, 1952Heyden Bernard Aloysius VanderVented core and mold assembly for molding machines
US3176369 *Nov 10, 1961Apr 6, 1965Concrete Engineering And MachiAutomatic molding machine
US3277551 *Oct 7, 1963Oct 11, 1966Sekiguchi Seisakusho KkConcrete block molding machines
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4420296 *Jun 10, 1982Dec 13, 1983Kovan Engineering Pty. Ltd.Closure assembly
US6159401 *Dec 11, 1997Dec 12, 2000Entwicklungsgesellschaft Wolfgang Hoesch GdbrCementitious products
US6539682 *May 11, 1999Apr 1, 2003Interlock Holdings Pty Ltd.Building elements and methods in relation to same
US6979418 *Jun 10, 2003Dec 27, 2005King's Material, Inc.Method to create irregular edge decorative blocks
US7140867 *Jan 4, 2002Nov 28, 2006Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Mold for making a masonry block
US7156645Jul 29, 2003Jan 2, 2007Ness Inventions, Inc.Concrete block mold with moveable liner
US7208112Feb 5, 2003Apr 24, 2007Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Concrete block and method of making same
US7261548Jun 29, 2004Aug 28, 2007Haberman MachineConcrete block mold with moveable liner
US7360970Dec 8, 2005Apr 22, 2008Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Composite masonry block
US7458800Oct 20, 2006Dec 2, 2008Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Mold assembly for manufacturing a masonry block
US7470121Feb 10, 2006Dec 30, 2008Ness Inventions, Inc.Block mold having moveable liner
US7500845Jan 12, 2006Mar 10, 2009Ness Inventions, Inc.Apparatus and method for forming retaining wall blocks with variable depth flanges
US7575700Feb 23, 2006Aug 18, 2009Pampf Molds Industries, Inc.Apparatus and method for a mold alignment system
US7647862Nov 1, 2006Jan 19, 2010Ness Inventions, Inc.Linear actuator
US7695268Apr 19, 2007Apr 13, 2010Marshall ConcreteSystem and method for manufacturing concrete blocks
US7704435Jul 29, 2005Apr 27, 2010Rampf Molds Industries, Inc.Apparatus and method for utilizing a universal plunger
US7780141Jan 9, 2004Aug 24, 2010Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc.Mold box for making first and second wall blocks
US7785097Jun 5, 2009Aug 31, 2010Ness Inventions, Inc.Concrete block mold with moveable liner
US7807083Apr 5, 2007Oct 5, 2010Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Method of making a concrete block
US7819607 *Mar 17, 2006Oct 26, 2010Carreras-Maldonado EfrainPaving block and molding process therefor
US7849656Apr 18, 2008Dec 14, 2010Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Dry cast block arrangement and methods
US7980842 *Jun 5, 2009Jul 19, 2011Ness Inventions, Inc.Concrete block mold with moveable liner and heater
US8075221 *Nov 12, 2009Dec 13, 2011Hortech, Inc.Paver assembly
US8113815 *Jun 7, 2010Feb 14, 2012Ness Inventions, Inc.Block mold having moveable liner
US8123512 *Dec 2, 2009Feb 28, 2012Ness Inventions, Inc.Concrete block mold with moveable liner
US8128851Dec 16, 2009Mar 6, 2012Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Concrete block and method of making same
US8132988Jul 19, 2010Mar 13, 2012Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc.Retaining wall block
US8133337 *Dec 31, 2009Mar 13, 2012Pacific Coast Building Products, Inc.Method for making a concrete block
US8182260Jun 25, 2007May 22, 2012Rampf Molds Industries, Inc.Apparatus and method for forming tapered products
US8186644Jun 5, 2009May 29, 2012Ness Inventions, Inc.Concrete block mold with movable liners with master bar
US8268223Jan 29, 2010Sep 18, 2012Redi-Rock International, LlcForm and process for casting concrete blocks
US8313321Jun 7, 2010Nov 20, 2012Ness Inventions Inc.Mold assembly employing fluid heating
US8430661Jul 18, 2011Apr 30, 2013Ness Inventions, Inc.Concrete block mold with moveable liner
US8524135Nov 20, 2012Sep 3, 2013Ness Inventions, Inc.Mold assembly employing fluid heating
US8540915Jan 27, 2012Sep 24, 2013Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Concrete block and method of making same
US8628320Feb 28, 2012Jan 14, 2014Ness Inventions, Inc.Concrete block mold with moveable liner
US8632718May 15, 2012Jan 21, 2014Rampf Molds Industries, Inc.Method for forming tapered products
US20120175814 *Jan 10, 2011Jul 12, 2012O'neill RaymondMethod of and machine for manufacturing concrete u-wall type construction elements and method of operating the same
EP0004866A1 *Mar 15, 1979Oct 31, 1979Quickblock Holding AGMould for simultaneously manufacturing several hollow concrete blocks
EP0895841A1 *Jul 31, 1998Feb 10, 1999Bisotherm GmbHDevice for making large sizes blocks
EP0947299A1 *Dec 11, 1997Oct 6, 1999Entwicklungsgesellschaft Wolfgang Hoesch GdbRProcess and apparatus for making concrete products with exposed aggregates
EP2559824A1 *Dec 27, 2002Feb 20, 2013Anchor Wall Systems, Inc.Process and mold assembly for forming a masonry concrete block
WO2003060251A1 *Dec 27, 2002Jul 24, 2003Anchor Wall SystMasonry block and method of making same
WO2005011942A2 *Jul 6, 2004Feb 10, 2005Haberman MachineConcrete block mold with moveable liner
WO2006076544A2 *Jan 13, 2006Jul 20, 2006Ness Inv SApparatus and method for forming retaining wall blocks with variable depth flanges
WO2010088599A1 *Feb 1, 2010Aug 5, 2010Redi-Rock International, LlcForm and process for casting concrete blocks
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/412, 425/442, 249/170
International ClassificationB28B7/16, B28B15/00, B28B7/26, B28B7/18, B28B7/10, B28B7/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28B7/10, B28B7/0044, B28B15/005, B28B7/26, B28B7/183, B28B7/007
European ClassificationB28B7/00B3D, B28B15/00B, B28B7/10, B28B7/26, B28B7/18B, B28B7/00F2