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Publication numberUS3697008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1972
Filing dateDec 29, 1969
Priority dateDec 29, 1969
Also published asCA934727A, CA934727A1, DE2064325A1, DE2064325B2
Publication numberUS 3697008 A, US 3697008A, US-A-3697008, US3697008 A, US3697008A
InventorsRoy E Smith
Original AssigneeOwens Corning Fiberglass Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for packaging linear material
US 3697008 A
Abstract
Apparatus for and method of packaging linear material such as a glass strand by advancing the linear material to a collector and reciprocating the advancing linear material across a zone while reciprocating the zone with increasing and decreasing stroke lengths.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Smith 1 Oct. 10,1972

[541 APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING LINEAR MATERIAL [72] Inventor: Roy E. Smith, Toledo, Ohio [73] Assignee: Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation [22] Filed: Dec. 29, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 888,706

[52] US. Cl ..242/43, 242/18 G, 242/43.1, 242/158.2, 242/158.4 R [51] Int. Cl. ..B65h 54/32 [58] Field of Search...242/43, 43.1, 18 G, 26.1, 26.2, 242/26.3, 26.4, 27, 158, 158.2, 158.4

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,773,391 12/1956 Bruestle ..242/158.4 R X 3,218,004 1 1/1965 Meeske et al ..242/158.2 2,285,439 6/1942 Jones ..242/43 2,575,031 11/1951 Smith ..242/26.1 2,749,055 6/ 1 956 Bauer ..242/26.2

2,764,363 9/1956 Stammwitz ..242/ 158.4 X 3,109,602 11/1963 Smith ..242/18 G 3,169,714 2/ 1965 Schippers ..242/18 G 3,188,013 6/1965 Geen ..242/43.1 3,334,828 8/1967 Harrison ..242/26.1 3,461,747 8/1969 Simonson et a1 ..242/26.3 X 3,497,148 2/1970 Heumann ..242/43 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 523,054 4/1921 France ..242/l58.4 R

237,695 9/1945 Switzerland ..242/15 8.2 1,055,646 l/ 1967 Great Britain ..242/43 Primary Examiner-Stanley N. Gilreath Attorney-Staelin and Overman and R. C. Hudgens [57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for and method of packaging linear material such as a glass strand by advancing the linear material to a collector and reciprocating the advancing linear material across a zone while reciprocating the zone with increasing and decreasing stroke lengths.

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PATENTEDHBI 10 1972 SHEET t 0F 5 INVENTOR. For 5/W/7'H WYQ vm .TE? .7 02 For 15 5m 7H SHEET 5 0F 5 PATENTEDHBT 10 1972 hilt/1 ffia TI APPARATUS FOR PACKAGING LINEAR MATERIAL BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION ofien In certain operations of packaging linear material such as the packaging of a bundle of continuous glass filaments in a continuous glass filament forming operation, it is customary to collect the bundle of continuous glass filaments or glass strand by a winder accumulating the strand as a package on a tubular collector mounted on a collet or spindle driven at high rotational speeds. Because a strand does not have twist, it does not possess the integrity of yarn. Consequently, a winder normally collects a wound strand package with the strands disposed in helics that cross each other. If a winder collects a strand into a wound package with successive strand turns in adjacent side-by-side relationship and extending substantially transverse of its package, the adjacent turns tend to become intertangled. The intertangled strand portions give rise to strand breaks upon unwinding the package.

The tapered ends of a wound strand package are usually the iones where a strand becomes intertangled. A winder packaging strand normally traverses the strand lengthwise of a rotating collector both to dispose the strands in helics in the building package and to build the package with tapered end portions. As a winders strand traversing apparatus changes direction at the end of each of its strand traversing strokes, the traversing apparatus slows down and instantaneously stops prior to moving in the opposite direction. Because the rotating collector continues to advance the strand at a substantially steady speed, the slow-down of the strand traversing apparatus at the ends of its strokes results in a wound package having strand portions or turns at the ends of each package being wrapped substantially parallel to each other or in side-by-side relationship and being disposed substantially transverse to the package- As the package builds on the winder, the strand turns at the tapered ends tend to move and at times tend to intertangle. This undesirable package end pattern inherent in winding provides the zones where the strand most ofter traps itself and this trapping promotes strand breaks during subsequent package unwinding processes.

As the textile industry began to demand larger strand packages, increased compressive forces in such packages and the more severe taper at the package ends due to increased package diameters combine to further intermesh strand portions at package ends. Accordingly, these packages augmented the already difficult problem of building a wound strand package that freely unwinds without strand breaks. Trapped strand, especially at tapered end portions of a package, presented a significant barrier to the commercial use of larger strand packages.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION An object of the invention is improved method of I and apparatus for packaging linear material.

- Another object of the invention is apparatus for and method of collecting linear material into wound packages, especially larger wound packages, that unwind without encountering entanglements causing the material to break.

Still another object of the invention is apparatus for and method of collecting a wound package of linear material where turns of the linear material at the ends of the package disposed substantially transverse of the package are displaced from each other.

These and other objects are attained by apparatus advancing linear material from a source to a collector and reciprocating the advancing linear material across a zone as the apparatus reciprocates the location of the zone with a modifying stroke length.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent as the invention is hereinafter described in more detail with reference made to the accompanying drawings.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a front elevation view of apparatus collecting glass strand in a continuous filament glass forming operation according to the principles of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a side elevation view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a somewhat schematic showing of components of the apparatus of FIGS. 1 and 2 for collecting glass strand according to the principles of the invention.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged view of the support and strand oscillator arrangement shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 5 is a view in cross section taken along the line 5-5 in FIG. 4.

FIG. '6 is a showing of the support illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2 that indicates some possible positions of the support.

FIG. 7 is a somewhat simplified view in perspective showing strand traversing apparatus according to the principles of the invention.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged front elevation view of the probe assembly shown in FIGS. 3 and 7.

FIG. 9 is a side elevation view partially in section showing an enlarged portion of the probe unit shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a somewhat simplified showing of an electrical control arrangement operating according to the principles of the invention.

FIG. 11 illustrates a modified support and strand oscillator arrangement according to the principles of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS While the method and apparatus of the invention are particularly valuable in processes of forming filaments of heat-softened fiber-forming mineral materials such as glass where apparatus combines individual filaments to form a textile strand prior to collecting the strand as a wound package, the method and apparatus may be used to package other linear material such monofilaments or multifilament linear material of other fiberforrning materials such as nylons, polyesters and the like. Thus, the use of glass is only an example to explain the operation of the invention, the invention having utility in other textile operations including processing yarn, cord, roving and the like.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show a process of forming continuous glass filaments from heat-softened glass where the apparatus combines the glass filaments into two textile strands. Each of the strands collects as a wound package. FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate a container or a feeder that holds a supply of molten glass. The arrangement may connect the container 10 to a forehearth that supplies molten glass from a furnace or may connect to other means for supplying glass such as marbles that a melter or other means associated with the container 10 reduces to a heat-softened condition. At the ends of the container 10 are terminals 12 that connect to a source of electrical energy to supply heat by conventional resistance heating to the glass held in the container 10 to maintain the glass at proper fiberforming temperatures and viscosities. The container 10 has a bottom 14 with a plurality of orifices or passageways for delivering streams 16 of molten glass from the container 10. As shown, the openings comprise a plurality of depending orificed projections or tubular members 18.

The molten streams 16 are attenuated into individual continuous glass filaments 20 and are combined into two bundles or strands 22 and 23 by gathering shoes 24 and 25 respectively located below the container 10.

While one may protect the filaments 20 by applying only water to them, it is desirable in most instances to apply sizing liquid or other protective coating material to the filaments. Nozzles 27 and 28 may be located near the bottom 14 to spray water onto the filaments 20, preferable prior to combining with filaments into the strands 22 and 23. Normally the arrangement provides an applicator 30 supported within a housing 31, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, to apply sizing liquid or other coating material to the filaments 20. The applicator 30 may be any suitable means known to the art such as an endless belt that moves through sizing or coating liquid held in the housing 31. As the filaments 20 pass across the surface of the applicator 30, some of the liquid on the applicator 30 transfers to them.

The strands 22 and 23 collect as wound packages 36 and 37 respectively on a winding machine 40. Strand traversing apparatus moves the advancing strands 22 and 23 back and forth lengthwise of the packages 36 and 37 as the strands wind on a collector such as tubes 34 and 35 telescoped over a spindle or collet 42, which is driven in rotation on the winder 40.

While the apparatus of the invention illustrates a process of attenuating two glass strands, one may employ the invention with one or more units of linear material such as strand, yarn, roving, and the like from other sources.

The strand traversing arrangement moves the advancing strands 22 and 23 back and forth lengthwise of the collecting tubes 34 and 35 to distribute the advancing strands on their respective collecting tubes as the winder builds the packages 36 and 37. The motion given to the strands by the traversing arrangement is a combination of movement from rapidly reciprocating the strands across a zone, movement from more slowly reciprocating the zone or location of the rapid reciprocating strand motion and movement from varying or changing the stroke length of the slower reciprocating motion. As shown, oscillators 44 and rapidly reciprocate the strands. A movable support assemblage 46 carrying the oscillators 44 and 45 on the winder 40 moves to more slowly reciprocate the location of the oscillators. Means within the winder 40 operates to vary the stroke length of the slower reciprocating motion.

A motor/clutch arrangement mounted within the housing 43- of the winder 40, through an appropriate drive system, controls both the speed of the oscillators 44 and 45 and the rotating speed of the collet 42. In the embodiment shown, a constant speed electrically energized motor 48 provides a drive for the rotor of an associated eddy current clutch 49. The clutch 49 includes the driven rotor and an output shaft 51. The clutch 49 uses magnetic forces to transfer torque from the driven rotor to the output shaft 51. A belt 52 transfers the rotational energy of the motors output shaft 51 to a collet drive shaft 53 located above the shaft 51 in the housing 43. The driven shaft 53 rotates the collet 42.

As more clearly seen in FIGS. 1 and 3, the oscillators 44 and 45 are driven by the rotational energy supplied to the collet drive shaft 53 through a drive arrangement including a speed reduction mechanism 58 and a winder drive portion within the support 46.

A belt 61 connects the drive shaft 53 with the input shaft 62 of the speed reducing mechanism 58. A belt 63 connects the output shaft 64 of the speed reducing mechanism with an oscillator drive shaft 66 that connects with the winder drive portion within the support 46 to move the oscillators 44 and 45.

As shown, the winder 40 locks together the speed of the collet 42 and the oscillators 44 and 45 in a predetermined ratio. One may change the ratio through careful use of various sized sheaves and the like. Moreover, one can change the ratio by modifying the speed reducer, e. g., speed reducing mechanism 58.

The oscillators 44 and 45 are of the spiral wire" type disclosed in US. Pat. to Beach, No. 2,391,879 and include a pair of substantially spirally shaped complimentary cam members carried by a rod member of traverse shaft 70. As more clearly shown in F IG. 4, the oscillator 44 includes cam members 72 and 74; in the case of the oscillator 45 the cam members are 76 and 78. As the oscillators 44 and 45 rotate on the traverse shaft 70, each of the oscillators rapidly reciprocates its engaging strand across a zone extending generally lengthwise of its respective collector on the collet 42.

The drive system within the support 46 rotates the oscillators 44 and 45 by rotating the traverse shaft 70. Referring more particularly to FIG. 4 one can see that the oscillator drive shaft 66 extends through a horizontal carrier tube 80, which is movably mounted on the winder 40. The oscillator drive shaft 66 can move lengthwise with the carrier tube 80 by means of a spline arrangement that permits the shaft 66 to move back and forth along its axis of rotation with the motion of the carrier tube 80 and still be driven in rotation. As illustrated, the axis of rotation of the shaft 66 lies along the longitudinal axis of the carrier tube 80. A bearing 82 provides a rotational mounting for the shaft 66 in the support 46. Within the assembly 46, a belt 84 transfers the rotational energy of the drive shaft 66 to a shaft 86 extending parallel to the drive shaft 66. Shaft 86 mounts for rotation in bearings 87 and 88. A belt 92 transfers the rotational energy of the shaft 86 to a drive whirl 94 that mounts for rotation in bearings 96. The drive whirl 94 engages the traverse shaft at one end and rotates it, the whirl 94 and the shaft 70 being suitably connected. As illustrated, the shaft 70 has a square end portion 97 that mates with a reversed recessed portion 98 of the drive whirl 94.

As the winder 40 collects the strands 22 and 23 to build the packages 36 and 37 respectively, the winder 40 reduces the speed of the collet 42 and oscillators 44 and 45 together in a selected manner to maintain substantially constant linear strand speed, which keeps the diameter of the attenuated filaments 20 substantially uniform. Because the speed of the collet 42 and traverse shaft 70 mechanically lock together in drive at the drive shaft 53, they are regulated together by the speed of the output shaft 51. The speed reducing mechanism fixes their speeds together in a fixed ratio. As mentioned herein, one may change the ratio by varying the size ofsheaves or with variations in the speed reducing mechanism 58. Also, one may use separate drive systems regulated together to provide speed reduction to the collet 42 and the traverse shaft 70.

One may reduce the rotational speed of the output shaft 51 in various ways. One such way employs the motor/clutch arrangement disclosed where the speed of the motor 48 remains substantially constant throughout the buildup of the packages and the arrangement reduces the electrical flux in the eddy current clutch to reduce the speed of the output shaft 51 in a selected manner. The greater the flux density (magnetic force) the larger is the percent of the motors output rotation speed (the input side of the clutch) that transfers to the output shaft 51. As the package increases in diameter, the flux density in the clutch 49 collapses at a selected rate through a control device or programmer. The programmer may be of the character disclosed and described in US. Pat. No. 3,109,602.

The support means or assembly 46 provides substantially infinite adjustment for the oscillators 44 and 45 and includes a rearward unit 110 and forward unit 112, each of which moves about a separate axis spaced from the collet 42 and packages 36 and 37.

The rearward unit 110 is normally mounted on the housing 43 of the winder 40. The unit 1 l0 mounts at its rearward portion on the carrier tube 80 that extends horizontally from within the winder 40. The tube 80 extends into the unit 110, which has its axis of rotation along the axis of the tube 80. The arrangement permits unit 1 to move about the longitudinal axis of the carrier tube 80.

The forward unit 1 l2 mounts on the forward portion of the rearward unit 110 and, as illustrated, includes two connected longitudinal members-117 and 118 and end holders 119 and 120 respectively. As shown, the longitudinal members 117 and 118 are tubular members rotatably mounted on a common axis. As seen in FIG. 4 the longitudinal member- 117 extends from the left side of the rearward member 110. The drive shaft 86 is in the longitudinal member 117. The longitudinal member 118 is a shorter unit and extends from the rearward unit 110 to the right as shown in FIG. 4. in the embodiment shown there is no drive apparatus associated with the tube 118. Securely mounted at the outer ends of the members 117 and 118 are the end holders 119 and 120 respectively. The holders 119 and 120 move with the member to which they are secured. Each holder is elbow shaped, i.e., extends along the length of its associated member then turns to extend laterally from such member. As shown, the holders 119 and 120 make a right angle turn. The belt 92 and drive whirl 94 are in the holder 1 19.

The end holders 119 and 120 support the shaft at both ends. As one end the shaft 70 engages the drive whirl 94 that is within the holder 119. The other end engages a member 122 that has recess 121 for receiving the end of the shaft 70. The member 122 rotatably mounts in bearings 123 that are within the holder 120.

The members 117 and 118 are connected for movement together. As shown in FIG. 4 a bridge means including a long shell connector 126 fixed to the inward end of the do not 1 17 and a shorter shell connector 128 fixed to the inward end of the member 118. Bolt 129 joins the shell connectors together. clamps. Matching surround The support 46 includes means for keeping the cooperatively associated units 110 and 112 in rigid relationship to maintain the oscillators 44 and 45 in desired position relative to the collet 42. An example of a clamping arrangement is shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. As illustrated, there are.three clamping zones comprising three clamps 134, 135 and 136. These clamps are lon gitudinal members with flanges extending along their lengthwise edges, e.g., flanges 137 and 138 for the cap clamps 134 and 136 respectively as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. Each of the cap clamps includes the concave portion extending on one surface along its length that fits lengthwise over the associated longitudinal member or tube that it clamps. Matching concave portions are fashioned in the rearward unit 110 along its lengthwise edge surfaces. In the forward edge surfaces are concave portions for longitudinal members 117 and 118; the rearward edge surface of the unit 110 has a concave portion for the carrier tube 80. When the members 117, 118 and the tube are in position as shown in FIG. 5 with the matching concave portions of the member and the cap clamps located to substantially surround them, there forms an effective gripping or clamping arrangement tightened in position by bolts 129 piercing the flanges of the cap clamps and that thread into the unit 110. Because the cap clamps do not close the circle-like passageway formed by the matching concave portions of the unit 110 of the cap clamps, a space remains between them as shown in FIG. 5. Increased pressure on the various members may be accomplished by threading the bolts 139 more tightly into the unit 110. When one fixes all cap clamps tightly against their associated members, a rigid support assembly 46 ensues that holds the oscillators 44 and 45 in desired position.

The cooperatively associated and connected units 110 and 112 more to a substantially infinite variety of operating positions. As shown in FIG. 6, the rearward unit 110 moves about its axis located at its rearward position. Such axis lies along the longitudinal axis of the carrier tube 80 and the oscillator drive shafts 66, such axes being spaced from the collet 42. The forward unit 112 moves about a separate axis extending in the direction parallel to the axis of the unit 110. Such axis lies on the axis common to the members 117 and 118 and also is spaced outwardly of the collet 42.

The rearward unit 110 can move freely 360 degrees about its axis. Because of the nature of its connection to the rearward unit 110, the forward unit cannot move at a full 360 degrees about its axis. For example, the operation in one embodiment provides the forward unit 112 the movement about its axis upwardly from a horizontal position 1 17 and movement from the horizontal position downwardly 54, such movement being a total movement of l7 1".

The winder 40 reciprocates the support 46 lengthwise of the collet 42 and includes means for varying the stroke length of the reciprocating motion imparted to the support 46. Three components within the winder 40 cooperate to reciprocate the support 46 with varying stroke lengths. These components are a ball screw assembly 140, a clutch unit 142 and a probe assembly 144. The ball screw assembly 140 and the clutch unit 142 form a drive arrangement moving the support 46; the probe assembly 144 controls the stroke length of the reciprocating motion imparted to the support 46.

As more clearly seen in H0. 7 the ball screw assembly 140 includes a rotatably mounted longitudinal member 146 having outside threads 148 and a bridge member 150. The longitudinal member 146 cannot move lengthwise and extends parallel to the carrier tube 80. The bridge member 150 connects the carrier tube 80 and the longitudinal member 146. At one end the bridge 150 securely holds the carrier tube 80. At its other end the bridge member 150 threadingly engages the longitudinal member 146. The other end of the bridge 50 includes a threaded passageway through which the longitudinal member 146 extends. Because the longitudinal member 146 cannot move lengthwise, the threads 148 move the bridge member 150 along the length of the longitudinal member 146 as the member rotates. When the bridge member 150 moves lengthwise on the threaded longitudinal member 146, it carries the carrier tube 80 with it. When one rotates the longitudinal member 146 in one direction, the bridge member 150 moves towards one end of the member 146; when one rotates the longitudinal member in the opposite direction, the bridge member 150 moves towards the other end of the longitudinal member 146. Accordingly, altematingly rotating the longitudinal member 146 reciprocates the support means 46. The clutch unit 142 rotates the longitudinal member 146 either direction. The probe assembly 144 causes the clutch unit 142 to alternate the direction it rotates the longitudinal member 146.

The clutch unit 142 includes an input section 152 and an output section 154. The input section includes a continuously running electric motor 156, which may be a variable speed motor, and an input shaft 158. The motor 156 rotates the input shaft 158 through a belt 160 connecting the output shaft 161 of the motor 156 with the input shaft 158. The input section 152 further includes a spur gear 162 rotatably mounted on the input shaft 158, an electromagnet 164 adjacent to the spur gear 162 and fixed on and rotating with the input shaft 158 and a pulley 166 also fixed on the shaft 158. Upon being electrically energized, the electromagnet 164 engages the spur gear 162 to hold that gear for rotation with the input shaft 158.

The output section 154 of the clutch unit 142 is driven by the input section 152 and includes a rotatably mounted output shaft 168 that connects with the longitudinal member 146 at a coupling 169. The output section 154 further includes a spur gear 172 fixed on the output shaft 168, and electromagnet 174 fixed on the output shaft 168 and a pulley 176 adjacent to the electromagnet 174 rotatably mounted on the output shaft 168. The spur gears 162 and 172 are disposed in meshing relationship. The pulleys 166 and 176 oppose each other and communicate through a belt 178 connecting the two pulleys. Upon being electrically energized, the electromagnet 174 engages the pulley 176 to hold it for rotation with the output shaft 168.

By electrically energizing the electromagnets alternately the winder 40 rotates the output shaft 168 first in one direction and then the other direction. When energizing only the electromagnet 174 the pulley 176 becomes fixed on the output shaft 168. The rotating input shaft 158 drives the output shaft 168 through the belt 178 connecting the pulleys 166 and 176. Under such conditions the spur gear 162 merely idles on the input shaft 158. When energizing electromagnet 164, the spur gear 162 becomes fixed on the rotating input shaft 158 and drives the output shaft 168 in the opposite direction through the meshing spur gear 172. Under such conditions the pulley 176 idles on the output shaft 168.

One can employ suitable means to vary the speed of the output shaft 168, and hence the rpm of the longitudinal member 146. For example, if one uses a variable speed motor as the motor 156, one needs only to vary the speed of the motor to change the rpm of the longitudinal member 146.

The probe assembly 144 controls the stroke length of reciprocating motion imparted to the supported means 46 by controlling electrical power to the electromagnets 164 and 174. The probe assembly 144 includes probe units 180 and 182, an electrically conductive probe spring 183, a drive arrangement and a cooperating support arrangement carrying the probe units 180 and 182, an electrically conductive probe spring 183, a drive arrangement and a cooperating support arrangement carrying the probe units 180 and 182. The drive arrangement includes an electric motor such as a stepping motor 184 which can be a SLO-SYN synchronous motor manufactured by the Superior Electric Company, and a drive pinion 186 rotated by the motor 184 through a belt 188 connecting the output shaft 189 of the motor 184 with the drive pinion 186. One can operate the winder 40 with the motor 184 either energized or not energized.

As more clearly seen in FIG. 8, the probe support arrangement as shown includes two spaced apart parallel extending rods 192 and 194 that carry the probe units 180 and 182. The rods 192 and 194 have outside threads 196 and 198 respectively. As shown, the threads 196 are left handed threads and the threads 198 are right handed threads.

I The probe units 180 and 182 include small spur drive gears 202 and 204 respectively. These gears threadingly engage one of the rods and mesh with the drive pinion 186. As shown, the gear 202 is on the rod 192 and the gear 204 is on the rod 194. As the drive pinion rotates, it rotates the gears 202 and 204 on their respective threaded rods and accordingly each gear moves its respective unit on the support arrangement.

As shown, the probe units 180 and 182 are identical except for the spur drive gears 202 and 204. Each probe unit 180 and 182 includes an electrical conductive probe, i.e. probes 210 and 211 respectively. FIG. 9 more clearly shows the construction of probe unit 180 that includes end wall portions 206 and 208, the electrical conductive probe 211 and a spacer 212. Each side wall portion includes appropriate openings through which the threaded rods 192 and 194 and drive pinion 186 extend.

The probe spring 183 is on the bridge 150 of the ball screw assembly 140 between the probes 210 and 211 and in alignment to contact the probes as the bridge 150 moves on the longitudinal member 146. The probe spring 183 and the probes form part of an electrical switching arrangement that controls electrical power to the electromagnets 164 and 174. When the probe spring 183 contacts the probe 210, the contact between them causes a circuit to supply electrical power to the electromagnet 164. When the probe spring 183 contacts the probe 211 the switching arrangement interrupts electrical power to the electromagnet 164 and supplies electrical power to the electromagnet 174.

In operation, movement of the support 46 reverses when the probe spring 183 contacts one of the probes. As the output shaft 168 of the clutch unit 142 rotates the longitudinal member 146 of the ball screw assembly 140 in a direction to move the bridge member 150 and the probe spring 183 towards one of the probes, the bridge member 150 moves the carrier tube 80 and hence the support 46 with it. Upon contact between a probe and the probe spring 183, electrical power changes from one of the electromagriets to the other electromagnet. Because the rotating direction of the output shaft 168 and the longitudinal member 146 reverses, movement of the bridge member 150 on the longitudinal member 146 also reverses and accordingly support 46, and carrier tube 80, move in the opposite direction. As the bridge member 150 moves in the opposite direction, it brings the probe spring 183 into contact with the other probe. The switching arrangement changes electrical power-to the electromagnets and the cycle repeats itself to reciprocate the support 46.

FIG. 10 shows a simple probe assembly switching arrangement for use in alternating electrical current between the electromagnets 164 and 174. The arrangement shown in FIG. 10 uses a latching relay 213 that includes coils 216 and 217 and a switching arm 214 pivotally mounted at its midlength 215. The arrangement supplies electrical current from a suitable source to the relay 213 at L,. The probe spring 183 is electrically grounded. As the probe spring 183 moves into contact with the probe 210, electrical current flows from L to ground through the coil 216, the probe 210 and the probe spring 183. As the current flows through the coil 216 the coil becomes energized and solenoid forces pull the switching arm 214 to close a switch as A to energize the electromagnet 164, which is electrically grounded. Current flows from L, to ground through the electromagnet 164. As the probe spring 183 breaks contact with the probe 210 and begins moving towards the probe 211, a permanent magnet 218 holds the arm 214 to keep the switch at A closed and the electromagnet 164 energized. As the probe spring 183 moves into contact with the probe 211 electrical current flows from L to ground through the coil 217,

the probe 211 and the probe spring 183. As current flows through the coil 217 the coil becomes energized and solenoid forces overcome the force of the magnet 218 and pull the switching arm 214 to close a switch at "B to flow current from L to the electromagnet 174, which is electrically grounded. The dashed lines indicate such a condition. As probe spring 183 breaks contact with the probe 211 and begins moving back towards the probe 210, a permanent magnet 219 holds the arm 214 to keep the switch at B closed and the electromagnet 174 energized. The cycle repeats.

The distance between the probes 210 and 211 determines the stroke length imparted to the reciprocating support 46. When the motor 184 is not operating the probes 210 and 211 remain at a fixed distance and the support 6 reciprocates with a constant stroke. When the motor 184 drives the pinion 186, the distance between the probes 210 and 211 changes and the support 46 reciprocates with a varying stroke length. A number of commercially available controls and switching can be used to cause the stepping motor 184 to move its output shaft 189 first in one direction and then the other to change the direction of rotation of the pinion 186 to modify the distance between the probes 210 and 211 in a selected manner both towards and away from each other. For example one can use a commercial reversible variable speed drive, denoted by the reference numeral 185, such as a SLO-SYN Adjustable Speed Drive, type ST250B-1015, manufactured by the Superior Electric Company, together with a repeat cycle timer, denoted by the reference numeral 187, such as the type manufactured by the Eagle Signal Division of the E. W. Bliss Company. The timer 187 actuates the reversing switches of the drive 185. The drive 185 such as the SLO-SYN Adjustable Speed Drive includes a pulse generator section that can vary the speed of the stepping motor 184.

The drive and support arrangement moves the probes 210 and 211 either towards or away from each other, depending upon the direction of rotation. given to the drive pinion 186 by the motor 184. Accordingly, the stroke length of the moving support 46 changes, i.e. either increases or decreases in length, at both ends. While one can operate the apparatus to progressively decrease or increase the stroke length throughout a package build, the apparatus is normally operated by reciprocating the support 46 with decreasing and increasing stroke lengths. One can vary the rate of change in stroke length by varying the speed at which the stepping motor 184 rotates the drive pinion 186. One can adjust the frequency output of the pulse generator section of the drive 185 to vary the speed of the motor 184.

One can easily modify the probe assembly to move only one probe and the rate of change of that probes location. Moreover, one may vary the probe assembly to move the probes together in the same direction, either equal or unequal distances and to move the probes at the same or different speeds.

It is possible to operate the winder 40 and vary the distance between the probes only during a portion of the time the packages collect. The time during which the winder 40 varies the stroke length of the support 46 can be a relatively short time or a greater portion of the time the packages collect.

Referring to FIG. 3, an operator, in operating the apparatus, locates the oscillators 44 and 45 at a desired position relative to the collet 42 and closes a switch 220 of a control box 222 to provide electrical power to the winder 40 from a suitable electrical source supplied to I. and L When the switch 220 closes, the motor 48 energizes; however, the clutch 49 does not energize until the operator closes a foot operated switch 224, whereupon the collet 42 begins to rotate. Next the operator wraps the strands 22 and 23 on the collet 42 outwardly of the sleeves 34 and 35. When the collet 42 and oscillators 44 and 45 attain proper speeds, the operator moves the advancing strands 22 and 23 to engage the oscillators. Collection of the packages 36 and 37 begins.

As the packages build, the speed of the collet 42 and the traverse shaft .70 progressively reduces by action of the programmer through controlled collapse of the flux density in the clutch 49. Because the speeds of the collet 42 and oscillators 44 and 45 reduce together as the packages enlarge in diameter, the strands maintain a substantially constant linear speed throughout the build of the packages.

As the strands 22 and 23 advance to their respective collectors, the oscillators 44 and 45 reciprocate the strands 22 and 23 respectively to reciprocate them across a zone to distribute the strands on their collectors. Further, the winder 40 reciprocates the zone with increasing and decreasing stroke lengths by reciprocating the support 46.

As the winder 40 reciprocates support 46 with a changing stroke length modified at both ends to terminate the strokes at different locations, the traversing apparatus more fully disperses the turn around regions of the strands 22 and 23 at the ends of their respective packages. Such a traversing action lays the strand turns that are more transversely oriented on a package onto strand turns more longitudinally oriented on the package, accordingly precluding end zones comprising parallel strand turns in side-by-side touching relationship. Of course, if the winder 40 operates to modify the support stroke at one end only, dispersing the strand turn around regions occurs only at one package end.

When the winder 40 completes the packages 36 and 37, suitable break means stops the collet 42. FIG. 3 illustrates an air operated disc brake arrangement for stopping the collet 42 where an air operated cylinder moves clamps 230 to engage a disc 232 located on the collet drive shaft 53. Upon completion of the packages the clamps 230 engage the disc 232 to stop rotation of the collet 42, electrical power being concomitantly broken to the eddy current clutch 49.

When the collet 42 stops, the operator removes the completed packages 36 and 37 and places new forming sleeves or collectors on the collet.

FIG. 11 illustrates a modified support 236 and oscillator arrangement for use with the winder 40.

The oscillator arrangement provides fast reciprocating motion to the strands 22 and 23 similar to the fast reciprocating motion provided by the oscillators 44 and 45. The oscillator arrangement includes strand guides 240 and 242 and a cylindrical cam 244 rotatably mounted on a fixed support shaft 246 in a tubular housing 248 that is on the support 236. The cylindrical cam 244 extends parallel to the collet 42 and possesses two separate sets of identical cam grooves 250 and 252. The strand guides 240 and 242 engage the grooves 250 and 252 respectively through cam followers 254 and 256 on the guides. As the cylindrical cam 244 rotates the strand guides 240 and 242 reciprocate along a guide slot 258 running lengthwise in the tubular housing 248. The dashed lines S and S indicate the stroke made by the reciprocating strand guides 240 and 242. This arrangement normally provides longer reciprocating strokes than the spiral wires 44 and 45. Thus in this arrangement one can more easily reciprocate a strand across a longer zone. initially engage As shown, each of the strand guides 240 and 242 have a slot beyond which extends extension portions 241 and 243 respectively. As the guides 240 and 242 initially engage a moving strand, the strand moves along the side of a guide and into a slot, the extension portion precluding movement away from the slot. Thus, the guides 240 and 242 as shown are self threadmg. g

The support 236 provides the same adjustment for the traversing arrangement as the support 46 provides to the oscillators 44 and 45 on the traversing shaft and includes a rearward unit 260 and a forward unit 262. Each of the units move about a separate axis spaced from the collet 42.

The rearward unit 260 movably mounts on the housing 43 of the winder 40 and mounts at its rearward portion on the carrier tube which extends into the unit 260.

The forward unit 262 mounts on the forward portion of the rearward unit 260 and includes a support tube 264 and a holder 266. The support tube 264 extends from the right hand side of the forward portion of the rearward unit 260 as viewed in FIG. 10 and connects with the holder 266, which is similar to the end holder of the support 46. The tubular housing 248 extends from the forward portion of the holder 266 in a direction parallel to the collet 42 and the carrier tube The support 236 includes means for keeping the cooperately associated units 260 and 262 in rigid relationship to maintain the guides 240 and 242 in desired position relative to the collet 42. The support 236 uses a clamping arrangement that is of the same type described with respect to the support 46 and includes cap clamps 268 and 270. When one fixes these cap clamps tightly against their associated members, a rigid support assembly 136 ensues that holds the guides 240 and 242 in desired position.

A drive system within the support 236 rotates the cylindrical cam 244 to reciprocate the guides 240 and 242. Within the support 236 a belt 274 transfers the rotational energy of the drive shaft 66 to a shaft 276 extending parallel to the drive shaft 66. The shaft 276 mounts for rotation in bearings 277 nd 278. A belt 280 transfers the rotational energy of the shaft 276 to a drive whirl 282 that is rotatably mounted on the fixed 1. Apparatus for packaging linear material compristhreads as the rod is rotated, means for rotating the ing: rod in either direction, the bridge member being aframe; moved towards one end of the rod as the rod is a rotatably mounted collector on the frame upon rotated in one direction and being moved towards which advancing linear material is wound as a the other ends as the rod is rotated in the other package; direction, two movably mounted probes, means means for rotating the collector; selectively moving at least one of the probes ala support movably mounted on the frame; ternately towards and away from the other probe an oscillator on the support for rapidly reciprocating as the lin a mat ri is u d on the collector, the advancing linear material to distribute the Contact means on the bridge member between a li ar t i l on th ll t a d in alignment with the probes to contact the probes means for reciprocating the support in a direction as the bridge member moves on the rod, electrical generally parallel to the axis of rotation of the colswitching means electrically Connected with the lector with a stroke length increasing and decreas- Probes, the Switching means causing the means for ing between Selected limits, the means f rotating the rod to reverse the rotational movereciprocating the support including athreaded rod ment lmpal'ted to the ted upon contact between mounted for rotation about its longitudinal axis, a one of the ptetfes t e eontaet meansbridge member Connecting the Support and the 2. Apparatus recited in claim 1 where the means for threaded rod, the bridge member being fixed to selectively moving at least one of the probes includes a the support and being mounted on the threaded Variable speed elecmcalmmorrod for movement lengthwise of the rod by the

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3768751 *Aug 14, 1972Oct 30, 1973Western Electric CoMethods of and apparatus for continuously reeling strand material
US4881694 *Sep 15, 1988Nov 21, 1989Barmag, AgYarn traversing apparatus for a winding machine
US4911370 *Dec 8, 1987Mar 27, 1990Barmag AgMethod and apparatus for winding yarn
US7866590 *Jun 20, 2006Jan 11, 2011Saint-Gobain Technical Fabrics EuropeWinding frame with monitored secondary travel
US20030172683 *Feb 11, 2003Sep 18, 2003Chi TangRovings and methods and systems for producing rovings
US20100096488 *Jun 20, 2006Apr 22, 2010Saint-Gobain Technical Fabrics EuropeWinding frame with monitored secondary travel
CN101263070BJun 20, 2006Oct 23, 2013欧洲圣戈班技术结构公司Winding frame with monitored secondary travel
CN103537626A *Sep 26, 2013Jan 29, 2014沈阳工业大学Device and method for winding carbon fiber on steel needle
WO2002008106A2 *Jul 19, 2001Jan 31, 2002Advanced Glassfiber Yarns, LlcMethod and apparatus for producing cylindrical packages of glass fiber strands
WO2002008106A3 *Jul 19, 2001Jun 13, 2002Advanced Glassfiber Yarns LlcMethod and apparatus for producing cylindrical packages of glass fiber strands
WO2006136751A3 *Jun 20, 2006May 31, 2007Jean-Marc BouvierWinding frame with monitored secondary travel
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/476.8, 242/477.3, 242/472.8, 242/920, 242/480.4, 242/481.8, 242/483.3
International ClassificationB65H54/32, B65H54/38, C03B37/035, B65H54/48, D01D7/00, B65H54/28
Cooperative ClassificationY10S242/92, B65H54/385, B65H54/2893, B65H54/32, B65H2701/3122
European ClassificationB65H54/28S, B65H54/38C, B65H54/32
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 31, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION, FIBERGLAS TOW
Free format text: TERMINATION OF SECURITY AGREEMENT RECORDED NOV. 13, 1986. REEL 4652 FRAMES 351-420;ASSIGNORS:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, A DE. BANKING CORPORATION;WADE, WILLIAM J. (TRUSTEES);REEL/FRAME:004903/0501
Effective date: 19870730
Owner name: OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION, A CORP. OF DE
Free format text: TERMINATION OF SECURITY AGREEMENT RECORDED NOV. 13, 1986. REEL 4652 FRAMES 351-420;ASSIGNORS:WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, A DE. BANKING CORPORATION;WADE, WILLIAM J. (TRUSTEES);REEL/FRAME:4903/501
Nov 13, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J., ONE RODNEY SQUARE NORTH, WILMIN
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:004652/0351
Effective date: 19861103
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, ONE RODNEY SQUARE NORTH,
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY,DELAWARE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:OWENS-CORNING FIBERGLAS CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:4652/351
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J.,DELAWARE
Owner name: WADE, WILLIAM, J., DELAWARE
Owner name: WILMINGTON TRUST COMPANY, DELAWARE