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Publication numberUS3698807 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 17, 1972
Filing dateJan 21, 1971
Priority dateJan 21, 1971
Also published asCA963521A1
Publication numberUS 3698807 A, US 3698807A, US-A-3698807, US3698807 A, US3698807A
InventorsWeigl John W
Original AssigneeXerox Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Displaying and printing apparatus
US 3698807 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [is] 3,698,807 Weigl 1 Oct. 17, 1972 [54] DISPLAYING AND PRINTING Primary Examiner-Samuel S. Matthews APPARATUS Assistant Examinerl(enneth C. Hutchison Attorney-James J. 'Ralabate, Albert A. Mahassel, [72] Inventor. John W. Weigl, West Webster, NY. Samuel E Mo and Mam & Jangarathis [73] Assignee: Xerox Corporation, Stamford,

Conn. v [57] ABSTRACT [22] Filed: Jan. 21, 1971 Apparatus in which graphic information is simultaneously displayed and reproduced. Images of material on [21] Appl' 108297 microfilm are projected toward a photoreceptor consisting of an electrostatically charged photoconductive 52 us. Cl. ..355/45, 355/3, 355/8 element, to form an electrostatic latent image which is 51 lnt.Cl. ..G03b 13/28 later developed- The optical P from the Original [58] Field of Search ..355/44, 45, 5, 32, 3,4, 17; material to the photoreceptor is intercepted y an 95 22; 3 5 7 image-splitting dlchroic reflector or interference filter, which reflects a spectral portion of the image to a l 56] References Cited viewing screen. After passing through the reflector the unreflected spectral portion impinges on the charged UNITED STATES PATENTS photoreceptor to form the latent image. The reflector or filter is chosen so that the wavelength range of the 3536483 10/1970 Yahlyuklb l 355/3 x light passing through it corresponds to the range of V atana 6 et a 55 17 maximum sensitivity of the photoreceptor. To scan the 94162 7/1971 l X image a shield having a slit moves laterally across the 3*l41394 7/1964 Cunmngham et a1 "355/5 X photoreceptor; adjacent to the slit and immediately Z: 2} preceding fis a charging unit to charge the phot t 3,527,523 9/1970 Travis ..350/171 orecep or e ore exposure 17 Claims, 1 Drawing Figures PA'TENTEDnm man I 3.698.807,

sum 1 or 2 I 125 I28 Fig. l. v /27 INVENTOR.

John W. Weigl BY ATTORNEYS 1. DISPLAYING AND PRINTING APPARATUS This invention relates to displaying and printing apparatus and, in particular, to apparatus for simultaneously displaying and recording graphic information In recent years, many institutions, such as government agencies, industrial corporations, educational institutions, libraries and the like, have been presented with the problem of storing and reproducing data. The amount of data, such as graphic information, accumulated by these institutions has far exceeded the capacities of available storage facilities. Accordingly, the prior art has developed various systems for efficiently and economically storing information. An example of one such data storage. system includes a digital computer and associated peripheral devices for storing digital representations of graphic information. The

digital representations are stored on magnetic media such as magnetic tape. Although this system effectively reduces many pages of documents to a few inches of magnetic tape, an attendant disadvantage therewith results from the high cost of digital machines and the requisite technical expertise essential for the operation thereof. In addition, the length of time required to reproduce a document that has previously been stored by digital techniques limits the practicability of such systems. 7

Another example of an information storage system utilizes microfilm as a recording medium. Graphic information is photographically recorded on a reduced scale. The microfilm bearing the recorded information may comprise a filmstrip, a microfiche or the like. A viewable image of the pre-recorded graphic information may be obtained by projecting a magnified image of the character patterns pre-recorded on the microfilm onto a viewing screen. Microfilm viewers and projectors presently available require a minimum of operating skill and are not economically prohibitive. In many instances, however, it is desirable to reproduce copies of the displayed image. This has been accomplished by providing separate photographic reproducing apparatus therefor. Such apparatus, however, requires a physical transfer of the microfilm from a viewer to the photographic reproducing device. Consequently, one is unable to simultaneously view the graphic information and reproduce a copy thereof. The prior art has attempted to overcome this disadvantage by providing a viewing screen and printing means at a single installation. A moveable mirror is utilized to selectively project images of pre-recorded graphic information onto the viewing screen and onto the reproducing means. Unfortunately, the selective imaging function of the moveable mirror prevents simultaneous execution of the reproducing operation and the viewing operation. Hence, an operator is precluded from observing a viewable image and utilizing the information represented thereby while a copy of the information is being produced. In addition, the employment of a mechanically moveable imaging device tends to negate simplification of the construction of the apparatus, increase manufacturing costs thereof, and necessitates stringent maintenance requirements therefor.

Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide apparatus for simultaneously displaying and recording graphic information.

It is another object of the present invention to provide apparatus for displaying a viewable image of prerecorded information and for electrophotographically reproducing copies of said pre-recorded information.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide apparatus employing a stationary image splitting means for simultaneously displaying and printing information recorded on microfilm.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide apparatus for spectrally separating modulated radiant energy whereby graphic information corresponding to the modulations are simultaneously displayed and recorded.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide simplified apparatus admitting of high reliability for simultaneously displaying and printing images of graphic information.

Various other objectsand advantages of the invention will become clear from the following detailed description of an exemplary embodiment thereof, and the novel features will be particularly pointed out in connection with the appended claims.

In accordance with this invention, apparatus for simultaneously displaying and recording graphic information is provided wherein images of character patterns corresponding to said graphic information are projected; image splitting means optically receives the projected images of said character patterns and establishes first and second contemporaneous optical paths; image display means for displaying viewable images of character patterns is in optical communication with said image splitting means via said first optical path and photoreceptor means is in optical communication with said image splitting means via said second optical path; viewable images of the character patterns are printed in accordance with the exposure of said photoreceptor means to projected images of said character patterns.

The invention will be. more clearly understood by reference to the following detailed description of exemplary embodiments thereof in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. I is a diagrammatic view of a first embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic view of a second embodiment of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic view of a third embodiment of a portion of the apparatus of FIG. 1.

Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference numerals are used throughout, and in particular to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a projecting means 10, image splitting means 11, display means 12 and information reproducing means 13. Projecting means 10 is adapted to project images of character patterns representative of graphic information. The graphic information may comprise an original opaque document or if desired, microfilm means bearing images of information prerecorded thereon. The microfilm means may assume a conventional microfiche configuration or may comprise a filmstrip. In the exemplary embodiment illustrated herein, a strip of microfilm is adapted to be transported from supply spool 106 over guide rolls 107 and 108, normal to slit 103, over guide rolls I09 and l 10 and on to take-up spool 1 l1.

Projecting means further comprises a source of radiant energy 101, condenser lens 102 and magnifying means 104. The source of radiant energy 101 is capable of emitting light of a desired intensity and spectral distribution, and condenser lens 102 serves to conduct the light to an area of concentration disposed in the vicinity of slit 103. It is preferred that source of radiant energy 101 emit light admitting of a chromatic distribution. Magnifying means 104 may comprise at least one magnifying lens adapted to project images at a predetermined magnification ratio. It is understood that if a plurality of magnification ratios is desired, magnifying means 104 may comprise a lens assembly similar to that described in U. S. Pat. No. 3,076,392 which issued to A. J. Cerasani, et al. on Feb. 5, 1963 and assigned to Xerox Corporation.

Image splitting means 11 is fixedly disposed to prevent any significant or deleterious physical movement thereof relative to the rest of the apparatus illustrated, and is in optical communication with projecting means 10. Image splitting means 11 is adapted to establish first and second optical paths to.be traversed by radiant energy transmitted thereto by projecting means 10. A preferred embodiment of image splitting means 11 comprises an optical surface 112 coated with a thin film of various substances to form a interference filter. The reflection and transmission characteristics of the interference filter thus formed are dependent upon the particular thin film coatings of the optical surface 112. Accordingly, the interference filter is capable of selectively separating the spectral distribution of radiant energy transmitted thereto whereby a first spectral portion is reflected and a second spectral portion is transmitted. A typical interference filter may comprise an optical glass surface coated with alternate layers of magnesium fluoride having a refractive index of 1.38 and zinc sulfide having a refractive index of 2.32. The optical thickness of each coating is equal to a quarter of a wavelength at 630 millimicrons. The spectral portion of radiant energy substantially reflected by such interference filter admits of a range from approximately 520 millimicrons to approximately 750 millimicrons, and the spectral portion of radiant energy substantially transmitted by said interference filter admits of a range below 510 millimicrons. In other words, the main spectral colors reflected are green, yellow-green, yellow, orange and red; and the main spectral colors trans mitted are violet, blue and blue-green. Alternatively, films of titanium dioxide having a refractive index of 2.40 may be substituted for the zinc sulfide layers. Another type of conventional interference filter is known as a cold mirror wherein the visible portion of the spectrum is reflected thereby and the infrared portion is transmitted. Still another interference filter is comprised of two semi-transparent silver films separated by a spacer layer of magnesium fluoride. Each semi-transparent silver film may be replaced by a quarter-wave stack of five layers of dielectric films as is well known to one skilled in the art.

Alternatively, image splitting means 11 may comprise dichroic reflecting means for reflecting certain wavelengths of incident radiant energy and for transmitting other wavelengths of said incident radiant energy. Conventional dichroic reflecting means having selected spectral transmittance and reflectance characteristics are commercially manufactured by Bausch and Lomb, Incorporated and are identified by code numbers 45-1'-440 to 45-1-600 and by code numbers 45-2-44!) to 45:2-600. In addition, the QpticalCoating Laboratory, Inc. of Santa Rosa, California produces narrow band dichroic filters which transmit a portion of the ultraviolet spectrum and reflect wavelengths in the region below ultraviolet. Ultraviolet cold mirrors have been developed for reflecting ultraviolet from 270 to 400 millimicrons and for transmitting longer wavelengths; and wide band cold mirrors are available for reflecting the ultraviolet and visible regions of radiant energy while transmitting the infrared region. The foregoing cold mirrors are manufactured by the aforementioned Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc., and by Balzers, Akg., a corporation of Liechtenstein.

Display means 12 is optically coupled to said image splitting means 11 via said first optical path and is adapted to provide a viewable image of the graphic information pre-recorded on microfilm 105. Accordingly, display means 12 may comprise viewing screen means 113 such as a rear projecting screen well known in the prior art. If desired, the viewing screen means 113 may be tinted to transmit a particular spectral distribution of radiant energy to a viewer.

Information reproducing means 13 is optically coupled to image splitting means 11 via the second optical path, and is adapted to provide a printed reproduction of the graphical information recorded on microfilm 105. Accordingly, information recording means 13 may comprise photoreceptor means 114, exposure control means 116 and developing means 120. Photoreceptor means 114 may comprise a conventional electrophotographic member adapted to have an electric charge deposited thereon and to have said charge dissipated in accordance with radiant energy transmitted thereto. Photoreceptor means 114 may take the form of known electrophotographic members, such as amorphous selenium or a photoconductive pigmentbinder layer overlying a conductive support surface in belt configuration. The photoconductive binder layer may comprise for example, photoconductive selenium, cadmium sulfide or phthalocyanine in a plastic binder. Alternatively, photoreceptor means 114 may comprise other well-known compositions to be further described hereinbelow.

Exposure control means 116 comprises a slit in opaque material 117. Opaque material 117 is adapted to be displaced in a linear direction with respect to photoreceptor means 114 so that slit 116 successively scans the surface of said photoreceptor means. Thus, it is seen that photoreceptor means 114 is shielded from modulated radiant energy transmitted thereto except for discrete areas thereof that are successively exposed by the traversing slit 116. If desired, a conventional optical cutoff filter may be inserted into slit 116 to improve the spectral contrast of the transmitted radiant energy. Opaque material 117 may be of rigid construction adapted for reciprocal motion. Alternatively, opaque material 117 may be of flexible construction and transported from supply spool 118 to take-up spool 119 as illustrated in the drawing. Charging unit is mounted on opaque material 1 17 in preceding relationship with respect to slit 116. The charging unit 115 is adapted to deposit an electric charge on the surface of photoreceptor means 114 and may comprise a corona discharge device of the type described in U. S. Pat. No. 2,777,957 issued to L. E. Walkup and assigned to Xerox Corporation.

Developing means 120 may comprise any wellknown form of electrophotographic developing apparatus which acts to develop an electrostatic latent image by the application of electroscopic material capable of adhering to the electrostatic charge pattern on photoreceptor means 114. The nature and composition of the electroscopic material which may include solid or liquid toner, is well known in the art as is the manner in which an electrostatic latent image is treated with such material. A more complete description thereof may be found in U. S. Pat. No. 2,885,955 issued to R. G. Vyverberg and assigned to Xerox Corporation, and in U. S. Pat. No. 3,084,043 issued to R. W. Gundlach and assigned to Xerox Corporation. Developing means 120 may include magnetic brush developing means, well known to those skilled in the xero graphic developing art. It is noted that developing means 120 may include means, it desired, whereby the polarity of an electrostatic latent image may be changed so that the image may be directly developed to form an electrophotographic print corresponding to a photographic reversal of the original exposure. Such means are well known and described in U. S. Pat. No. 2,817,765 issued to R. E. l-layford et al. It is understood that .if photoreceptor means 114 comprises electrophotographic means such as an endless belt of photoconducting binder layer supported by a surface, the electrophotographic means may be transported to developing means 120 by conventional driving means.

The developed electrostatic latent images on photoreceptor means 114 must be transferred to a support surface to obtain a final copy, and photoreceptor means 114 may be prepared for reuse. Accordingly, a transfer station 128 may be provided, which transfer station comprises a print receiving surface 125 deployed around drive rollers 126 and 127 and positioned so that a surface portion thereof is contiguous with a portion of photoreceptor means 114. Print receiving surface 125 may be paper, glass, plastic or any surface upon which it is desired to print characters and may comprise a web or individual pre-cut sheets. Developed images are transferred to print receiving surface 125 from photoreceptor means 114 in a wellknown manner. Once the electroscopic material is transferred to print receiving surface 125, it may be fixed by passing print receiving surface 125 through a heating chamber (not shown). A cleaning station 129 is provided to remove any electroscopic material adhering to photoreceptor means 114 subsequent to the transfer of the image at transfer station 128, if photoreceptor means 114 admits of endless belt configuration. The cleaning station 129 may be of the type described in U. S. Pat. No. 2,751,616 issued to M. l. Turner, Jr. et al. and assigned to Xerox Corporation. It is, of course, understood, that a cleaning station is unnecessary if photoreceptor means 114 admits of a disposable belt configuration.

The operation of the present embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1 will now be described. The radiant energy emitted by lamp means 101 and conducted to slit 103 by condenser lens 102 is modulated by character patterns corresponding to the graphic information prerecorded on a frame of microfilm 105. The radiant energy thus modulated is transmitted by magnifying lens means 104. Image splitting means 11 is interposed between the magnifying lens means 104 and the focal plane of said magnifying lens means. The spectral distribution of the modulated radiant energy is separated by image splitting means 11 such that radiant energy reflected thereby admits of a first spectral portion and the radiant energy transmitted thereby admits of a second spectral portion. It is usually provided that the intensity of the reflected radiant energy exceeds the intensity of the transmitted radiant energy.

Display means 12 is disposed such that the optical path traversed by radiant energy from magnifying lens means 104 to image splitting means 11, and from image splitting means 11 to display means 12 is effectively equal to the focal length of magnifying lens means 104. Hence, viewing screen 113 provides a viewable magnified image of the graphic information pre-recorded on microfilm in response to the modulated radiant energy impinging thereon.

If a viewer desires to produce a printed record of the image displayed by viewing screen 113, he need only activate a circuit completing switch (not shown) which enables the following to occur. Opaque material 117 is translated in the direction shown by arrow A such that charging means 115 uniformly deposits an electrical charge on the surface of photoreceptor means 114; and slit 116 regulates the dissipation of said electric charge by successively exposing discrete areas of photoreceptor means 114 to the modulated radiant energy imaged thereat. The photosensitivity of photoreceptor means 114 is sufficient such that the intensity of the radiant energy transmitted thereto need not be high. The resulting electrostatic latent image of the character patterns corresponding to the graphic information prerecorded on a frame of microfilm 105 is developed by transporting photoreceptor means 114 to developing means 120 in the conventional manner. If photoreceptor means 114 comprises an endless belt of reuseable photoconductive insulating means, the image developed by developing means 120 is transferred to print receiving surface at transfer station 128. Accordingly, print receiving surface 125 corresponds to the final printed copy of graphic information prerecorded on microfilm 105 and photoreceptor means 114 is translated to cleaning means 129 whereat the photoreceptor means is prepared for reuse. Conversely, if photoreceptor means 114 comprises a disposable belt of photoconductive means, the photoreceptor means 114 is discarded subsequent to the transfer of the developed image to print receiving surface 125.

If image splitting means 11 comprises interference filter means, the special distribution of the radiant energy reflected by the interference filter means will be distinct from the spectral distribution of the radiant energy transmitted by said interference filter means. The interference filter means may be particularly chosen whereby radiant energy corresponding to blue, green and yellow wavelengths are reflected to viewing screen 113 and radiant energy corresponding to red, and near infrared wavelengths are transmitted to photoreceptor means 114. This spectral separation is advantageous because the radiant energy reflected to the viewing screen 113 admits of a chromatic distribution centered about the green region of the spectrum to which the human eye is most sensitive. In addition, photoreceptor means 114 may comprise an endless phthalocyanine binder coated belt which exhibits a maximum value of spectral sensitivity to red and near infrared wavelengths, or a disposable belt of phthalocyanine binder paper. In addition, it should be apparent that the chromatic aberration inherently associated with magnifying lens means 104 may be facilely corrected by disposing photoreceptor means 114 in the focal plane of magnifying lens means 104 associated with wavelengths corresponding to the red region and by disposing viewing screen 113 at the focal length of magnifying lens means 104 associated with the wavelengths corresponding to the blue region. It is, of course, understood that photoreceptor means 114 may include other photosensitive material exhibiting a maximum value of spectral sensitivity to the wavelengths of the radiant energy selectively transmitted by the image splitting means 11, as will be described further hereinbelow.

If image splitting means 11 comprises dichroic reflecting means, the spectral distribution of the radiant energy incident thereon will be divided into first and second spectral portions. The first spectral portion of radiant energy is reflected by the dichroic reflecting means to viewing screen 113 and the second spectral portion of radiant energy is transmitted by said dichroic reflecting means to the photoreceptor means 114. The chromatic distribution of the reflected and transmitted radiant energy is dependent upon the particular composition of the dichroic reflecting means employed herein. It is of course preferred to provide photoreceptor means 114 with photoconducting material having a photosensitivity characteristic corresponding to the spectral transmission characteristic of the particular dichroic reflecting means adopted. Stated otherwise, the photoconducting material should exhibit a maximum value of spectral sensitivity to the spectral portion of radiant energy communicated thereto by the dichroic reflecting means. Although the photosensitivity characteristic of the viewing screen 113 is not critical per se, the viewing screen should respond to the spectral portion of radiant energy reflected thereto such that the viewable image to which the human eye is most sensitive is displayed.

Although one application of the present invention has thus far been described with reference to the specific embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1, it is not strictly limited thereto. For example, image splitting means 11 may comprise interference filter means or dichroic reflecting means adapted to transmit radiant energy to viewing screen 113 and to reflect radiant energy to photoreceptor means 114. In addition, lamp means 101 may emit substantially white light, or the light emitted thereby may exhibit a relatively limited chromatic distribution. Further, the image displayed by viewing screen 113 preferably admits of the same optical polarity as that of the printed image. Accordingly, it may be observed that the inherent optical characteristics of magnifying lens means 104 results in a reversal of the projected image of the graphic information pre-recorded on microfilm 105. Reflection from image splitting means 11 causes a further reversal of the polarity of the projected image. If viewing screen 113 comprises a rear projection screen, the optical polarity of the viewable image displayed thereby is again reversed so that an observer perceives an image reversed in polarity with respect to the graphic information pre-recorded on microfilm 105. It is understood, however, that the image projected to photoreceptor means 114 by magnifying lens means 104 is not subjected to further reversals. Hence, the optical polarityof the image developed by developing means 120 is reversed with respect to the graphic information pre-recorded on microfilm 105 and,'therefore, is equal to the optical polarity of the viewable image displayed by viewing screen 113. When the image developed by developing means is transferred to print receiving surface 125, image reversal occurs. Accordingly, the optical polarity of the printed image reproduced on print receiving surface is equal to the optical polarity of the graphic information pre-recorded on microfilm 105. In this latter configuration, an additional reflecting surface (not shown) may be interposed between image splitting means 11 and viewing screen 113 to provide a further reversal of the image reflected to the viewing screen 113. Accordingly, the optical polarity of the viewable image thus displayed by viewing screen 113 would be equal to the optical polarity of the printed image recorded on print receiving surface 125. It is understood that if viewing screen 113 comprises a front projection screen, one skilled in the art may utilize additional image reversing devices to obtain the desired polarities of viewable and printed images.

Referring now to FIG. 2 there is illustrated another embodiment of information reproducing means 13 that may be utilized in accordance with the present invention, comprising photoconducting means 214, such as light-sensitive copy paper, transport means 215 and developing means 220. The light-sensitive copy paper 214 may comprise a photoconductive zinc oxide surface coating on a pre-cut sheet of paper, one example of which is commercially known as Electrofax paper and available from RCA. The light-sensitive paper 214 overlies transport means 215 and is adapted to be transported thereby. Transport means 215 is comprised of an endless belt of electrically-conductive rubber deployed about rollers 216 and 217 and electrically connected to a reference potential. The light-sensitive paper 214 is capable of being transported to the position illustrated whereupon the aforedescribed charging unit 115 is capable of depositing an electric charge on the surface of light-sensitive paper 214 and traversing slit 116 exposes discrete areas of the charged surface to the modulated radiant energy communicated thereto by image splitting means 112 in the manner described hereinabove. Subsequent to the exposure thereof, lightsensitive paper 214 is transported to developing means 220 by transport means 215. The developing means 220 is adapted to develop the latent image on light-sensitive paper 214 and may comprise conventional electrophotographic developing means such as the liquid developing means disclosed in U. S. Pat. No. 3,155,546 which issued to J. F. Dirks.

The light-sensitive paper 214 may comprise unsensitized or blue-violet sensitized zinc oxide paper having a maximum spectral sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation.

- Accordingly, image splitti ng means 112 should be 113. In this configuration, image splitting means 112 may typically comprise an ultraviolet cold mirror for reflecting ultraviolet radiant energy and for transmitting visible radiant energy.

It is recalled that the projected image transmitted by image splitting means 112 exhibits a polarity reversal with respect to the pre-recorded graphic information, and the projected image reflected by image splitting means 112 admits of the same polarity as the prerecorded graphic information. Hence, both the image developed on light-sensitive paper 214 by developing means 220 and the image displayed on a rear projection screen configuration of viewing screen means 113 are of reversed polarity. Similarly, if the relative positions of light-sensitive paper 214 and rear projection screen 113 are interchanged, the image developed by developing means 220 and the image displayed on the rear projection screen 113 each exhibit a polarity corresponding to that of the pre-recorded graphic information. 3

FIG. 3 illustrates a further embodiment of information reproducing means 13 and comprises photosensitive copy paper 314, transport means 315 and image developing means 320. In the illustrated configuration, photosensitive copy paper 314 is in optical communication with image splitting means 112 via a reflecting optical path and viewing screen means 113 is in optical communication with image splitting means 112 via a transmitting optical path. The photosensitive copy paper 314 may comprise a sheet of photoconductive zinc oxide coated copy paper, a sheet of titanium dioxide coated copy paper, a sheet of silver halide photographic paper or a combination of light-sensitive and heat-sensitive material. Each of the foregoing examples of photosensitive copy paper 314 exhibits a maximum spectral sensitivity to ultraviolet, violet or blue radiation. Accordingly, image splitting means 112 should be particularly adapted to reflect the spectral portion of radiant energy defining the range from ultraviolet to blue and to transmit the visible spectral portion of radiant energy. It is recalled that a typical example of image splitting means 112 may thus comprise an ultraviolet cold mirror. Of course, the photosensitive copy paper 314 may be treated with conventional spectrally sensitizing dyes to modify the spectral sensitivity of said copy paper.

Transport means 315 may comprise a conventional conveyor belt means or the like for transporting photosensitive copy paper 314 from a supply of copy paper to each operating station of the information reproducing means. The transport means 315 may include a sheet support means 316, if desired. When the photosensitive copy paper 314 is transported to the exposure station illustrated in FIG. 3, traversing slit 116 exposes discrete areas of the surface of the copy paper to the modulated radiant energy communicated thereto by image splitting means 112 in the manner previously described. It is noted that in the illustrated configuration, opaque material 117 does not include the aforedescribed charging station 115 mounted thereon. ()ne skilled in the art will recognize that a charging station would not be necessary if the photosensitive copy paper 314 is not photoconduetive. If, however, the copy paper 314 is photoconductive, a conventional charging station may be provided.

Subsequent to the exposure of the photosensitive copy paper 314, transport means 315 transports the copy paper to image developing means 320 whereat the latent image is developed. If the photosensitive copy paper 314 comprises a sheet of zinc oxide coated copy paper, developing means 320 may include an electrolytic developer solution as described in U. S. Pat. No. 3,072,541 which issued to B. L. Shely, et al. Alternatively, if the photosensitive copy paper 314 comprises a sheet of titanium dioxide coated copy paper, developing means 320 may include a solution of silver nitrate. And if the photosensitive copy paper 314 comprises a combination of light-sensitive and heat-sensitive material, developing means 320 may include a heating chamber for the dry development of the latent image, as described in U. S. Pat. No. 3,457,075 which issued to D. A. Morgan et al.

Still another embodiment of information reproducing means 13 may comprise a rolling drum comprised of photoreceptor means. The circumference of the drum may be at least equal to the length of the copy to be reproduced, and the axial dimension of the drum may be at least equal to the width of the copy to be reproduced. Accordingly, discrete areas, longitudinally disposed on the surface of the drum, will be successively exposed to modulated radiant energy communicated thereto as the drum is rolled. The surface of the drum may be shielded from extraneous light by a laterally displaceable housing including a longitudinal slit which functions as the aforedescribed traversing slit 116. Thus, when the drum undergoes one complete rotation, it is displaced from a first boundary of the projected image to an opposite boundary of the projected image, thereby forming a latent image on the surface of the drum. If the surface of the drum includesconventional xerographic photoconducting means such as selenium, cadmium sulfide, phthalocyanine, or the like, electrophotographic developing means and a transfer station are provided to produce a final copy of the prerecorded graphic information. If photosensitive copy paper, such as copy paper coated with zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, silver halide or the like, is wrapped about the drum, image developing means similar to that described above may be employed to develop the latent image on the copy paper.

It should be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that the instant invention admits of a plurality of alterations and modifications which in no way change the basic teachings thereof. For instance, the character patterns corresponding to the graphic information may be pre-recorded on an opaque medium. In this configuration, radiant energy may be propagated toward the character patterns and reflected therefrom to magnifying lens means 104. Auxiliary image reversing optical elements may be expediently provided in appropriate optical paths to alter the optical polarity of the viewable image displayed by display means 12 and the printed image recorded by recording means 13 as desired.

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to a specific embodiment thereof it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the foregoing and various other changes and modifications in forms and details may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is therefore intended that the appended claims be interpreted as including all such changes and modifications.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for simultaneously displaying and printing character patterns,comprising:

means for projecting a spectral distribution of radiant energy along a first optical path;

spectrum separating means optically coupled to said projecting means for separating said spectral distribution of radiant energy into a first spectral portion transmitted along said first optical path and a second spectral portion simultaneously transmitted along a second optical path;

graphic information means for modulating the radiant energy applied to said spectrum separating means with character patterns;

display means in optical communication with said spectrum separating means and interposed in one of said first and second optical paths for receiving a corresponding one of said first and second spectral portions of radiant energy to provide a viewable image of the modulated radiant energy received by display means;

photoreceptor means in optical communication with said spectrum separating means and interposed in the other of said first and second optical paths and adapted to receive a corresponding one of said first and second spectral portions of radiant enery;

moveable means overlying said photoreceptor means for depositing a uniform layer of electric charge on the surface of said photoreceptor means and for successively exposing discrete areas of said photoreceptor means to said corresponding one of said first and second spectral portions of radiant energy to selectively dissipate said electric charge; and

means for printing viewable images corresponding to said selectively dissipated electric charge.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said spectrum separating means comprises interference filter means such that said second spectral portion of radiant energy substantially corresponds to the spectral sensitivity characteristic of said photoreceptor means.

3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said display means comprises a viewing screen.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said photoreceptor means comprises electrophotographic means such that said selectively dissipated electric charge forms electrostatic latent images of said character patterns, said electrophotographic means exhibiting a maximum value of spectral sensitivity in the spectral interval defined by said spectral portion of radiant energy received thereby.

5. The apparatus of claim 4 wherein said printing means comprises developing means for developing said electrostatic latent image.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said character pattern means comprises:

graphic information recorded on microfilm means;

and

magnifying means adapted to project a magnified image of said graphic information.

7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said spectrum separating means comprises dichroic reflecting means for reflecting along said second optical path a portion of the spectrum of radiant energy communicated thereto and for transmitting along said first optical path a portion of the spectrum of radiant energy communicated thereto.

8. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein 'said display means comprises rear projection screen means adapted to receive a projected image of said character patterns.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said photoreceptor means comprises photoconductive means having maximum spectrum sensitivity to said transmitted portion of radiant energy whereby said selectively dissipated electric charge forms electrostatic latent images of said character patterns.

10. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein said photoconductive means includes a support surface having a coating of phthalocyanine.

11. The apparatus of claim 9 wherein said printing means comprises developing means for developing said electrostatic latent image and transfer means for transferring said developed images from said photoconductive means to a surface.

12. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein said character pattern means comprises microfilm means having character patterns recorded thereon and projecting means including magnifying means for projecting mag nified images of said character patterns.

13. A combination viewing and reproducing system, comprising:

means for providing a beam of light;

dichroic mirror means in optical communication with said providing means for reflecting certain wavelengths of light includable in said beam of light and for transmitting other wavelengths of light includable in said beam of light;

graphic means optically interposed between said providing means and said dichroic mirror means for modulating said beam of light in accordance with information represented by said graphic means;

viewing means optically coupled to said dichroic mirror means and responsive to said reflected light for providing a viewable image of the information represented by said graphic means;

light-sensitive means optically coupled to said dichroic mirror means and adapted to be exposed to said transmitted light; said light-sensitive means having a photosensitivity characteristic corresponding to the spectral transmission characteristic of said dichroic mirror means such that said light-sensitive means is particularly sensitive to the wavelengths of light transmitted by said dichroic mirror means to form latent images of the information modulated beam of light;

exposure control means for scanning the surface of said lightlsensitive means such that discrete areas of said light-sensitive means are successively exposed to said transmitted light in accordance with the scanning of said surface; and

means for printing a viewable image of the information represented by said graphic means in accordance with the exposure of said light-sensitive means.

14. A combination viewing and reproducing system in accordance with claim 13 wherein said means for printing comprises means for developing said latent images.

15. A combination viewing and reproducing system in accordance with claim 14 wherein said light-sensitive means comprises photoconductive means adapted 14 to have a charge deposited thereon, and to have said charge dissipated in accordance with the exposure thereof to said transmitted light such that said latent images are electrostatic latent images.

16. A combination viewing and reproducing system in accordance with claim 14 wherein said graphic means comprises microfilm means having information pre-recorded thereon and magnifying means for projecting magnified images of said pre-recorded information.

17. A combination viewing and reproducing system in accordance with claim 16 wherein said viewing means comprises rear projecting screen means adapted to receive said magnified images.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3951541 *Sep 14, 1973Apr 20, 1976Coulter Information Systems, Inc.Duplicator processor
US3988064 *Oct 31, 1974Oct 26, 1976Canon Kabushiki KaishaReader-printer
US4008956 *Mar 24, 1975Feb 22, 1977Xerox CorporationDocument handling system for pre-collation copying
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Classifications
U.S. Classification355/45, 399/206
International ClassificationG03G15/00, G03B13/18, G03G15/22, G03B13/28, G03B27/465
Cooperative ClassificationG03G15/223, G03B27/465, G03B13/28
European ClassificationG03B13/28, G03G15/22A2, G03B27/465
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 6, 1998ASAssignment
Owner name: CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT, THE
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:CONMED CORPORATION (NY CORPORATION);ASPEN LABORATORIES, INC. (CO CORPORATION);CONMED ANDOVER MEDICAL, INC. (NY CORPORATION);AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:009187/0010
Effective date: 19971231