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Publication numberUS3694940 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1972
Filing dateOct 20, 1970
Priority dateNov 14, 1969
Also published asDE6944404U
Publication numberUS 3694940 A, US 3694940A, US-A-3694940, US3694940 A, US3694940A
InventorsStohr Rudolf
Original AssigneeRieker & Co Dr Justus
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inner shoe for footwear
US 3694940 A
Abstract
An inner shoe comprising a non-woven structure based on paper for fitting within footwear such as a ski boot to absorb perspiration. The inner shoe can be formed of one piece only by folding and joining the edges of the folded portions, or from two molded half-shells.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [151 3,694,940

Stohr 51 Oct. 3, 1972 [54] INNER SHOE FOR FOOTWEAR 5 References Cited [72] Inventor: Rudolf Stohr, Tuttlingenlwurttemberg, Germany UNITED STATES PATENTS 73 Assignee: Dr. Justus Rieker & 00., Tuttfgggi 3413;: 9*? 293i lingenlwumemberg Germany nms 2,642,678 6/1953 Fula ..36/1O X [22] Filed: Oct. 20, 1970 3,000,118 9/1961 O'Shea ..36/l0 l f 1 pp No: 82,306 3,530,596 9/ 970 Kou mann 36/2 5 AL Primary Examiner-Patrick D. Lawson [30] Foreign Application P i i D Att0meyMason, Fenwick 84 Lawrence Nov. 1S, 1969 Germany ..G 69 44 404.8 57 ABSTRACT An inner shoe comprising a non-woven structure il. ..36/10, based on p p for i g within footwear such as a ski [58] Field of Search ..36/2.5 R, 2.5 AL, 9 A, 10 absmb pe'spmtm' can be fonned of one piece only by folding and joining the edges of the folded portions, or from two molded halfshells.

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ATTDQ N ELYS INNER SHOE FOR FOOTWEAR The present invention relates to an inner shoe for footwear.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The expression boots" is generally understood to mean weatherproof footwear which is required to prevent, in particular, penetration by moisture. In order to protect the foot of a wearer of a boot of this kind against the cold, it is already known to use inner shoes" made from knitted and partly lined textile materials. It is true that such inner shoes" can, like stockings, be washed, and therefore used again and again, but they are relatively costly and, if they are to be changed frequently, they involve considerable purchasing expenses. In this connection, it must be remembered that the foot is subjected, in such weatherproof boots, which are not very air-permeable, and can even be completely impermeable, in particular in the case of rubber and plastics boots, to increased perspiration, so that the inner shoe requires in many cases, even after being worn only once, to be changed and washed.

This applies particularly to sports boots, such as ski boots, which are often continuously in use throughout a holiday. For these purposes, it is necessary that several pairs of textile inner shoes should be available and that they should be frequently washed. That is, however, inconvenient, and in many cases it is only possible to a limited extent. 1

As a result of perspiration absorption, textile inner shoes should be regarded as personal underclothing, and, for hygienic reasons, are unsuitable for commercial hiring. However, hiring of clothing is a commercial activity which at the present day frequently extends to ski boots.

With the invention, it is intended to provide a thermally insulating inner shoe which has a special capacity for the absorption of moisture and is capable of being manufactured so inexpensively that it may be thrown away, in the manner of a disposable article, after soiling or after being used on one occasion only. According to the invention, this is achieved by manufacturing the inner shoe from a non-woven material based on paper.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the present invention is to provide an inner shoe for footwear, said inner shoe comprising a structure made from a non-woven material based on paper.

Non-woven materials based on paper have the properties of good thermal insulation and moisture absorption capacity. They are inexpensive and may be manufactured so as to have a degree of strength adequate to withstand the stressing to which an inner shoe is normally subjected in use.

A pasty basic mass for producing a non-woven paper structure is itself capable of being pressed-out in suitable molds, so that an inner shoe may be manufactured by assembling two pre-shaped half shells." Preferably, however, the inner shoe is manufactured from nonwoven elements cut or punched from larger webs of non-woven material. Depending on the cut and/or ability to undergo curvature of the non-woven structure, the inner shoe may be assembled from one or more such non-woven structural elements. The nonwoven structural element or elements is or are assembled in the shape of the inner shoe, the seams preferably being adhesively secured together. In order to compact the non-woven materials, to prevent the penetration of moisture and/or merely to achieve less expensive and simpler assembly at the seams, the fibers of the non-woven structure may be coated with a plastics coating on the outwardly facing upper surface, such a plastics coating permitting the plastics welding of the elements of the non-woven structure at the seams. The plastics coating may be produced by the spraying on of a plastics dispersion or solution.

The inner shoe may consist for example of a onepiece non-woven paper structure designed to be continuous (seamless) in the bottom zone of the shoe and joined together by means of two seams, one of which extends from the toe, via the instep, as far as the opening for insertion of the foot of the wearer, whereas the other extends along the rear apex line of the shoe. The non-woven paper structure may, however, also be designed to be continuous in the zone of the Achilles tendon of the wearer, and joined together in the bottom, toe and instep zones. When the shoe is manufactured from two separate non-woven structural elements, the latter preferably have the same shape and are joined together along a seam extending in the longitudinal direction of the shoe.

Depending on the thickness of the material of the non-woven structure, it may be expedient to reinforce the inner shoe in its bottom zone by designing the element or elements of the non-woven structure requiring to be joined together in this zone to overlap there.

The non-woven paper structures used may themselves have the ability to undergo curvature, or a resilience such that the inner shoe (within a specific size range) adapts itself to the shape of the foot of the user. In order to facilitate introduction of the foot into the shoe having regard to the capacity for curvature of the non-woven paper structure used, it may be expedient to provide the shoe, preferably in the instep zone, with a slot extending from the shoe opening, those portions of the shoe upper which constitute the slot edging preferably being designed to overlap over the slot in use of the shoe.

Owing to the inexpensive starting material and simple manner of manufacture, the inner shoe according to the invention, which may be manufactured as a mass-produced article, can without difficulty be produced so inexpensively that, from the economic viewpoint, even if it is used only once it readily holds its own with the known inner shoes made from knitted textile materials. Indeed, it is very much more convenient to handle, owing to the elimination of washing and drying, as is so in the case of any disposable article.

By the use of the inexpensive inner shoe according to the invention, the commercial lending of ski boots may be given a considerable stimulus, since it becomes possible to offer for hire a boot which is entirely satisfactory from the viewpoint of hygiene and which has not contact with the foot perspiration of user.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS Two embodiments of the invention are described in greater detail in the following description with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the one embodiment of inner shoe according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic longitudinal section through a ski boot having inserted therein an inner shoe according to FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the both parts which compose the other embodiment of the inner shoe according to the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The inner shoe shown in FIG. 1 is manufactured from a one-piece non-woven paper structure 1 designed to be continuous in the zone of the Achilles tendon of a wearer, and having two edges joined together by an adhesively connected seam 2 in the bottom, heel and instep zones. The foot introduction opening 3 in the ankle zone may be widened by leaving unattached a portion of the seam 2 extending in the zone of the instep.

The longitudinal section through a ski boot shown in FIG. 2 does not show any kind of padding or the like. Vulcanized-on to the upper 4 of the ski boot is a sole 5 on the side of which facing the interior of the shoe there is arranged an insole 6. Inserted in the interior of the ski boot is the inner shoe 1 according to FIG. 1 (also shown in section). The seams 2 are omitted from FIG. 2, for clarity.

The inner shoe" according to the invention can also be manufactured from two pieces of non-woven paper structure. These pieces 1', which are shown in FIG. 3, are, for instance, dish-like shaped (e.g. by pressing of the paper structure) and joined together by an adhesively seam extending near the longitudinal central plane of the inner shoe and the edges 2' of the both pieces.

I claim:

1. A single usage type inexpensive inner shoe for footwear, said inner shoe comprising a structure made from a single ply of non-woven paper base material.

2. An inner shoe as specified in claim 1, wherein said structure is of one piece unitary construction and includes at least one joining seam joining two engaging edges of said structure.

3. An inner shoe as specified in claim 1, wherein said structure further comprises two individual non-woven structural elements and at least one joining seam attaching said elements together.

4. An inner shoe as specified in claim 1, wherein said structure further includes at least one joining seam comprising juxtaposed edges of said structure and adhesive means securing said edges to each other.

5. An inner shoe as specified in claim 1, wherein said structure further includes a plastic coating on the outwardly facing upper surface thereof.

6. An inner shoe as specified in claim 5, wherein said structure further includes at least one joining seam comprising juxtaposed edges of said structure and a plastic weld securing said edges to each other.

7. An inner shoe as specified in claim 1, wherein said structure further includes at least one joining seam extending substantially in the longitudinal direction of the shoe.

8. An inner shoe as specified in claim 1, wherein said structure further comprises bottom edges thereof in hi all 0 erla in relat' n.

il An inr ier sl ige a s speci led in claim 1, wherein said structure includes an instep zone having an opening in the top thereof for insertion of a wearers foot, and a cut away portion extending from said opening, facilitating entry of said foot into said structure.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1980621 *Apr 26, 1934Nov 13, 1934Innis Robert ISanitary sandal
US2642678 *Mar 5, 1951Jun 23, 1953Fula Esther AOvershoe liner
US2714771 *May 16, 1951Aug 9, 1955Ruth G OlfeneMulti-ply paper foot covering
US3000118 *Mar 11, 1960Sep 19, 1961O'shea Anne WFoot covering
US3530596 *Mar 12, 1969Sep 29, 1970Raichle Boot Co LtdSki boot
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3807062 *Mar 5, 1973Apr 30, 1974Karku Sport AbAthletic boot
US3945134 *Sep 13, 1974Mar 23, 1976Alpine Research, Inc.Ski boot
US4194308 *May 18, 1978Mar 25, 1980L-Lt-ProdukterBoot blank
US4204345 *Dec 1, 1977May 27, 1980Bradley Virginia RSock
US4708272 *May 5, 1986Nov 24, 1987Guerra Romeo EApparatus and method for inserting a foot into a boot
US4845862 *Mar 11, 1987Jul 11, 1989Burlington Industries, Inc.Cold weather footwear
US5408761 *Jul 29, 1993Apr 25, 1995A. D. One Sports, Inc.Sport shoe and support system
US5542191 *Oct 25, 1995Aug 6, 1996Shouse Financial CorporationFootwear drying insert
US5669160 *May 28, 1996Sep 23, 1997Noridica S.P.A.Innerboot particularly for skates
US5673448 *Nov 4, 1993Oct 7, 1997Intuition Sports IncorporatedSport boot liner and method for making same
US5732483 *Jul 12, 1996Mar 31, 1998Skis Rossignol S.A.Shoe for the practice of snowboarding
US6260288Jun 17, 1999Jul 17, 2001Salomon S.A.Boot having structure for draining and evacuating moisture
US6367166Jun 18, 2001Apr 9, 2002Salomon S.A.Boot having structure for draining and evacuating moisture
US6438868 *Jun 21, 2000Aug 27, 2002A. Testoni S.P.A.Method for making shoes and the shoes obtained using said method
US7347011 *Mar 3, 2004Mar 25, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US7814598Feb 18, 2008Oct 19, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US8042288Sep 10, 2010Oct 25, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US8266749Sep 20, 2011Sep 18, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a textile upper
US8448474Feb 20, 2012May 28, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component with a tongue
US8490299Dec 18, 2008Jul 23, 2013Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having an upper incorporating a knitted component
US8522577Mar 15, 2011Sep 3, 2013Nike, Inc.Combination feeder for a knitting machine
US8595878Aug 2, 2010Dec 3, 2013Nike, Inc.Method of lasting an article of footwear
US8621891May 17, 2012Jan 7, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear incorporating a knitted component with a tongue
US8701232Sep 5, 2013Apr 22, 2014Nike, Inc.Method of forming an article of footwear incorporating a trimmed knitted upper
WO1997015796A1 *Oct 18, 1996May 1, 1997Shouse Financial CorpFootwear drying insert
WO1997037624A1 *Apr 4, 1997Oct 16, 1997Game Int SaSock for sweaty feet
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/10, 36/88, 36/136, 36/98
International ClassificationA43B19/00, A43B7/00, A43B7/34
Cooperative ClassificationA43B19/00, A43B7/34
European ClassificationA43B19/00, A43B7/34