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Publication numberUS3699603 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1972
Filing dateFeb 26, 1971
Priority dateFeb 26, 1971
Also published asCA926566A1, DE2148799A1
Publication numberUS 3699603 A, US 3699603A, US-A-3699603, US3699603 A, US3699603A
InventorsPopeil Samuel J
Original AssigneePopeil Brothers
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Wringer mop
US 3699603 A
Abstract
A wringer mop is disclosed in which the mop head, a sponge encased in a cloth sleeve, is cantileverally mounted on a rotatable wringer shaft. A U-shaped mop head mount supports a rotatable wringer shaft which is actuated by a crank which, in the inoperative position, permits the entire mop to be inserted into a water container without interference from the crank. Spools at both ends of the mop head are slotted so that the mop head can flip-flop backwardly and forwardly thereby permitting both sides to be worked. Additional slots are provided to secure the mop head against rotation on the cantilever wringer arm in a position approximately perpendicular with the mop handle facilitating the use of the mop, and more particularly its offset mop head, to clean the tops of doors, window sills, valances, and the like.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Popeil [54] WRINGER MOP Samuel J. Popeil, Chicago, 111.

[73] Assignee: Popeil Brothers, Inc., Chicago, Ill.

[22] Filed: Feb. 26, 1971 [21] Appl. No.: 119,160

[72] Inventor:

[52] US. Cl. ..15/120 R, 15/144 R, 15/244 A [51] Int. Cl. ..A47l 13/142 [58] Field ofSearch ..l5/98, 116 R, 116 A, 119 A,

15/120 R, 120 A, 244 A 5] Oct. 24, 1972 Primary Examiner-Daniel Blum Attorney-Dominik, Knechtel & Godula [57] ABSTRACT A wringer mop is disclosed in which the mop head, a sponge encased in a cloth sleeve, is cantileverally mounted on a rotatable wringer shaft. A U-shaped mop head mount supports a rotatable wringer shaft which is actuated by a crank which, in the inoperative positiompermits the entire mop to be inserted into a water container without interference from the crank. Spools at both ends of the mop head are slotted so that the mop head can flip-flop backwardly and forwardly thereby permitting both sides to be worked. Additional slots are provided to secure the mop head against rotation on the cantilever wringer arm in a position approximately perpendicular with the mop handle facilitating the use of the mop, and more particularly its ofi'set mop head, to clean the tops of doors, window sills, valances, and the like.

15 Claims, 27 Drawing Figures PATENTEUncI 24 m2 SHEET 1 BF 6 20 M m E III -HIElHiIII 4; FIG. 2 Q

INVENTOR Samqe/ J. Popei/ ATTYS.

PATENTEDum 24 972 7 SHEET 2 0F 6 INVENTOR Samuel J. Pope/l SHEET 3 BF 6 J w Wm ATTYS PATENTEDncI 24 I972 PATENTED 0m 24 1912' SHEET l [1F 6 FIG. 12

7 FIG. 10

FIG. 11

FIG. 13

INVENTOR Samuel J. Popeil BY 90M013 //2M4 ATT'YS .d M Mm MP 4 S W I T m [WA v vm SHEEI 5 BF 6 FIG. 20

PATENTEI] um 24 I972 FIG. 19

WRINGER MOP BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The field of the invention relates towringer mops, and more particularly that type of wringer mop in which the wringing mechanism includes a crank as a part of the mop head support structure. A removable mop head is provided formed from a sponge block encased in a sleeve of fabric.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART The prior art is exemplified by US. Pat. No. 2,873,462 in which the mop head is wrung out by compressing axially. The construction shown in US. Pat No. 2,873,462 will not permit an uninterrupted cantilevered support of the mop head and thus blocks the accessibility to flat surfaces at a higher elevation than the user such asdoor tops. Wringer mops having sponge like water-absorbing portions which are rotated are exemplified in US. Pat. No. 2,955,309. This type construction, however, presupposes laterally extending mop portions, and when used on the floor, leaves a streak in the middle between the mop heads.

Finally, sponge mops abound in the prior art such as exemplified by US. Pat. Nos, 2,685,098 and 2,961,676, but squeeze type sponge constructions suffer from many disadvantages. Streaks are left on a composition floor by a cellular mop head. Additionally, the wringing type construction precludes the presentation of a low silhouette for accessibility underneath modern style furniture in which the space between the furniture base and the floor is often restricted. Finally, almost all of the self wringing sponge mops compress sponge against sponge, or a clamp in wringing. Thus, the dirt on the face of the sponge is clamped in place and when the mop is used again it is not clean.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION The invention relates to a cantilever wringer mop construction having a U-shaped mop head mount and demountable handle. A rotatable wringer shaft is journalled in one leg of the U-shaped mop head. A crank is provided at one end of the rotatable wringer shaft, and is employed to wring the water from the mop head which is a sponge like rectangular block encased in a tubular sleeve of cloth. In a typical commercial embodiment the mop head will absorb over one pint of water, and yet express by wringing almost 90 percent of the water from the mop head. Conversely, the mop head can absorb a relatively large quantity of water on a wet floor.

A broad object of the present invention is to reduce the work effort required to mop because:

a. the mop holds and absorbs more fluids and therefore can dissipate or absorb the fluids over a larger surface area without being refilled or wring dry;

b. the wringing effort is substantially reduced by providing a greater mechanical advantage to the user;

c. a larger capacity of the sponge itself provides for flushing all surfaces of the cloth, and thereby cleans the same more readily. Sponge mops of the conventional types have compressors which actually hold the dirt in place on the sponge surface rather than flushing it out.

A further object of the invention is to use cloth as the only medium which contacts the surface being washed thereby preventing the streaking associated with sponges, and other porous materials. Such a mop and head are highly effective in use on cleaning smooth shiny surfaces such as glass, glass doors, tile, marble floors, polished wooden floors and the like.

A related object flowing from the use of cloth is that it transfers large quantities of water to the sponge when the same is put into a bucket for rinsing, or altematively will assist the sponge in picking up large quantities of moisture from a floor;

In addition, the cloth protects the sponge from repeated wrings and protects the same for cleaning in a conventional washing machine which cannot be used in cleaning out sponges of the character generally known in todays type sponge mops without undue damage.

A further important object of the invention is to provide a selflcontained wringer along with the mop so that no auxilliary equipment is necessitated.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a mop with its associated wringing structure which is very light in weight thus preventing the user from becoming overtired in cleaning a large floor area.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a mop head which has a flip-flop orientation and a fixed orientation thereby facilitating its use in various diverse cleaning projects such as cleaning the tops of a door, a door jam or valance, cleaning between venetian blind slats, washing walls, cleaning the tops of pipes and ducting, swabbing boat decks and cockpits, and getting under inaccessible narrow confines such as that beneath a Hollywood bed.

A further more detailed object of the present invention looks to the provision of a crank lock on a wringer head which locks in position for storage and also locks in a narrow silhouette configuration with relationship to the mop head to thereby provide access for narrow areas.

Still a further object of the present invention looks to the provision of a removable mop head which can be independently used for dusting, scrubbing, and the like where the mop handle will render the same inaccessible or difficult such as shelves in a bookcase, shelves in a vanity, the tile top of a vanity, and the like.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a V cloth sleeve for a sponge mop head thereby permitting the mop head a long life of repeated heavy usage and wringings which otherwise would destroy a sponge not so encased.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS Further objects and advantages, and features of the FIG. 3 is a partially diagrammatic view illustrating how the cantilever support of the mop head permits accessibility under furniture having a narrow access area between the base of the furniture and the floor upon which it is positioned.

FIG. 4 is a partially diagrammatic view illustrating how the wringer mop in the configuration particularly as shown in FIG. 2 can be employed to clean the tops of doors, window ledges, and other heretofore relatively inaccessible areas.

FIG. 5 is a top elevation of the mop head partially diagrammatically illustrating how the crank is employed to wring or express the moisture from the mop head.

FIG. 6 is a plan view of the mop head support, mop head, and cantilever rotatable wringer shaft illustrating the principal structural relationships involved in removably securing the mop head to the mop head support.

FIG. 7 is an end view of the mop head and support in the same scale as FIG. 6.

FIG. 8 is a transverse sectional view through the mop head taken along section line 8-8 of FIG. 6 illustrating particularly the relationship between the rotatable wringer shaft and the flip-flop mounting means at the anchor spool end of the rotatable wringer shaft.

FIG. 9 is a transverse sectional enlarged partially brokenview of the mop head where it engages the wringer spool end of the rotatable wringer shaft taken along section line 99 of FIG. 6, and showing the mop head in its fixed perpendicular relationship with the support.

FIG. 10 is a plan view of the U-shaped head mount which receives the rotatable wringer shaft.

FIG. 11 is an end view of the U-shaped head mount shown in FIG. 10in the same scale as FIG. 10.

FIG. 12 is a view of the opposite end of the U-shaped head mount shown in plan view in FIG. 10 taken from the opposite end of that illustrated in FIG. 1 1.

FIG. 13 is an end view of the mop handle mounting end ,of the U-shaped head mount viewed from line l3 13 of FIG. 10 in the same scale as shown therein,

FIG. 14 is a plan view of the wringer crank.

FIG 15 is a side view of the wringer crank in the same scale as the plan view of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is a rear view of the wringer crank shown in FIGS. 14 and 15 in the same scale thereof.

FIG. 17 is a front elevated view of the wringer crank handle and handle shaft.

FIG. 18 is an end view of the wringer crank handle.

FIG. 19 is a plan view of the retraction spring for the wringer crank handle.

FIG. 20 is a transverse broken sectional view taken along line 20-20 of FIG. 7 showing in enlarged scale the relationship between the wringer crank, handle, and retraction spring.

FIG. 21 is a plan-view of the wringer shaft.

FIG. 22 is an end view of the wringer shaft taken from the wringer crank mounting portion thereof.

FIG. 23 is a front elevation in enlarged scale of the mop head wringer spool snap fastener.

FIG. 24 is an end view of the mop head wringer spool snap fastener taken from the slotted end thereof.

FIG. 25 is an end view of the mop head wringer spool assembly taken from the opposite end shown in FIG. 24.

FIG. 26 is a top view of the mop head wringer spool snap fastener.

FIG. 27 is a partially broken enlarged sectional view of the anchor shaft, wringer shaft support and wringer snap assembly taken generally at area 2727 of FIG. 6.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT Referring now to the drawings, it will be seen that the wringer mop 10 as illustrated in FIG. 1, includes a mop head 20 secured to the mop head mount 12. The normal positions of the handle 11 with relation to the flat surfaces of the mop head 20 are illustrated angularly in FIG. 1. Additionally, however, by securing the mop head 20 on an alternative position on the mop head support 12, the mop head 20 can be positioned in a generally perpendicular relationship with the handle as shown in FIG. 2. The advantages of these two positions are also illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4 where it will be seen in FIG. 3 that the mop head 20 can, because it is 7 supported cantileverally with regard to the demountable handle 11 and mop head support 12, be inserted beneath furniture such as a bed or a sofa, particularly in a recreation room having a composition floor. Additionally, as shown in phantom lines at the bottom of FIG. 1, when the relationship between the mop head and handle is generally parallel, the mop handle 1 l permits the insertion of the mop head 20 well beneath low clearance furniture.

One outstanding advantage and feature of the mop 10 is the offset clearance provided between the handle 1 1 and the free end of the mop head 20. When the mop head 20 is positioned generally perpendicular to the handle 11, this additional offset clearance permits the wringer mop 10 illustrative of the present invention to easily clean the top of a door 22 such as shown in FIG. 4. Additionally, the rectangular mop head can be used to clean the tops of household locations having difficult access, such as the top of valances, pipes, and heating ducts. Also, office locations, such as the top of the transom 24, as illustrated in FIG. 4, can be easily cleaned. It will be additionally appreciated that in basement recreation rooms window sills are often above head height, but they can be readily cleaned with the subject wringer mop 10 in much the same fashion as the illustration reveals regarding the cleaning of the top of the door 22. The same holds true with the tops of picture frames and many lighting fixtures.

With the conventional sponge mops of the prior art, the sponge is generally secured to a backing material and then to the mop head. Thus one face of the mop is blocked by the mop head support so that the floor or flat surface can be engaged effectively by only one face of the mop head. With a wringer mop as illustrative of the present invention, all four faces of the rectangular mop head 20 can be used at various times to perform their cleaning functions. This efficient mop head thus facilitates left hand and right hand usage, as well as access to heretofore virtually inaccessible locations with a hand mop. Also increased is the time the map can be used and the space cleaned before the mop head 20 requires cleaning.

In connection with cleaning the mop head 20, it is so constructed that it can be quickly removed and tossed into the ordinary home automatic washing machine along with other cleaning cloths, and washed and ready for reuse. Other sponge mops having various configurations of backing material cannot be so cleaned because the backing material will be destroyed in the washing operation. Additionally, exposed sponge material is susceptible of rapid degradation and deterioration by agitation. The mop head 20 of the subject wringer mop is comprised of a block of sponge material 52 encased by a mop head cloth sleeve 40 (See FIG. 6). This construction of the wringer mop 10 reduces this tendency and thereby greatly extends the life of the mop, in addition to providing the necessary capillary action to quickly suck up water off the floor, or alternatively quickly fill the mop head with water for wet mopping.

The wringing action of the mop 10 is shown diagrammatically in FIG. 5. The user holds the base leg hand grip 19, extends the wringer handle 18, and turns the wringer crank 16 as shown in dotted lines. As the wringer assembly rotates the wringer shaft 25 (See FIG. 6) transmits the rotation to the outer end of the mop head twisting the mop head 20 as shown in FIG. 5 and squeezing the water out. It has been found,

however, depending upon the individual that some people instinctively want to hold the mop 10 by the handle 11 when wringing. For such persons, the mop handle mount grip 17 is provided as an extension of the base leg hand grip 19 at the head mount 12.

More specific details of the wringer mop 10 will be seen in their assembled relationship in FIG. 6. There it will be seen that the handle grip 17 forms the handle recess 14 which engages and retains the tubular handle 11. Preferably, this tubular handle 11 has a non-circular cross section complementary with the cross section of the handle recess 14 to prevent relative twisting. The spacer beam 21 of the U-shaped head mount 12 is perpendicular to the axis of the base leg hand grip 19 as well as the wringer shaft 25 and its associated support and journal means 28. The spacer beam 21 is configured to receive in close approximate relationship the wringer 15 and more particularly the wringer crank 16, the wringer crank handle 18 being shown in its retracted locked position secured interiorly of the one end portion of the base leg hand grip 19. The wringer crank 16 receives the hexagonal end 46 of the wringer shaft 25 press-fitted into a hexagonal shaft pocket 56 of the wringer crank handle collar 55. The wringer shaft 25 is journaled within the wringer shaft support 28 of the head mount 12. A bore 29 is provided in the wringer shaft support 28 in order to joumalingly engage the wringer shaft 25. Additionally, anchor flanges 30 are provided in a diametrically opposed position on the wringer shaft support 28 (for additional details see FIG. 10).

The mop head 20 shown in FIG. 6 has at one end an anchor spool 31 which engages the wringer shaft support 28 and its associated anchor flanges 30; at the other end a wringer spool 36 which is releasably engaged by the wringer snap assembly 35 secured to the Referring now to FIGS. Band 9, it will be seen that the anchor spool 31 has molded interiorly thereof opposed flip-flop slots 32, and opposed fixed head slots 34. As shown in FIG. 6, a row of cloth locking teeth 33 is provided to secure the mop head cloth in place by anchor spool tie 61 and wringer spool tie 62. A pair of cloth lock collars 37 in spaced relationship flank the locking teeth 33. As shown in FIG. 9, the wringer spool 36 has wringer spool flip-flop slots 38 and wringer spool fixed head slots 39 are provided to engage the wringer snap assembly as set forth hereinafter.

Referring now to FIGS. 22-25, it will be seen that the wringer snap assembly 35 includes a snap head 43 having a key slot 44 in the center portion thereof to snap actingly engage a slightly undercut snap head collar 47 (See FIG. 6) formed on the interior portion of the end of the wringer spool 36. The snap acting engagement of the snap head 43 with the snap head collar 47 of the wringer spool 36 secures the mop head longitudinally along the wringer shaft 25. To secure the same against rotation, or for limited rotation in the flip-flop configuration, snap head fins 53 are provided in a diametrically opposed position on the body of the wringer snap assembly 35, and oriented at a 90 relationship with the key slot 44 in the snap head 43. A wringer shaft bore 59 is provided interiorly of the wringer snap assembly 35, and receives the free end of the wringer shaft 25, and more particularly, its hexagonal end 45 as observed in FIG. 6. The hexagonal end 45 jammingly engages the wringer snap assembly 35 by jam fittingly engaging the wringer snap assembly bore 59 to transmit the wringing action of the wringer shaft 25 through the fin 53 of the snap head 43 to the wringer spool 36 and twist the mop to the configuration as shown in FIG. 5.

To further enhance the function of the wringer snap assembly 35 it is provided with a spacer body which extends to and abuts the wringer shaft support 28 (see FIG. 6). In this manner the hexagonal wringer shaft 25,

being a metal part, is completely shielded by a tubular exterior plastic assembly. When the metal shaft is plated, the plating resists the corrosive action of cleaning fluids. If the plating is scratched or broken, however, corrosion will accelerate at such exposed portions. By complete encasing, the likelihood of scratching or breaking the plating is significantly reduced, thus lengthening the life of the product.

An additional advantage achieved by using the spacer body 80 is to provide additional bearing support for the wringer shaft 25, and also assist in aligning the mop head 20 when attaching the same to the wringer mop 10. The additional bearing support offsets the draft action resulting from the plastic molding. It will be seen that the end of the spacer body 80 has an undercut collar 81 which overlappingly engages a shoulder 82 on the end of the wringer shaft support 28. The free end of the wringer shaft support 28 journalingly engages the wringer snap assembly at the junction of the end of the spacer body 80 and the free end of the wringer shaft support 28. At the spacer beam end of the wringer shaft support 28 a wringer crank journal cup 50 (FIGS. 10 and 12) is formed to receive and rotatably secure the wringer crank collar 55 (FIGS. 15 and 16). The wringer crank hexagonal end 46 of the wringer shaft 25 is press fitted into the hexagonal shaft pocket 56 of the wringer crank handle collar 55 thereby completing the assembly of the wringer shaft 25 to the head mount 12 components.

The spacer body 80 of the wringer snap assembly 35 also carries a continuation of the fins 53 which, as shown in FIG. 6, align themselves with the anchor flanges '30 on the wringer shaft support 28. Thus when the crank 16 is positioned in alignment with the spacer beam 21 and the handle 27 fixed, the mop head 20 may be snapped on and off quickly with the anchor spool and wringer spool properly aligned.

The flip-flop action is preselected when attaching the mop head 20 depending upon the relative position of the snap assembly fins 53 and the wringer spool flipflop slots 38 or wringer spool fixed head slots 39. The flip-flop slots 32 on the anchor spool 31, or the fixed head slots 34 are similarly engaged since they are axially aligned with their corresponding slots on the wringer spool 36. In the preferred configuration, particularly as shown in the cross sectional views of the FIGS. 8 and 9 it will be seen that the flip'flop mounting permits the mop head to rotate from a 10 oclock position to a 2 oclock position, whereas with the fixed head mounting slots in place as shown in FIG. 9, the mop head plane is approximately perpendicular with the mop head mount 12 and handle 11.

The specific relationship between the wringer handle 18 and the wringer crank 16 (shown in their details in FIGS. 14 through 20), rely significantly upon the particular configuration and mounting of the retraction spring 13 (see particularly FIG. 20). More specifically the wringer handle 18 has a handle shaft 23 and handle knob 27 which comprise the main body portion. The handle shaft 23 terminates in a nut mounting stud .64, and at the opposite end of the handle shaft 23 is an undercut handle annulus 65 which is proportioned to matingly engage the handle retraction collar 68 (see FIGS. 14 and 15) provided on the wringer crank 16. In assembled relationship, the handle shaft 23 passes interiorly of the wringer crank 16. The annulus collar bore 69 receives the shaft 23, and thereafter is secured in place by means of the spring 13 which fits within the spring recess 70 of the wringer crank 16 and the mounting nut 66 which is press fitted onto the nut mounting stud 64. The spring 13 thereby urges the knob 27 into close fitting relationship with the wringer crank 16. Specifically as noted in FIG. 6, the spring 13 and the handle shaft 23 are recessed in the tapered handle bore 71 of the head mount 12. In operation, the user grasps the knob 27 and pulls the same out of the tapered handle bore 71, and then by holding snugly against the knob 27 rotates the crank assembly 15 to squeeze the water out of the mop head 20.

To reduce weight without a corresponding sacrifice of strength both the crank 16 and spacer beam 21 of the head mount 12 are provided with a crank lattice 74 and head mount lattice 78 (see particularly FIGS. 12

- and 16). It will be further observed in FIG. 13 that the mounting effected by the handle recess 14 has an oval cross section, which provides a mop handle grip 17 for the operator. Additionally, the hand grip 19, as shown in FIGS. 10 and 11, has a modified oval shape so that it will fit comfortably and securely within the operators hand providing a firm hand grip 19 for the most efficient wringing operation.

The spacing and proportioning of the various parts is determined by their functional interaction. For example, as seen in FIG. 5 when the wringing proceeds vigorously the mop head 20 shortens. Thus the anchor spool 31 must be free to shift along the support 28, but nevertheless be positively secured against rotation. If the support 28 becomes too long, its moldability as well as strength is reduced. Considering all of the above factors, both as to the spacing of the wringer shaft collar 80, and the length of the anchor flanges 30, the approximate position of the connection between the wringer shaft support 28 and wringer snap assembly spacer body 80 (as shown in FIG. 6) is approximately one third to one-half the distance between the spacer beam 21 and the snap head 43 of the wringer snap assembly 35. e

Although particular embodiments of the invention have been shown and described in full here, thereis no intention to thereby limit the invention to the details of such embodiments. On the contrary, the invention is to cover all modifications, alternatives, embodiments, usages and equivalents of a wringer mop as fall within the spirit and scope of the invention, specification and the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A cantilever wringer mop comprising in combination,

a handle,

a U-shaped mop head mount secured to the handle having a pair of parallel legs mutually perpendicularly fixed to a base,

' a rotatable wringer shaft along one leg of the U- shaped head mount,

a spacing beam forming he base of the U-shaped mop head mount,

a journal bearing adjacent an end of said spacing beam supporting the wringer shaft,

a mop head mount base leg secured to the spacing beam at the endremote from the wringer shaft journal bearing comprising the other leg of the U- shaped mount, a

a. handle securing means extending from the base leg and substantially perpendicular therewith,

a crank secured to the wringer shaft adjacent the journal bearing and substantially parallel with the spacer beam, and

means for removably mounting a water retentive wringable mop head removably secured at one end for rotation with the wringer shaft and removablyanchored against rotation at its opposite end adjacent the spacing beam thereby defining a mop and wringer combination with an uninterrupted cantileverly supported mop head. 2. A cantilever wringer mop of of the character defined in claim 1,

wherein said first leg includes a tubular wringer shaft support fixed to the spacing beam at said bearing journal, said wringer shaft support having means to engage anchor means on the mop head against rotation, and said wringer shaft being freely rotatable within said support upon actuation of the crank. 3. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 1,

wherein anchor means on the first leg permit longitudinal adjustment along the axis of the wringer shaft of the removable mop head. 4. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 3,

wherein securing means are provided on the free end of the wringer shaft to removably secure the mop head at its removably secured one end for rotation with the wringer shaft and against longitudinal displacement therealong. 5. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 4,

wherein said anchor means are flange portions adapted to key coacting slots in coacting anchor means in said mop head, said wringer shaft having flange portions to engage slot means in coacting wringer means on said mop head, some of the slot means in each of said wringer and anchor means on said mop head being enlarged to allow said mop head to flip-flop about its longitudinal axis, and other of the slot means in each of said anchor and wringer means of said mop head being locking slots to secure mop head against rotation about its longitudinal axis. 6. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 1,

wherein means is provided in the spacing beam for immobilizing said crank in closely adjacent rela tionship with the spacing beam. 7. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 6,

wherein said means to immobilize said crank comprise a socket in said beam, a handle shaft member on said crank and slideable therethrough and engagable with said socket, spring means urging said handle shaft into said socket, and a wringer handle secured to the end of said handle shaft member serving the twofold purpose of engaging and disengaging said handle shaft and providing a revolvable hand grip for rotating the crank. 8. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 1,

wherein a hand grip surface provided on said mop head mount base leg. 9. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 1,

12. A cantilever wringer mop of the character 7 defined in claim 1,

wherein said mop head is a substantially rectangular sponge block, said mop head having an anchor spool and wringer s ool at its o p posed ends eac said spoo aving axially aligned flip-flop slots,

each said spool having axially aligned fixed head slots, said means for removably mounting including fins for engaging said slots. 13. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 1,

wherein said means for removably mounting the mop head at the spacer beam end. of the wringer shaft comprise slot and fin means thereby permitting axial movement of the mop head along the axis of the wringer shaft responsive to the natural tendency of the mop head to foreshorten upon wringing the same. 14. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 12,

wherein said means for removably mounting the anchor spool are diametrically opposed fins which permit axial movement of the mop head anchor spool along the wringer shaft to accommodate the natural tendency of the mop head to foreshorten upon wringing the same. 15. A cantilever wringer mop of the character defined in claim 1 1,

wherein hand grip means are provided on said base leg and said handle securing means thereby permitting gripping for wringing on an axis parallel to or perpendicularly with the plane of rotation of the crank.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US460656 *Oct 11, 1890Oct 6, 1891The King Mop and Wringer CompanyMop holder and wringer
US1855218 *Apr 25, 1931Apr 26, 1932Cyrill BrignoloMop holder
US2118618 *Nov 23, 1936May 24, 1938Henry Nicholson JamesWringer mop
US2668970 *Mar 8, 1949Feb 16, 1954Kenneth Cooper VirgilSelf-wringing mop
US2873462 *Sep 26, 1955Feb 17, 1959Green Emmett MAxially compressible rotatable sponge mop
US3171152 *Jun 20, 1963Mar 2, 1965Corcoran Theodore PTriangular, axially compressible sponge mop
US3616483 *Apr 13, 1970Nov 2, 1971Moulinex SaTwister type self-wringing mop
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3798700 *Aug 28, 1972Mar 26, 1974Popeil BrothersMolded mop head
US3845518 *Aug 8, 1973Nov 5, 1974Popeil BrothersMop head
US5577290 *Dec 13, 1995Nov 26, 1996Monahan; Patrick H.Wet mop with self-contained wringer
US5852842 *Dec 30, 1996Dec 29, 1998Stern Tanning Co., Inc.Floor treating device with sheepskin cover
US6098238 *Dec 29, 1998Aug 8, 2000Stern Tanning Co., Inc.Floor treating device with sheepskin cover
US6212728Dec 2, 1998Apr 10, 2001Multi-Reach, Inc.Self-wringing ratchet mop
US7281288 *Sep 26, 2003Oct 16, 2007The Hartz Mountain CorporationCleaning apparatus with flexible connection between head and handle
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/120.1, 15/144.1, 15/244.2
International ClassificationA47L13/142, A47L13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/142
European ClassificationA47L13/142