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Publication numberUS3699912 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1972
Filing dateJun 7, 1971
Priority dateJun 7, 1971
Publication numberUS 3699912 A, US 3699912A, US-A-3699912, US3699912 A, US3699912A
InventorsWilson Thomas B Jr
Original AssigneeWilson Thomas B Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bulk cargo safety barrier apparatus
US 3699912 A
Abstract
Apparatus for confining a bulk cargo, such as oil, within the hull of a ship should such hull be ruptured as by a collision or grounding. The apparatus includes inner and outer barriers of a form-sustaining but flexible liquid-tight material. Upon deformation of the ship's hull, the panels can be deflected without rupturing, and the adjoining panels of such barriers will sealingly interengage so as to prevent leakage of the bulk cargo contained within the hull.
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United States Patent Wilson, Jr.

154] BULK CARGO SAFETY BARRIER APPARATUS [72] Inventor: Thomas B. Wilson, Jr., 712 Via Del Monte, Palos Verdes Estates, Calif. 90274 22 Filed: June 7,1971

21 Appl.No.: 150,422

[52] US. Cl ..114/74 R, 220/85 B [S 1] Int. Cl. ..B63b 25/08 [58] Field of Search.....114/72, 73, 74 R, 74 A, 74 T, 114/68, 69, 54, 16 E, 0.5 T; 220/13, 18, 85

B, 85 A; ISO/0.5

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,060 3/ 1843 Mickles ..1 14/69 2,696,185 12/1954 Snoddy ..114/74 R 51 Oct. 24, 1972 2,991,906 7/1961 Eligoulachvili ..1 14/74 R X 3,272,373 9/1966 Alleaume et al. 124/74 A X 3,477,401 11/1969 Hayama ..1 14/74 A Primary Examiner-Milton Buchler Assistant Examiner-F. K. Yee Attorney-Fulwider, Patton, Rieber, Lee & Utecht 57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for confining a bulk cargo, such as oil, within the hull of a ship should such hull be ruptured as by a collision or grounding. The apparatus includes inner and outer barriers of a form-sustaining but flexible liquid-tight material. Upon deformation of the ships hull, the panels can be deflected without rupturing, and the adjoining panels of such barriers will sealingly interengage so as to prevent leakage of the bulk cargo contained within the hull.

8 Claims, 6 Drawing Figures PATENTED OCT 24 I972 SHEET 2 OF 2 mm W ,5. J m 5 M FOnB BULK CARGO SAFETY BARRIER APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to shipping bulk cargo and more particularly to apparatus for confining bulk cargo within a compartment should the walls of such compartment be ruptured.

2. Description of the Prior Art Spills of bulk cargo and particularly of liquid hydrocarbon compounds such as petroleum, crude oil, fuel oil and the like present a serious water pollution problem. Various means have been proposed to confine such cargos within a ships hull should the ships hull be ruptured. The applicant is aware of the following U. S. Patents directed to this general subject matter.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It is a major object of the present invention to provide apparatus for confining bulk cargo within the compartment of a ship should the hull of such ship be ruptured. This apparatus includes inner and outer barriers which have panels that are sealingly secured to the walls of one or more compartments of the ships hull. These inner and outer barriers are formed of a formsustaining but flexible liquid-tight material. Should the ships hull be deformed, the panels will also undergo deformation but without rupturing. Thereafter, the adjoining portions of these inner and outer barriers will cooperate so as to define a seal restraining escape of the bulk cargo.

Various other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view showing a ship provided with a preferred apparatus embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a broken perspective view in enlarged scale showing such apparatus;

FIG. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken in enlarged scale along line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a broken horizontal sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a broken horizontal sectional viewtaken partially of the area illustrated in FIG. 4 showing the operation of such apparatus should the hull of the ship within which the apparatus is installed be ruptured by another vessel; and

FIG. 6 is a vertical sectional view similar to FIG. 3

showing the operation of said apparatus under the conditions illustrated in FIG. 5.

Referring to the drawings and particularly FIG. 1 thereof, there is shown a ship S which for the purposes of illustration is of the oil tanker type. The hull 12 of the ship S is provided with a plurality of longitudinally adjoining compartments, each of which extends across the width of the vessel, such compartments being designated C-l through C-7. It will be understood that each of the compartments will receive a bulk cargo, such as a liquid hydrocarbon. The confines of the compartments may be isolated from one another.

Referring now to the remaining figures of the drawing, each of the afore-mentioned compartments is defined by the bottom wall 13 and top wall 14 of the ships hull 12, the sides 15 and 16 of the hull and fore and aft bulk heads 18 and 20, respectively. Each of the compartments c-l through 0-7 is adapted to receive apparatus embodying the present invention, the apparatus within each such compartment being substantially similar.

This apparatus includes an inner barrier I and an outer barrier 0. The inner barrier I is of generally cupped configuration having a bottom panel 30 comprising a horizontal center portion 32 and a pair of upwardly and outwardly extending sections 34 and 36 respectively. The outer ends of the sections 34 and 36 are integral with a pair of upstanding side panels 38 and 40 and fore and aft panels 42 and 44. Referring particularly to FIG. 4, the fore and aft panels 42 and 44 are defined by overlapped fore and aft transversally extending center webs 46 and 48 respectively, and rear wardly and outwardly extending sections 50 and 52 with respect to the forward panels 42 and forwardly and outwardly extending sections 54 and 56 with respect to the aft panels 44. It will be noted that the overlapped center sections 46 and 48 are sealingly secured to one another and to the mid-portion of fore and aft bulkheads 18 and 20. The upper edges of side panels 38 and 40 are formed with integral tubular flotation elements 56 and 58. The center section 32 of bottom panel 30 is sealingly affixed to the mid-portion of the hulls bottom wall 10.

The outer barrier 0 includes a top panel 60 defined by a horizontal center section 62 and a pair of downwardly and outwardly extending transverse sections 64 and 66. The outer edges of the transverse section 64 and 66 are integral with the upper edges of depending side panels 68 and 70. The outer edges of the section 64 and 66 are also integral with fore and aft panels, generally designated 72 and 74. As indicated particularly in FIG. 4, the panels 72 are defined by left and right-hand sections 76 and 78 having transverse webs 80 that are sealingly affixed to the forward bulkhead 18 just outwardly of the attachment point of fore and aft panels 42 and 44. The panels 74 are defined by left and right-hand sections 82 and 84 having transverse webs 86 that are sealingly affixed to the aft bulkhead 20 outwardly of the mid-portion thereof. As indicated particularly in FIG. 3, a center filler pipe 87 may be extended through the top wall 13 into the upper portion of the space encompassed by the outer barrier 0 within compartment C-4. Left and right filler pipes 88 and 90 may be extended through top wall 13 into the side portions of this compartment at the upper portion thereof above the outer barrier 0. As shown particularly in FIG. 2, and additionally in FIG. 3, the lower edges of the side panels 68 and 70 are formed with integral tubular elements 92 and 94, the confines of S which are provided with a weighted material 96. Referring again to FIG. 2, a plurality of vent holes 97 are formed in top panel 60 of the outer barrier 0.

With continued reference to FIG. 2,.one or more stretchable lines 98 may be extended from the upper edges of side panels 38 and 40 of inner barrier I through vent holes 97 to the top wall 14 to supplement the effect of the flotation elements 56 and 58. When such stretchable lines are utilized the flotation elements may be eliminated. The flotation elements and/or the stretchable lines serve to apply a yieldable upwardlyacting force on the side panels 38 and 40. It should be noted that in the interest of clarity the stretchable lines 98 are not shown in FIGS. 3 and 6.

Both the inner barrier l and the outer barrier are preferably formed of similar material that is formsustaining but flexible and liquid-tight. Various natural or synthetic rubbers or synthetic plastics or combinations thereof may be utilized, it being understood that this material will be chemically inert with respect to the bulk cargo confined within the barriers.

In the operation of the aforedescribed apparatus, the

inner and outer barriers will normally be disposed in their configuration of FIGS. 2, 3 and 4. The flotation tubes 56 and 58 will support the side panels 38 and 40 of the inner barrier I in a generally upright position. The weighted material 96 of the tubular elements 92 and 94 will maintain the side panels 68 and 70 of the outer barrier 0 in a generally vertically depending position. Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6, should the hull 12 of the ship S be ruptured as by the bow 100 of a second vessel, the material from which the inner and outer barriers are formed will permit the barriers to be deformed without rupturing. As shown in these figures, the portion of the inner and outer barriers engaged by the ships bow 100 will be urged into sealing engagement with one another. Such sealing engagement will be assisted by the provision of the tubular flotation elements 58 and/or stretchable lines 98 and the weighted tubular element 94, the former maintaining an upwardly-acting force on the sidepanel 40 and the latter maintaining a downwardly acting force on the side panel 70. The sealing engagement between the inner and outer barriers will continue when the ships bow 100 has been withdrawn from within the confines of the hull 12. In this manner, the bulk cargo withincompartment C-4 will be restrained against outward leakage from hull 12.

Various modifications and changes may be made with respect to the foregoing detailed description without departing from the spirit of the present invention.

Iclaim:

1. Apparatus for confining bulk cargo within a compartment of a ship should the hull of such ship be ruptured, said compartment being defined by a bottom wall, a top wall, the sides of said ship, and fore and aft bulkheads extending between'the sides of such ship and said walls, id a aratus om risin a generally cug shaped innei barrier having a bottom panel sealingly secured to said bottom wall, fore and aft panels sealingly secured to said bulkheads, and side panels that extend upwardly from the outer edges of said bottom panel;

an inverted generally cup-shaped outer barrier having a top panel sealingly secured to said top wall, fore and aft panels sealingly secured to said bulkheads, and side panels that depend from said top panel alongside and exteriorly of the side panels of said inner barrier; and

with said innerand outer barriers being fabricated of a form-sustaining but flexible liquid-tight material whereby said panels can be deflected without rupturing upon deformation of the ship's hull, and with the portions of said barriers that are deflected together undergoing sealing engagement to thereby restrain said bulk cargo against outward leakage from said hull.

2. Apparatus as set forth in claim I wherein the upper portion of the side panels of said inner barrier are provided with means that apply a yieldable upward force on said side panels.

3. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein the lower portion of the side panels of said outer barrier are weighted.

4. Apparatus as set forth in claim 1 wherein the midportion of said bottom and top panels are secured to said bottom wall and top wall respectively, the mid-portion of the fore and aft panels of said inner barrier is secured to the mid-portion of said fore and aft bulkheads, and the inner portions of said outer panels are secured to said fore and aft bulkheads just outwardly of the attachment point of the fore and aft panels of said inner barrier thereto.

5. Apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein said means are flotation elements.

6. Apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein the lower portion of the side panels of said outer barrier are weighted.

7. Apparatus as set forth in claim 2 wherein the midportion of said bottom and top panels are secured to said bottom wall and top wall respectively, the mid-portion of the fore and aft panels of said inner barrier is secured to the mid-portion of said fore and aft bulkheads, and the inner portions of said outer panels are secured to said fore and aft bulkheads just outwardly of the attachment point of the fore and aft panels of said inner barrier thereto.

8. Apparatus as set forth in claim 3 wherein the midportion of said bottom and top panels are secured to said bottom wall and top wall respectively, the mid-portion of the fore and aft panels of said inner barrier is secured to the mid-portion of said fore and aft bulkheads, and the inner portions of said outer panels are secured to said fore and aft bulkheads just outwardly of the attachment point of the fore and aft panels of said inner barrier thereto.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3060 *Apr 25, 1843 Improvement in the mode of preventing steamboats from sinking
US2696185 *Dec 26, 1951Dec 7, 1954Phillips Petroleum CoLiquid cargo barge
US2991906 *May 27, 1957Jul 11, 1961Leon EligoulachviliStructure for transporting cargoes
US3272373 *Oct 10, 1963Sep 13, 1966Alleaume Jean HenriFlexible and elastic tanks for transporting liquids in bulk
US3477401 *May 6, 1968Nov 11, 1969Akio HayamaOil tanker
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3832966 *Jul 26, 1973Sep 3, 1974Garcia EMethod of building tankers for preventing oil spills in case of wreck
US3906880 *Dec 19, 1974Sep 23, 1975Hebert Floyd EOil recovery apparatus for a tanker
US4461402 *Apr 1, 1983Jul 24, 1984Don Fell LimitedContainer liner
US4982678 *Jun 1, 1989Jan 8, 1991Frederick Research Corp.Method and apparatus for impeding the spillage of a liquid cargo from a damaged water-traveling vessel
US5070801 *Jul 5, 1990Dec 10, 1991Environmental Innovations, Inc.Method and apparatus for impeding the spillage of a liquid cargo from a damaged water-traveling vessel
US5107782 *Jul 5, 1990Apr 28, 1992Environmental Innovations, Inc.Method and apparatus for impeding the spillage of a liquid cargo from a damaged water-traveling vessel
US5503291 *Jul 26, 1993Apr 2, 1996Craig; James E.Tankship cargo bladder
DE4321105C1 *Jun 25, 1993Nov 3, 1994Guenter KollmannTanker
DE102004041593A1 *Aug 26, 2004Mar 2, 2006Lindenau Gmbh Schiffswerft Und MaschinenfabrikDoppelhüllentankschiff
DE102004041593B4 *Aug 26, 2004Feb 15, 2007Lindenau Gmbh Schiffswerft Und MaschinenfabrikDoppelhüllenschiff
WO1990014984A1 *May 31, 1990Dec 13, 1990Frederick Research CorpMethod and apparatus for impeding the spillage of a liquid cargo from a damaged water-traveling vessel
WO2006021394A2Aug 22, 2005Mar 2, 2006Lindenau GmbhDouble skin tanker
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/74.00R, 220/720
International ClassificationB63B43/18, B63B25/08, B63B25/00, B63B43/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63B43/18, B63B25/082
European ClassificationB63B25/08L, B63B43/18