Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3699607 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1972
Filing dateJul 7, 1970
Priority dateJul 7, 1970
Also published asCA956407A1
Publication numberUS 3699607 A, US 3699607A, US-A-3699607, US3699607 A, US3699607A
InventorsPutt Frank E
Original AssigneeTown & Country Cleaners Franch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carpet cleaning apparatus
US 3699607 A
Abstract
Apparatus for cleaning floor surfaces, especially carpets, with a cylindrical brush, a plurality of fluid nozzles directed tangentially adjacent the brush near floor level, and a vacuum nozzle for retracting the fluid from the floor surface, all of which are arranged cooperatively to retract a surprisingly large percentage of the moisture from the floor surface.
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Putt 1 [541 CARPET CLEANING APPARATUS, [72] Inventor: Frank E. Putt, Hurst, Tex.

[73] Assignee: Town 8: Country Cleaners Franchises, lnc., Hurst, Tex.

22 Filed: July 7,1970

21 Appl.No.: 52,941

[52] U.S. Cl ..l5/320 [511 Int. Cl. ..A47l 7/00 [58] Field-of Search ..l5/320, 321, 322, 182, 49 C,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,801,135 4/1931 Blogg ..15/320 1,975,380 10/1934 Streich et a1 ..l5/320 Oct. 24, 1972 5/1928 Keefer; ..l5/320 3,402,420 9/ 1968 Schaffer 15/320 2,003,215 5/1935 Nadig .Q ..l5/320 1,803,693 5/1931 Cutting 1 5/320 3,344,453 10/ 1967 Price 15/50 C 2,659,921 11/1953 Osborn .Q.....15/l82 Primary Examiner-Peter Feldman Att0rneyWotford, Felsman and Falls [5 7] ABSTRACT Apparatus for cleaning floor surfaces, especially carpets, with a cylindrical brush, a plurality of fluid nozzles directed tangentially adjacent the brush near floor level, and a vacuum nozzle for retracting the fluid from the floor surface, all of which are arranged cooperatively to retract a surprisingly large percentage of the moisture from the floor surface.

15 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures PATENTEDncT 24 I972 3,699 .607

QAAJLEEEEEEEM 1 A 59 5/ NIH T,Lg|%ummmm \W .A A.

55,5557 7/- EXTRACTION TANK . 68 0 HOT WATER Ti SUPPLY PUMP W 52 4/ INVENTOR l l CARPETICLEANING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates tofloor cleaning apparatus in general, but in particular to apparatus utilizing hot water sprayed against the floor surface to be cleaned, the water thereafter being retracted with a suction nozzle and brush arrangement to an extraction tank.

2. Description of the Prior Art heating It is known in the prior art to utilize nozzles for discharging hot water against the surface of a carpet, for example, to dislodge unwanted foreign material such as dirt. Commonly, the fluid and dirt are extracted by a suction nozzle. Hot water is generated in a heating tank that includes usually an electrical heating element, and is fed to the nozzles by a pump. Moreover, the extraction tank has a fan or other vacuum generation means in its upper surface and is connected to the vacuum nozzle on the floor unit by a flexible hose. Such devices have a number of significant disadvantages, including the difficulty in withdrawing sufficient amounts of moisture from the carpet to prevent a prolonged period of moisture and excessive shrinkage in some types of carpets. Also, complete dirt and soil extraction is not always effected even though the nozzle velocity of the fluid may be high. 1

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION This invention utilizes in addition to the fluid nozzles and vacuum nozzles, a brush mounted to a frame for rotation generally about a horizontal axis. It has been discovered that the use of a brush that is too small with bristles that are too stiff damagesmany types of carpet, but on the contrary, utilization of a large brush with long bristles may produce insufficient cleansing action. The brush should, therefore, have bristles in a range from one and one-half to five inches of a composition equivalent to polyester fiber. Moreover, the speed of rotation is correlated with the bristle size such that the rotational speed lies in the range from substantially 400 to 650 r.p.m. For the purpose of improving the suction, and therefore removing greater percentages of moisture from the carpets, the cleaning apparatus preferably has a peripheral construction extending substantially to the floor level to encompass the vacuum nozzle, the fluid nozzle and the brush. In addition, an inner shield is provided around the brush and the fluid nozzle to confine the movements of the fluid that entrains the foreign particles such that they are not spread over large areas of previously cleaned carpet.

The above and other objects and advantages of the invention will become more fully apparent in the following detailed description.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a side elevation view, partially is section, illustrating carpet cleaning apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view showing the apparatus in FIG. I, principally from the bottom; and FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a preferred fluid and electrical system for generating and extracting hot water from a carpet.

2 DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT The numeral 11 in the drawing designates a frame, which in this instance is constructed of laminated fiber glass and epoxy to form the exterior of a portion of the carpet cleaning apparatus referred to as a cleaning head.

Mounted to the frame by bearings 13 (see FIG. 2) is a cylindrical brush having an interior core 15 that preferably is constructed of wood or plastic such as polyurethane. A central shaft 17 extends through the frame and into communication with bearing means 13.

Extending radially from the core 15 are a plurality of rows of polyester fibers that preferably have a diameter of 0.010 to 0.015 inches. Using bristles that are too short or too stiff has been discovered at excessive rotational speeds damages the fibers of many carpets. For this reason, the bristles of the brush should have a length in the range from one to five inches, with overall diameter of the brush being not less than about three inches. The speed of rotation of the brush should not exceed 650 r.p.m., and preferably is in a range from substantially 400 to 650 rpm. for optimum results.

As viewed in FIG. 1, the rotation of the brush should be clockwise. For rotating the brush, an electric motor 21 is mounted to a suitable support 23 and drives a pulley 25 and v-belt 27 connected with a pulley 29 carried by the shaft 17 inside the core 15 of the brush. An electrical cable 31 having a removable plug 25 engaging a socket 37 carried by the frame 11 supplies electric energy to the motor 21 through an interior conductor cable 39.

A plurality of fluid nozzles 41 are carried by the frame 11, being attached in a parallel row that is horizontal and defined by a hollow fluid conduit 43 that is in fluid communication with a conduit 45 extending upward and parallel to the handle 47 that extends obliquely and rearwardly from the apparatus. A quick disconnect coupling 49 connects a flexible hose 52 that introduces hot water to the apparatus, ultimately to the nozzles 41. The outlets of the nozzles are substantially tangential to the brush near its engagement with the floor and faces in the direction of rotation of the brush. Preferably, the angle of the axis of the nozzle with the floor surface is approximately 45. The discharge from the nozzle engages the intersection. of the brush and the floor surface as shown in FIG. 1.

11 in a narrow passage extending across the width of the apparatus, but tapering gradually along an interior region 53 to a circular cross-sectional configuration 55 for connection with a flexible vacuum hose 57. Thus,

the vacuum nozzle is adjacent the floor surface on the side of the brush opposite the fluid nozzles 41 and retracts moisture and foreign material from the carpet as the apparatus is drawn backward by the handle 47.

an additional vacuum of two inches of mercury while utilizing the same vacuum fan.

A roller 59, preferably constructed of polyurethane plastic is supported on a horizontal shaft 61 connected with the frame 1. The purpose of the roller is to support a portion of the weight of the apparatus, and preferably has adjustment levers 62 to vary its vertical position such that the spacing of the frame 11 to the floor may be conveniently varied. As shown in FIG. 3 the nozzles 41 receive hot water from a pump 64 having an electrically controlled thermostat 63 that varies the energy output from an electric energy source 65 that energizes a heating element 67 disposed in a hot water supply or tank 69. A valve 68 in a conduit 70 is opened to recirculate hot water back to the supply 69, or alternatively, is closed and valve 72 connected with flexible hose 52 opened to supply hot water to nozzles 41. The suction nozzle 51 is in fluid communication through the conduit 53, 55 and 57 with an upper portion of an extraction tank 71 that supports in its upper region a fan 73 for generating the desired vacuum.

In operation water and a cleaning compound, if desired, are placed in the hot water supply tank 69, and electrical energy supplied to the heating element 65 'from the power source 67. The thermostat 63 located inside the pump 64 communicates with hot water supplied by the pump to the fluid nozzles 41, when valve 72 is opened. When the nozzles are inactive, valve 72 may be closed and valve 68 opened to recirculate water back to hot water supply 69.

When valve 72 is opened, hot water discharges through nozzles 41 onto the carpet underneath the flex ible fibers 19 of brush, which assist in urging water and dirt from the fibers of the carpet toward the vacuum nozzle 51. From the vacuum nozzle water and dirtare urged into extraction tank 71.

Best results are obtained by pulling the apparatus rearward such that the sequence of operation is: (l) laying down a stream of hot water, (2) brushing the hot water and dirt from the carpet, and (3) retracting with the vacuum the hot water and dirt from the vacinity of the floor.

It should be apparent to those skilled in the art that I have provided an invention having significant advantages. The combination of the brush, especially when utilizing the fiber geometry and construction previously discussed, with the fluid nozzles 41 and vacuum nozzle 51 produces an exceptional apparatus for effectively cleaning floor surfaces, especially carpets. Moreover, the utilization of the exterior frame as a peripheral shell extending to floor level increases the effectiveness of the system by enabling the generation of a larger vacuum with a given size fan. In addition, the utilization of an inner shelf that surrounds the brush and the fluid nozzles increases the cleaning effectiveness by preventing foreign particles and fluid from being spread indescriminately inside the apparatus,

I While I have shown my invention in only one of its forms, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited but is susceptible to various changes and modifications without departing from the spirit thereof.

- What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for cleaning floor surfaces, especially carpet, said apparatus comprising:

a. a frame having a handle extending generally obliquely therefrom;

a generally cylindrical brush with bristles mounted to the frame to engage the floor surface for rotation about a horizontal axis that is substantially I perpendicular to said handle;

. a plurality of fluid nozzles carried by the frame in a row parallel to said horizontal axis of the brush, and located on the side of the brush wherein its bristles rotate toward the floor surface as the brush rotates with the outlets of said nozzles positioned to spray fluid toward the floor surface near the engagement of the brush with the floor;

. a vacuum nozzle carried by the frame to be positioned adjacent the floor surface and located on a side of the brush opposite said fluid nozzles for extracting fluid from the floor surface;

. power means carried by the frame and connected with the brush for rotation thereof;

f. conduit means in fluid communication with the fluid nozzles for receiving and supplying pressurized fluid thereto;

means for supplying fluid under pressure to said conduit means for spraying fluid from said nozzles.

2. The apparatus defined by claim 1 which further comprises a roller connected with the frame and engaging the floor for supporting a portion of the weight of the apparatus.

3. The apparatus defined by claim 1 which said frame comprises an exterior shell extending downward to define an exterior periphery at substantially floor surface level to increase the suction of the vacuum nozzle.

4. The apparatus defined by claim 1 which further comprises an inner shield surrounding the brush and g the fluid nozzles to confine fluid flow around the brush.

5. For use in cleaning floor surfaces, especially carpets, with apparatus that includes a hot water supply, a pump to transfer the hot water, and a vacuum means to retract the water, the combination of:

a. a frame;

b. a rotatable brush mounted to the frame to engage the floor surface while rotating about a substantially horizontal axis; v

. one or more fluid nozzles carried by the frame and located on the side of the brush wherein its bristles rotate toward the floor surface as the brush rotates, said fluid nozzles having outlets directed toward said brush and the floor surface for spraying hot fluid downward to the floor surface near the engagement of the brush with the floor surface;

. a vacuum nozzle carried by the frame on a side of the brush opposite said fluid nozzles and positioned to extend adjacent the surface of the floor;

e. a portion of said frame extending downward in the form of a peripheral shell to substantially floor level to enclose the fluid nozzles, the brush and the suction nozzles;

f. power means carried by the frame and connected with the brush for rotation thereof.

6. The apparatus defined by claim 5 which further comprises a roller connected with the frame and engaging the floor for supporting a portion of the weight of the apparatus.

7. The apparatus defined by claim 5 which'further comprises an inner shield surrounding the brush and the fluid nozzles to confine water flow around the brush.

8. For use in cleaning floor surfaces, especially carpets, with apparatus that includes a hot water supply, a pump to transfer the hot water, and a vacuum means to retract the water, the combination of:

a. a frame;

b. a rotatable brush mounted to the frame to engage the floor while rotating about a substantially horizontal axis, the brush having a diameter of at least four inches, bristles at least one to five inches long and a composition equivalent to polyester fibers, the speed of rotation being in a range of substantially 400 to 650 rpm;

c. fluid nozzles carried by the frame and located on the side of the brush wherein its bristles rotate toward the floor surface as the brush rotates, said fluid nozzles being directed to spray fluid toward the floor surface near the engagement of the brush with the floor surface;

. a vacuum nozzle carried by the frame on a side of the brush opposite said fluid nozzles and positioned to extend adjacent the floor surface;

e. power means carried by the frame and connected with the brush for rotation thereof,

9. The apparatus defined by claim 8 which further comprises a roller connected with the frame and engaging the floor for supporting a portion of the weight of the apparatus.

10. The apparatus defined by claim 8 which said frame comprises an exterior shell extending downward to define an exterior periphery at substantially floor surface level to increase the suction of the vacuum nozzle.

11. The apparatus defined by claim 8 which further comprises an inner shield surrounding the brush and the fluid nozzles to confine water flow around the brush.

12.'Apparatus for cleaning floor surfaces, especially carpets, comprising:

a frame having a front end and a handle extending from a back end thereof;

a brush mounted to engage the floor surface for rotation about a generally horizontal axis;

means carried by the frame for rotating said brush in a given direction relative to said frame;

a plurality of fluid nozzle means carried by the frame generally parallel to the axis of rotation of said brush and located on the back side of the brush wherein the brush bristles rotate toward the floor surface as the brush rotates;

said fluid noule mans having outlets positioned to direct fluid toward the floor surface near the ena em nt of the bru h with the flo r s rface; a ac uun f nozzle fixe y carried by fire rame on the front side of the brush opposite said fluid nozzle means and positioned to be located adjacent the floor surface for extracting fluid from the floor surface;

13. The apparatus of claim 12 comprising:

means for supplying fluid under pressure to said fluid nozzle means for spraying fluid toward the floor surface near the engagement of the brush with the floor surface, and i vacuum means for extracting fluid from the floor surface by way of said vacuum nozzle.

14. The apparatus of claim 13 wherein:

said frame comprises an exterior shell extending downward to define an exterior periphery to substantially floor surface level to increase the suction of said vacuum nozzle.

15. The apparatus of claim 14 comprising:

an inner shield surrounding said brush and said fluid nozzle means to confine fluid flow around said brush.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1670934 *Apr 1, 1925May 22, 1928Keefer Walter LScrubbing and carpet-washing machine
US1801135 *Jun 20, 1927Apr 14, 1931Blogg Fred HFloor-scrubbing machine
US1803693 *Apr 24, 1929May 5, 1931Herbert A CuttingCleaning means
US1975380 *May 31, 1932Oct 2, 1934Schulx Bruno JPortable rug washing and cleaning device
US2003215 *Jul 17, 1934May 28, 1935Nadig Francis HFloor cleaner
US2659921 *Nov 1, 1947Nov 24, 1953Eureka Williams CorpRotary brush for suction cleaners
US3344453 *Oct 23, 1965Oct 3, 1967Price William BFloor treating apparatus
US3402420 *Oct 15, 1965Sep 24, 1968Daniel D. SchaefferCarpet cleaning device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3871051 *Sep 12, 1973Mar 18, 1975Collier Co Ltd Syd WMachine for cleaning carpets and the like
US3959844 *Feb 5, 1975Jun 1, 1976Chemko Industries, Inc.Carpet soil extractor
US4069540 *Jul 14, 1976Jan 24, 1978Frank J. Zamboni & Co.Machine for removing painted stripes from artificial turf
US4095309 *Sep 25, 1975Jun 20, 1978John J. Sundheim Family EstateApparatus for cleaning a carpet
US4196492 *Dec 14, 1978Apr 8, 1980H. B. Fuller CompanyAutomatic carpet cleaning machine
US4210978 *Dec 20, 1977Jul 8, 1980H. B. Fuller CompanyAutomatic carpet cleaning machine
US4234995 *Jul 9, 1979Nov 25, 1980Parise & Sons, Inc.Power scrubber with pivotably mounted recovery head
US4397057 *Sep 11, 1981Aug 9, 1983The Singer CompanyApparatus for cleaning carpets and the like
US4549328 *Jul 13, 1983Oct 29, 1985Whirlpool CorporationConvertible vacuum and powder carpet cleaner
US4956891 *Feb 21, 1990Sep 18, 1990Castex Industries, Inc.Floor cleaner
US4974618 *Sep 9, 1985Dec 4, 1990Duraclean International, Inc.Apparatus and method for fabric cleaning with foam
US5088149 *Aug 6, 1990Feb 18, 1992Tennant CompanyVacuum powered scrub head
US6076228 *Jul 2, 1998Jun 20, 2000Aiken; Michael D.Floor cleaner with vacuum dryer
US6131237 *Aug 13, 1998Oct 17, 2000Bissell Homecare, Inc.Upright extraction cleaning machine
US6263539Dec 23, 1999Jul 24, 2001Taf BaigCarpet/floor cleaning wand and machine
US6588050Jun 8, 2001Jul 8, 2003Michael D. AikenFloor cleaner
US6898820Jul 23, 2001May 31, 2005Bissell Homecare, Inc.Extraction cleaning with heating
US7707682 *Dec 19, 2003May 4, 2010Techtronic Floor Care Technology LimitedCleaning machine for cleaning a surface with edge cleaning capability
US7862623Jun 8, 2000Jan 4, 2011Bissell Homecare, Inc.Extraction cleaning with oxidizing agent
US8146194 *Apr 7, 2008Apr 3, 2012James FarrellBuffing apparatus
US8549697May 28, 2009Oct 8, 2013Bissell Homecare, Inc.Unattended spot cleaning with surface sanitization
DE202013103961U1Sep 3, 2013Sep 16, 2013Wessel-Werk GmbhReinigungsvorrichtung zur Nassreinigung von Bodenflächen
EP0032654A2 *Dec 18, 1980Jul 29, 1981NOVUM - Novitā in Elettrodomestica SrlMachine to wash surfaces
EP0343129A2 *May 18, 1989Nov 23, 1989Felice ScaringiDevice for cleaning surfaces, such as floor, with removal of the cleaning liquor
WO2005107563A1 *May 5, 2005Nov 17, 2005Tennant CoSecondary introduction of fluid into vacuum system
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/320
International ClassificationA47L11/00, A47L11/34, A47L11/30, A47L11/29
Cooperative ClassificationA47L11/4069, A47L11/4041, A47L11/302, A47L11/4044, A47L11/4088, A47L11/34, A47L11/4077, A47L11/4083
European ClassificationA47L11/40N2, A47L11/40M, A47L11/40F4, A47L11/40F6, A47L11/40N6, A47L11/40J4, A47L11/34, A47L11/30B