Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3698367 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1972
Filing dateJun 21, 1971
Priority dateJun 21, 1971
Publication numberUS 3698367 A, US 3698367A, US-A-3698367, US3698367 A, US3698367A
InventorsOrval L Goodwin
Original AssigneeAllan Pump And Supply Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas carburetor valve
US 3698367 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Goodwin [54] GAS CARBURETOR VALVE FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1 lnvenwfl 2'" Gwdwin, Grat Bend. 53,349 10/1942 Netherlands ..123/120 ans.

[73] Assignee: Allan Pump and Supply, Incl, Great Examiner-Wendell Bums B d K Assistant Examiner-A. M. Zupcic Filed June 21 1971 Attorney-Miller & Brown 211 Appl. No.: 154,866 57 ABSTRACT A gaseous fuel carburetion device utilized with a [52] US. Cl ..123/120, 137/604, 261/64 C, reciprocating piston engine fueled with low pressure gas; the valve having a first check valve connecting to II!!- atmosphere allowing outside air to be sucked in but Fleld Search --123/120; 137/604; 64 preventing the low pressure gas from flowing into the 261/64 62 atmosphere, and a second check valve connecting with the intake of the engine allowing air and gas to [56] References cued flow into the engine only on the suction stroke, anda UNITED STATES PATENTS iZlGfldlilVfllVe controlling the maximum rate of gas flow rom e source. 3,463,232 8/1969 Kneck ..123/1l9 B 3,181,833 5/1965 Adams et al. ..123/1 19 B 9 Claims, 1 Drawing Figure ENGINE 4o INTAKE I C742 l0 FUEL l l 22 INLET 25 I E l |2 25 l4 AIR 38 FILTER PATENTEDum 17 I972 ENGINE 4/40 INTAKE AIR FILTER INVENTOR ORVAL L. GOODWIN WM? GAS CARBURETOR VALVE BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION In the oil field numerous one and two cylinder engines used to purhp wells have been converted from liquid fuels to gaseous type fuels such as LPG, casing head gas or any other available gas. The gas supplied to the engine is under a positive pressure and constantly flowing into the intake manifold. These engines, with a relative low speed and long stroke, have a substantial time interval between power strokes thereby creating an erratic manifold pressure. When the manifold pressure drops off some of the supply gas escapes out of the air intake pipe between suction strokes. This lossof gas to the atmosphere creates a very inefficient usage of fuel, especially when it must be purchased. In the case of marginal production wells, the cost of gas to run the well becomes a substantial factor.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION With the present invention, there is no escape of gas into the atmosphere, and the fuel and air mixture can be accurately controlled, thereby providing a much greater combustion efficiency. Between the suction strokes of the engine, a check valve prevents any of the low pressure gas from passing into the atmosphere. A second check valve prevents the gas from prematurely flowing into the engine intake manifold until the manifold suction is great enough to raise the ball. The present invention also allows an engine to operate on casing head gas at much reduced pressures than previously required. This allows the well to be run for a considerably longer time at a much reduced cost before bottle gas or other types of gas are brought to the well site. The present valve also provides a very accurate fuel-to-air mixture control for providing most efficient combustion.

I It is therefore the primary object of the present invention to provide a gas saving carburetion valve on single and multi-piston engines.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a gas carburetion valve which accurately controls the fuel-air mixture.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a valve which prevents any wasting of gas when the engine stops running.

Further objects and advantages will be in part apparent and in part pointed out specifically hereinafter in connection with the description of the drawing that follows and in which:

The FIGURE is a longitudinal sectional view of the gas carburetion valve with related portions of the engine illustrated in block diagram.

Referring now to the FIGURE of the drawing, the overall valve is generally identified by reference numeral 10. The valve comprises a tubular body portion 12 with a main passage 14 passing therethrough. intersecting the body 12 and main passage 14 is a fuel inlet conduit 16 which is in turn connected to a source of low pressure gas 18, indicated in block form. If the fuel is bottled gas, a conventional regulator, not shown, provides a constant low pressure in the conduit 16. At the entry of conduit 16 into the main passage is a needle valve 20, which works in conjunction with seat 22. The needle valve 20 is varied to achieve the proper gas flow into the main passage 14 and then locked in place by nut 24. In the downstream portion of the main passage 14 is an enlarged bore 25. Bore 25 is formed with atapered portion 26 at its lower end. Immediately below the tapered portion is an O-ring 27 seated in a groove. The O-ring 27 provides a valve seat for check valve ball 28 positioned in enlarged bore 25. Located in the upstream portion of the main passage is a second check valve ball 30 located in a similar enlarged bore 32 with a tapered lower portion 34 terminating at the edge of an Oring 30 seated in a groove. The balls 28 and Mean be made of steel or other lighter materials depending upon the desired cracking pressure that is necessary. When using bottled gas, the upper ball is steel and the lower ball is a lightweight plastic. Intersecting the 'main passage above each of the balls 28 and 30 are a pair of removable bolts 36 and 37 which limit the upper movement of the balls. The downstream end of main passage 14 is connected to atmospheric air,

passing through an air filter 38, indicated by block diagram. The upstream end of main passage 14 is connected to the engine intake manifold 40, indicated by block diagram.

OPERATION While the gas carburetion valve 10 can be used on multi-cylinder engines, its greatest fuel saving is achieved when used on the one cyllinder engines. These engines, due to their low speed and long stroke, have a substantial time interval between suction strokes, allowing a greater amount of gas to pass out through the air intake between strokes. With valve 10 mounted on an engine, the source of gaseous fuel 18 maintains in conduit 16 a pressure between I and 3 ounces per square inch. When the engine is not running, the gas is confined in the valve 10 because the downstream ball check 28 prevents flow to the atmosphere, and the upper ball check 30 requires at least 4 ounces of pressure to lift the ball 30 off its 0-ring seat 35. The cracking pressure of ball check 30 can be varied by increasing or decreasing the weight of the ball 30 or the inside diameter of the O-ring 35.

Prior to the use of the present valve, gas pressures of from 6 to 12 ounces were required to operate an engine. With the present valve 10, pressures of only 1 to 3 ounces are required, thereby allowing many wells to use low pressure casing head gas at the well, rather than expensive bottled or piped in gas. Practically any burnable gas such as methane, propane, butane, LPG, natural gas or casing head gas can be used, with the latter being the most practical. If a very low pressure casing head gas is being used, the downstream ball check 28 should be a heavy steel so that a greater mainfold suction is applied to the gas supply conduit 16. Under this arrangement, casing head gas pressures approximating zero can be utilized to fuel an engine. When piped or bottled gas is being utilized, the downstream ball 28 should be a lightweight nylon. Since different engines run at different speeds and different loads, the gas flow must be individually adjusted on each specific engine by the positioning of needle valve 20 and the usage of the proper weight balls.

Having described the invention with sufficient clarity to enable those familiar with the art to construct and use it, I claim:

1. A gaseous fuel carburetion valve connecting a low pressure gas supply to the intake manifold of a reciprocating engine comprising:

a body member having a main passage connecting the intake manifold to atmospheric air;

a gas supply passage intersecting the main passage;

a first check valve positioned in the main passage so as to prevent any of the low pressure gas from flowing from the main passage to atmospheric air and an opening to allow atmospheric air to be sucked into the engine through the main passage; and

a second check valve in the main passage between the gas supply passage and the intake manifold allowing gas to flow into the intake manifold.

2. A carburetion valve as set forth in claim 1, wherein the two check valves are of the ball type requiring a minimum back pressure to open.

3. A carburetion valve as set forth in claim 1, including a flow restricting valve in the supply passage, the second check valve being a ball type and having a weight sufficient to prevent opening of the check valve by the low pressure gas supply.

4. A carburetion valve as set forth in claim 1, wherein the second check valve is a ball type having sufficient weight not to open under the low pressure gas supply and the first check valve is of the ball type having a lightweight ball which will open under a minimum pressure differential.

5. A carburetion valve as set forth in claim 1, the first and second check valves being of the ball type with balls having sufficient weight not to'open under pressures less than 4 ounces per square inch.

6. A carburetion valve as set forth in claim 1, including a flow restricting valve in the supply passage, the first and second check valves being of the ball type having an O-ring seat, the portions of the main passage immediately upstream of the O-ring seats having an outward taper whereby the opening of the check valve becomes greater as the ball moves away from its respective seat.

7. A carburetion valve as set forth in claim 1, including a flow restricting valve in the supply passage, the first and second check valves being of the ball type having an O-ring seat, the portions of the main passage immediately upstream of the O-ring seats having an out? ward taper whereby the opening of the check valve becomes greater as the ball moves away from its respective seat, and removable stop means in the main passage limiting the upward movement of the check valve balls. I

8. A carburetion valve as set forth in claim 1, including a needle valve positioned in the supply passage, the

i first and second check valves being steel balls of at least having a cracking pressure of less than 4 ounces per square inch.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4711744 *Apr 4, 1986Dec 8, 1987Tillotson, Ltd.Starting aid for small internal combustion engines
US4820454 *Oct 14, 1987Apr 11, 1989Tillotson LimitedStarting aid for small internal combustion engines
US5419924 *May 2, 1994May 30, 1995Applied Materials, Inc.Chemical vapor deposition method and apparatus therefore
US6189517 *Feb 12, 1998Feb 20, 2001Avl Powertrain Engineering, Inc.Internal combustion engine with low viscosity fuel system
US6394425 *Apr 28, 2000May 28, 2002Walbro Japan, Inc.Carburetor with a rotary throttle valve
US7108251Feb 6, 2004Sep 19, 2006Kohler CompanyFuel enrichment system for carburetors for internal combustion engines
US7267327Oct 27, 2004Sep 11, 2007Walbro Japan, Inc.Throttle valve assembly and dust seal for a carburetor
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/529, 261/64.4, 261/65, 261/61, 137/897, 261/62
International ClassificationF02B43/00, F02M21/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02B43/00, Y02T10/32, F02M21/04, F02M35/10275
European ClassificationF02M21/04