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Publication numberUS3696460 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1972
Filing dateDec 15, 1969
Priority dateDec 15, 1969
Also published asCA919365A, CA919365A1
Publication numberUS 3696460 A, US 3696460A, US-A-3696460, US3696460 A, US3696460A
InventorsMoss Theron V
Original AssigneeMoss Theron V
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mop swab and method of manufacture
US 3696460 A
Abstract
In one form, a tape is secured to one or both sides of the mop cords intermediate their ends, after which the tape with cords attached thereto may be folded in a prescribed manner and restitched through the entire bundle of cords to provide a relatively stiff headband for the mop swab. In another form, the mop cords are first bunched together intermediate their ends and then the tape is wrapped completely around the bundle of cords and stitched thereto using plural rows of stitching extending transversely across the width of the tape and also longitudinally along the sides of the tape which longitudinal rows lock the threads in the transverse rows to keep them from coming out at the sides.
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United States Patent Moss MOP SWAB AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE [72] Inventor: Theron V. Moss, 3175 Falmouth,

Shaker Heights, Ohio 44120 [22] Filed: Dec. 15, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 885,022

[52] US. Cl ..15/229 R, 112/412, 300/21 [51] Int. Cl. ..A47I 13/20 [58] FieldofSeareh.l5/l47 R, 147 A, 147 B, 147C, 15/226, 228, 229 R, 229 A, 229 AC, 229 B,

[451 Oct. 10, 1972 3,246,356 4/ 1966 Sorrells ..15/229 A X 1,774,209 8/1930 Nelson ..15/229 8 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 20123/34 11/1934 Australia 1 5/229 AC Primary ExaminerDaniel Blum AttorneyOberlin, Maky, Donnelly & Renner ABSTRACT In one form, a tape is secured to one or both sides of the mop cords intermediate their ends, after which the tape with cords attached thereto may be folded in a prescribed manner and restitched through the entire bundle of cords to provide a relatively stifi' headband for the mop swab. In another form, the mop cords are first bunched together intermediate their ends and then the tape is wrapped completely around the bundie of cords and stitched thereto using plural rows of stitching extending transversely across the width of the tape and also longitudinally along the sides of the tape which longitudinal rows lock the threads in the transverse rows to keep them from coming out at the sides.

16 Claim, 16 Drawing Figures PKTENTEDBBI 10 I922 SHEU 1 BF 2 INVENTOR THRON V. M055 ATTORNEYS PKTENTEDUBT 10 I972 SHEET 2 OF 2 INVENTOR THERON ll. M055 5 B i a d7 ,5 ATTORNEYS MOP SWAB AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates generally as indicated to a novel mop swab and method of manufacture by which the headband is made relatively flat and stiff usingrelatively light weight tape and the mop cords are securely held in place by the headband.

In the manufacture of mop swabs and particularly wet mops, it is the usual practice to secure the mop cords or yarns together in folded or bunched relation intermediate their ends using a band of textile fabric or other suitable material. To obtain the desired stiffness in the headband and keep the ends of the headband from drooping, the headband is ordinarily wrapped completely around the bunched cords and secured to the cords by stitching entirely through the bundle of cords using lock or chain stitching to resist pull-out of the individual cords. Similar results may be obtained using a heavier tape stitched to one side only of the bunched cords, but the heavier tape is more costly and more difficult to stitch through, and the resulting headband has unfinished edges. In either case, the problem of the stitching pulling out at the sides thus permitting the cords to be pulled from the headband is significant.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION With the foregoing in mind, it is a principal object of this invention to provide a mop swab including a headband that is relatively stiff and securely holds the cords against pull-out thus affording a relatively long life.

Another object is to provide such a mop swab which is relatively simple in construction and easy to manufacture.

Still another object is to provide such a mop swab and method of manufacture utilizing a relatively light weight tape for the headband. The mop swab is of rugged construction and the headband has finished edges. In one form of the invention, the tape is secured to one side only of the mop cords intermediate their ends with the cords spread out, after which the tape with cords attached thereto is folded in a prescribed manner and restitched through the entire bundle of cords to provide a headband of the required stiffness which firmly holds the cords in place. In another form of the invention, tape is secured to both sides of the mop cords, and the tape is folded and restitched or left as is depending on the desired number of layers of mop cords and required stiffness of the headband.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the invention, then, comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description and the annexed drawings setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principle of the invention may be employed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS In the annexed drawings:

FIG. I is a schematic isometric view showing a method by which the mop cords may be wrapped and a tape stitched thereto intermediate the ends thereof as a preliminary step in the manufacture ofa preferred form of mop swab in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary longitudinal section view through the schematic diagram of FIG. I, taken on the plane of the line 2-2 thereof;

FIGS. 3 and 4 are schematic isometric views illustrating one way in which the tape with cords stitched thereto may be folded and restitched to complete the headband;

FIG. 5 is a transverse section through the headband of FIG. 4 taken on the plane of the line 5-5 thereof;

FIGS. 6 through 9 are transverse sections similar to FIG. 5 but showing various other ways in which the headband may be folded and restitched;

FIG. 10 is a schematic isometric view similar to FIG. 1, but the mop cords are shown wrapped in bundles with a slight spacing between bundles, and a continuous tape stitched to one or both sides of the bundles intermediate the ends thereof;

FIG. 11 is a transverse section through the headband of a mop swab made by folding one of the bundles of cords made in accordance with FIG. [0 having a tape stitched to one side of the bundle of cords;

FIG. I2 is a schematic isometric view of another form of mop swab comprising one of the bundles of cords of FIG. 10 having tapes stitched to opposite sides of the bundle of cords intermediate the ends thereof;

FIG. 13 is a transverse section through the headband of the mop swab of FIG. 12, taken on the plane of the line l3 l3 thereof;

FIG. I4 is a transverse section through another form of mop swab which is generally similar to that shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, except that the ends of the two tapes have been folded to the middle of the bundle to provide a stiffer headband consisting of four layers of tape;

FIG. 15 is a fragmentary isometric view of still another form of mop swab; and

FIG. 16 is an isometric view showing a mop swab in accordance with this invention secured to a suitable holder.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS Referring now in detail to the drawings and first especially to FIGS. 1 and 2 thereof, one or more continuous mop cords l of suitable type are shown being wrapped in spiral fashion around the outer runs 2 of a pair of parallel endless conveyor chains 3 and 4 driven so that the outer runs 2 move in the same direction to advance the spiral wrap by the conveyor chains. The amount of spacing between each wrap 5 is dependent on the rate at which the conveyor chains are moving and the rate at which the cords are wrapped about the conveyor chains. The adjacent wraps 5 are shown disposed closely adjacent each other, but it will be apparent that a greater spacing may be provided therebetween if desired. Similarly, more than one layer of cords may be wrapped about the conveyors at the same time depending upon the desired density of mop cords. Spools 6 of cord material feed the material through guides 7 carried by a turntable 9 mounted for rotation about the conveyor chains 3 and 4 for wrapping the cord material about the conveyor chains 3 and 4 as they are driven.

Adjacent the forward end of the conveyor chains 3 and 4 there is provided a sewing head 10 for stitching a continuous length of tape II to one side of the spiral wrap longitudinally of the wrap and intermediate the ends of the loops [2 which are formed along opposite sides of the conveyor chains. Whether the cords are of a single layer thickness as shown or of plural layer thicknesses where the cords are stitched to the tape 11 will of course vary depending on the spacing between each wrap and the number of wraps, but in the FIG. 1 embodiment it is preferred that there is initially only one layer of cords along the tape 11 to provide maximum initial spread of the cords for a purpose to be subsequently explained.

The resulting assembly 13 of spiral wrapped cords 1 may be continuously wound on a spool for storage and later use or the spiral wrap may be directly advanced to another station where the tape 11 and cords stitched thereto are severed at specified intervals along the length of the assembly to permit the tape with cords secured thereto to be folded at spaced intervals along the length of the tape in any one of a variety of ways and restitched to form a relatively stiff headband as set forth hereafter. Thus, for example, in FIG. there is shown a headband 15 which is formed by first folding one end 16 of the cut tape 11 inwardly approximately two-thirds of the length of the tape as shown in FIG. 3 and then the other end 19 back over the top of the first folded end 16 as shown in FIG. 4 to provide three layers 20, 21 and 22 of tape with cords attached thereto overlying each other. The layers are subsequently stitched together using a suitable lock or chain stitching 18 passing entirely through the bundle of cords, and the first folded end 16 of tape may also be stitched to the underlying layer of tape prior to folding the other end 19 over, as desired.

ln FIG. 6, there is shown a slightly modified form of headband 23 in which the tape 11 is folded from op posite ends to the middle and restitched to provide two layers 24 and 25 of tape with cords attached thereto; in FIG. 8, the tape is folded from one end all the way across the length of the tape and restitched to provide a headband 26 consisting of two such layers 27 and 28; in FIG. 7 the tape is first folded all the way across as in FIG. 8 and then folded all the way back and restitched, to provide a headband 29 consisting of four such layers 30-33; in HO. 9 the tape is first folded from opposite ends to the middle as in FIG. 6 and then refolded all the way across to provide a headband consisting of four layers of tape, with or without restitching prior to folding back. The greater the number of layers of tape with cords attached thereto, the more stiff and stable the headband becomes. However, with increased layers, the density of mop cords also increases, which reduces the spread of the mop and much be taken into consideration in determining how many layers should be provided.

Such folding of the tape as described to make the headband also has the advantage that it provides a substantially finished edge along the sides ofthe headband, and the restitching of the tape after folding also more firmly secures the cords to the headband and minimizes the chances ofthe threads coming out. There is also the advantage that the headband will be relatively stiffeven when relatively light weight tape material is used because ofthe manner in which the tape is folded over on itselfand restitched as previously described.

FIG. 10 shows a method of making a spiral wrap of cords by winding one or more continuous mop cords 1 in spiral fashion around the outer runs 2 of a pair of moving parallel endless conveyor chains 3 and 4, similar to FIGS. 1 and 2. However, instead of making the wrap continuous throughout its length, the wrapping operation is intermittently interrupted at suitable spaced apart intervals during continuous movement of the conveyor chains to provide a plurality of bundles 35 of wrapped cords having a slight spacing 36 between bundles. Accordingly, when the continuous length of tape 11 is longitudinally stitched to one side of the wrap intermediate the ends of the loops 12 and subsequently severed between adjacent bundles, the severed ends 37 of the tape will extend beyond each bundle of cords. This provides sufficient tape at the ends to cover any cords which might otherwise be left exposed when the tape is folded to form a headband, as by first folding one end inwardly to the middle of the length of the tape and then the other end back over the top of the first folded end to provide a headband 40 such as illustrated in FIG. 11.

A second continuous length of tape 41 may also be stitched to the opposite side of the bundles 35 of cords directly opposite the first tape 11 during the wrapping operation as further shown in FIG. 10. Accordingly, when the tapes are subsequently severed between bundles, the severed ends 37 and 43 of the tapes 11 and 4| will extend beyond the bundle of cords where they are stitched together to provide a headband 44 having finished edges as shown in FIGS. 12 and 13 without having to fold the tapes. However, it may still be desirable to fold the headband 44 of P108. 12 and 13, depending upon the degree of stiffness of the headband and density of the cords desired. Of course, the density of cords may also be controlled during wrapping of the cords 1 around the conveyor chains 3 and 4 as previously described.

In FIG. 14 there is shown a headband 45 which has been formed by folding the ends of a pair of tapes ll and 41 secured to opposite sides of a bundle 35 of cords toward the middle to provide four layers of tape. Of course, it will be understood that the tapes 11 and 41 may also be folded in various other ways, as for example, in the manner shown in FIGS. 6 through 9. After folding, the multiple layers of tapes are stitched together by stitching 46 passing entirely through the folded bundle of cords and tapes as previously described.

In FIG. 15 there is shown yet another form of mop swab 50 in which the tape 51 for the headband 52, rather than being stitched to the cords as shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and I0 prior to folding, is wrapped around the cords after the cords have been folded or bunched together intermediate the ends of the swab. When thus wrapped, there are no unfinished edges on the headband, and the cords are secured against pull-out by a plurality of transverse rows 53 of stitching extending entirely through the bundle of cords across the entire width of the swab, and by a plurality of longitudinal rows 54 of stitching adjacent opposite sides of the headband 52 which lock the threads in the transverse rows 53 in place and keep them from being pulled out at the sides. Such longitudinal rows 54 of stitching also cause the headband to flatten out and stiffen the ends of the headband to prevent them from drooping, whereby a light weight tape may also be used for the headband of the FIG. embodiment. A tailband 55 may also be secured to each end 56 of the mop swab 50 of H0. 15 adjacent the ends of the loops 57 for maintaining the loops in a controlled pattern as disclosed, for example, in U. 8. Pat. No. 3,324,497, or the loops may be left free, as desired, and the loops may also be cut.

From the foregoing, it can now be seen that the various forms of mop swabs disclosed herein permit the use of relatively light weight tape for the headband without sacrificing stiffness in the headband or having to contend with unfinished edges. The mop cords are also securely stitched to the headband, and the stitching will not readily pull out. Upon completion of the mop swabs, they may be attached to a handle 58 by a suitable clamping means 59 as shown in FIG. 16 to provide a mop assembly.

I, therefore, particularly point out and distinctly claim as my invention:

1. A mop swab comprising a plurality of mop cords having a tape of predetermined length secured to one side thereof, said tape with mop cords secured thereto being folded at spaced intervals along the length of said tape first from one end approximately two-thirds of the length of the tape and then from the other end inwardly over the first folded end to provide a headband consisting of three layers of said tape with cords secured thereto, said layers being secured together by stitching passing completely through said layers across the width of said headband.

2. A mop swab comprising a plurality of mop cords having a tape of predetermined length secured to one side thereof, said plurality of mop cords comprising a continuous wrap of cords to which said tape is secured longitudinally of the length of said wrap, said tape with mop cords secured thereto being folded at spaced intervals along the length of said tape to provide a headband consisting of a plurality of layers of said tape with cords secured thereto, said layers being secured together by stitching passing completely through said layers across the width of said headband.

3. A mop swab comprising a plurality of mop cords having a tape of predetermined length secured to one side thereof, said tape with mop cords secured thereto being folded at spaced intervals along the length of said tape to provide a headband consisting of a plurality of layers of said tape with cords secured thereto, the ends of the tape extending beyond the mop cords secured thereto to provide additional tape material at the sides of the folded tape which cover the exposed cords after folding, said layers being secured together by stitching passing completely through said layers across the width of said headband.

4. A method of manufacturing a mop swab comprising the steps of folding a tape of predetermined length having mop cords secured to one side thereof at spaced intervals along the length of the tape, such tape first being folded from one end inwardly approximately two-thirds of the length of the tape and then folded from the other end inwardly over the first folded end to provide a headband comprising three layers of tape with cords secured thereto, and stitching such plurality of layers together across the width of such headband.

5. A method of manufacturing a mop swab comprising the steps of folding a tape of predetermined length having mop cords secured to one side thereof at spaced intervals along the length of the tape to provide a headband comprising a plurality of layers of tape with cords secured thereto, and stitching such plurality of layers together across the width of the headband, such tape with plural mop cords secured to one side thereof being formed by providing a continuous wrap of cords, stitching the tape to one side of the continuous wrap of cords, and cutting the tape with cords attached thereto into the desired length prior to folding.

6. A mop swab comprising a plurality of mop cords having a tape of predetermined length secured to one side thereof, said tape with mop cords secured thereto being folded at spaced intervals along the length of said tape to provide a headband consisting of a plurality of layers of said tape with cords secured thereto, said tape with cords secured thereto being folded from opposite ends to the middle to provide two said layers and refolded all the way across to provide four said layers, said layers being secured together by stitching passing completely through said layers across the width of said headband.

7. A mop swab comprising a plurality of mop cords having a tape of predetermined length secured to one side thereof, a second tape secured to the other side of said mop cords, the ends of said tapes extending beyond said mop cords in alignment with each other, said tape ends being secured together beyond said mop cords, said tapes with mop cords secured thereto being folded at spaced intervals along the length of said tapes to provide a headband consisting of a plurality of layers of said tapes with cords secured thereto, said layers being secured together by stitching passing completely through said layers across the width of said headband.

8. The mop swab of claim 2 further comprising a second tape secured to the other side of said mop cords.

9. The mop swab of claim 2 wherein said tape with cords secured thereto is folded from opposite ends to the middle to provide two said layers.

10. The mop swab of claim 2 wherein said tape with cords secured thereto is folded from one end all the way across the length of the tape to provide two said layers.

11. The mop swab of claim 10 wherein said tape with cords secured thereto is refolded all the way back to provide four said layers.

12. The method of claim 5 wherein such tape with plural cords secured thereto is folded to provide at least three such layers, and the first two layers are stitched together prior to folding the tape into the third layer.

13. The method of claim 5 wherein such tape is folded from opposite ends to the middle to provide two such layers.

14. The method of claim 13 wherein such tape is subsequently refolded all the way across to provide four such layers.

15. The method of claim 5 wherein such tape is folded from one end all the way across the length of the tape to provide two such layers.

16. The method of claim 15 wherein such tape is subsequently folded all the way back to the other end to provide four such layers.

# i i k mrarr

Patent Citations
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US1774209 *Jun 26, 1928Aug 26, 1930Caleb LoringFloor mop
US1940543 *Mar 25, 1933Dec 19, 1933Harry HertzbergPolishing mop
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4085476 *Aug 5, 1975Apr 25, 1978South Eastern Cordage CompanyMop constructions and method of making same
US4908089 *May 20, 1988Mar 13, 1990Toyo Eizai Kabushiki KaishaApparatus for making an elasticized unit
US5221124 *Sep 13, 1991Jun 22, 1993Milliken Research CorporationMethod to manufacture a wet mop head
US5884355 *Dec 19, 1996Mar 23, 1999Micronova Manufacturing, Inc.Mop element for use in clean room mop
US5893613 *Apr 14, 1997Apr 13, 1999Moore; Terry D.Method of making a dust mop
US5996164 *Sep 30, 1997Dec 7, 1999Demetriades; Peter G.Liquid polish applicator and method of making same
US6023809 *Sep 24, 1996Feb 15, 2000Etc Of Henderson, Inc.Liquid polish applicator and method of making same
US8341797 *Oct 11, 2006Jan 1, 2013Ronald Alexander YoungMop swab holder
US20090151100 *Oct 11, 2006Jun 18, 2009Ronald Alexander YoungSwab
EP1314391A1 *Jan 18, 2002May 28, 2003Ronald Alexander YoungFanfold mop heads
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/229.1, 112/412, 28/101, 300/21
International ClassificationA47L13/20
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/20
European ClassificationA47L13/20
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 14, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: SECO INDUSTRIES, INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:SOUTH EASTERN CORDAGE CO.;REEL/FRAME:003915/0662
Effective date: 19810424
Owner name: SECO INDUSTRIES, INC., STATELESS