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Publication numberUS3699924 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1972
Filing dateAug 21, 1970
Priority dateAug 21, 1970
Publication numberUS 3699924 A, US 3699924A, US-A-3699924, US3699924 A, US3699924A
InventorsHero Richard A
Original AssigneePort A Stall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Horse stall construction
US 3699924 A
Abstract
A kick-proof and chew-proof horse stall construction having wall panels, each comprising a plywood sheet having sheet metal contiguous with the inner and outer sides thereof; and a frame comprising removably bolted together members for holding said wall panels in an upright assembly to form a stall structure which may readily be disassembled and moved and reassembled.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Hero HORSE STALL CONSTRUCTION Richard A. Hero, Scottsdale, Ariz.

Assignee: Port-A-Stall Filed: Aug. 21, 1970 App]. No.: 65,936

Inventor:

US. Cl ..119/16, 119/27 Int. Cl. ..A01k 01/00 Field of Search ..119/15, 16, 27; 52/615, 622,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS Tatevossian ..52/282 X [451 Oct. 24, 1972 4/1968 12/1962 Lindgren ..52/282 X Primary Examiner-Hugh R. Chamblee AttorneyDrummond, Cahill & Phillips 5 ABSTRACT A kick-proof and chew-proof horse stall construction having wall panels, each comprising a plywood sheet having sheet metal contiguous with the inner and outer sides thereof; and a frame comprising removably bolted together members for holding said wall panels in an uprightassembly to form a stall structure which may readily be disassembled and moved and reassembled.

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RICHARD A. HERO BY EM, 454/- WW ATTORNEYS HORSE STALL CONSTRUCTION Heretofore, horse stall structures have been made of wood and many of them have been kicked down by horses and much of the wooden structures have been chewed away so as to weaken partitions or other portions of such structures. Conventional wooden construction is difficult to maintain, to keep clean, and in many instances such structures are unattractive due to the fact that they become dilapidated and soiled. Many of the wooden stall structures have been subject to the ravages of vermin and termites.

In accordance with the present invention, a novel horse stall construction comprises a metal frame and wall panels composed of strong plywood having sheet metal contiguous with the inner and outer sides thereof. Accordingly, the structure of the present invention is not subject to being chewed by horses. Additionally, the stall construction of the present invention is kick-proof due to the fact that a steel frame supports wall panels which are made of plywood and have inner and outer surfaces protected with sheet metal.

The wall panels of the invention are specifically designed so as to be highly resistant to kicking by horses and yet provide for sufficient yieldability or resilience so as to' allow a horse to kick the walls without causing damage to the horse's feet or legs.

Another object of the invention is to provide a horse stall construction which is easily assembled and disassembled so that the structure may be readily portable and may be moved from place to place to accommodate a horse.

Another object of the invention is to provide a facility wherein several stalls may readily be assembled in adjacent relationship to each other.

Another object of the invention is to provide a horse stall construction which is very economical, attractive, clean, and which is subject to a low maintenance cost.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a horse stall construction having a roof spaced above upper ends of walls and partitions thereof to provide for adequate ventilation.

A further object of the invention is to provide a horse stall construction which is virtually vermin and termiteroof. p Further objects and advantages of the invention may be apparent from the following specification, appended claims, and accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of two rows of stalls having a covered breeze-way between the stalls and in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of one of the stalls of the invention.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view taken from the line 3-3 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, plan, sectional view taken from the line 4-4 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, plan, sectional view taken from the line 5-5 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view taken from the line 6-6 of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a vertical sectional view taken from the line 77 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 8 is a vertical sectional view taken from the line 8-8 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 9 is an enlarged, fragmentary, plan, sectional view taken from the line 9-9 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 10 is an enlarged, fragmentary, front, elevational view of the horse stall construction of the invention.

As shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings, the horse stall construction of the invention may comprise several stalls in a row and several rows of such stalls with a breeze-way therebetween.

In FIG. 1, a first row 20 of horse stalls is spaced from a second row of stalls 22 and a breeze-way 24 between the rows 20 and 22 is covered by a roof 26.

Referring to FIG. 2, it will be seen that a horse stall 28 of the row 20 comprises a doorway 30 opening into the breeze-way 24 shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings.

The stall 28 is provided with a plurality of wall panels 32, each of which is constructed basically of a plywood sheet which is 4 feet wide and 8 feet'tall. As shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, each panel 32 comprises a plywood core 34 having a sheet of galvanized metal 36 adhesively secured to the inner side thereof and a sheet of vertically corrugated metal 38 secured to the outer side of said plywood sheet 34.

Each plywood sheet 34 is substantially three-quarters of an inch thick, as will be hereinafter described, and the inner sheet of metal 36 is preferably made of galvanized iron approximately 26 gauge, as will be hereinafter described in detail. Disposed over the an upper edge 40 of each panel 32 is an inverted channel structure 42 secured to the panel 32 by means of bolts 44 which extend through the legs of the channel 42 and through the metal sheets 36 and 38 as well as the plywood sheet 34.

Each panel 32 is provided with a lower edge 46 secured by bolts 48 which pass through a channel member 50 which is welded to an inverted base channel member 52. Bolts 48 clamp the panel 32 between opposed legs 56 of the channel member 50.

The base channel member 52 is provided with legs having downwardly extending edges 58 and 60 which may rest on a concrete foundation or may utilize the ground as a foundation.

It will be seen that the channel member 50 is welded at 62 and 64 to the upper surface 66 of the channel member 52.

As shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, vertical edges of the panels 32 are disposed in adjacent relationship to vertical columns 68. These vertical columns 68, as shown in FIG. 4 of the drawings, are generally rectangular in cross section tubular members. Each vertical column 68 is secured to a respective base channel member 52 by means of an upstanding telescopic stub 70 which is welded at 72 to the upper surface 66 of the base channel member 52. The telescopic stub 70, as shown in FIG. 4, is a rectangular in cross section member and conformingly fits the inside 72 of the respective vertical columns 68.

A bolt 74 extends through the normally lower end of the vertical columns 68 and through the telescopic stub member 70 for securing the vertical columns 68 to the stubs 70 and the base channel 52, all as shown best in FIGS. 4 and 7 of the drawings.

As shown in FIG. 4, vertical edges of the panels 32 are secured to straps 76 which are welded to vertical portions of the vertical columns 68. Bolts 78 extend through the straps 76 and the panels 32 at their vertical 4 securely fixed to the vertical columns 68.

As shown in FIG. 5 of the drawings, a corner colunm 82 is similar to the columns 68 but is disposed at a right angle corner of the stall construction of the invention.

As shown on an enlarged scale in FIG. 5 of the drawings, the corner column 82 is secured to a base channel member 52 by means of a telescopic stub 84 similar to the stub 70 disclosed in FIG. 7 of the drawings, and a bolt 86 passes through the corner column 82 and the telescopic stub 84 for securing the corner column member 82 to the respective base channel 52.

Welded to sides of the corner column member 82 and disposed at right angles to each other are angle members 88 and 90. These angle members 88 and 90 are provided with bolts 92 and 94 extending therethrough. These bolts extend through respective panels 32 and also clamping straps 96 and 98 respectively for clamping the panels 32 into secure connected relation with the vertical corner column 82.

The connections made by the bolts 92 and 94 are similar to that provided by the bolts 78 hereinbefore described in FIG. 4 of the drawings.

The base channel members 52 are shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 of the drawings, and are secured together by means of a pair of bolts 100 and 102 which extend through a clip 104 welded to one of the base channel members 52 and extending from the side thereof. The member 104 extends into the open end of the adjacent channel member 52 and into contiguous relationship with a lower surface 106 of the horizontal web thereof, all as shown best in'FIG. 6 of the drawings. In this manner, the bolts 100 and 102 shown in FIG. 5 secure the base channel members 52 together, specifically as shown in FIG. 6 of the drawings. As shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings, rectangular in cross section tubular rafters 108 are supported on upper portions 110 of the vertical column members 68 in spaced relationship above the channel members 42 which are disclosed in FIG. 3 and which are disposed over upper edges of the panels 32.

As shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings, corrugated metal roofing sheets 1 are supported on the rafters 108 and these roofing sheets 110 are thus spaced considerably above the upper edges of the panels 32 to provide for ventilation of the horse stall construction of the invention.

The rafters 108 are provided with downwardly extending telescopic tubular stub structures 112 which are welded at 114 to lower portions of the rafters 108. These stub structures 112 are fitted into upper ends of the vertical columns 68 and bolts 116 are disposed through the upper portions of the columns 68 and the telescopic stubs 112 to secure upper ends of the columns 68 to the rafters 108 and to maintain the rafters 108 in connection with the columns 68, all as shown best in FIGS. 2 and 8 of the drawings.

As shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings, one of the vertical columns 68 may be provided with a pair of opposed angle members 118 and 120. These angle members 118 and 120 are provided for connecting adjacent vertical wall panels of adjacent stalls and the angle members 118 and 120 are welded to opposite sides of the respective vertical column members 68 and function in a manner similar to the straps 76 disclosed in FIG. 4 of the drawings. Accordingly, it will be appreciated that straps 76 may be used or angle members, such as the angle members 118 and 120, may be used to provide for connection of panels 32 at opposite sides of a respective vertical column member 68.

As shown in FIG. 9 of the drawings, a third angle member 122 is connected to the vertical column member 68 and is disposed at substantially right angles to the angle members 118 and 120.. The angle member 122 is disposed for connection with a vertical edge portion of one of the panels 32 which is adapted to form a partition between stalls when a contiguous with each other.

The panel 32, which may be connected to the angle member 122, may be provided with metal sheets on opposite sides thereof and such metal sheets may be similar to the metal sheet 36 which is as hereinbefore described.

Accordingly, the stall construction of the invention may relate to a single stall or a plurality of stalls connected in end-to-end or side-to-side relationship with each other to form rows of stalls as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawings.

As shown in FIG. 10 of the drawings, vertical columns 124- and 126 are similar to the vertical columns 68 and are provided with angle members 128 and 130 on only one side. These angle members 128 and 130 are similar to the angle members 1 18 and 120.

Secured to the opposite side of the vertical column member 126 from the angle member 130 are hinges 132 hingedly connecting a door 134 to swing between the column members 124and 126. This door is provided with a conventional bar-type latch 136.

A bottom door 138 is carried by a pair of hinges 140 secured to the vertical column member 126 in alignment with the hinges 132 and the latch 142 is connected with the column 124 for latching the bottom door 138 between the column members 124 and 126.

The door 136 may be opened independently of the door 138 as desired.

A feed door 144 is hingedly connected to one of the panels 32 to provide access to the interior thereof and to a feed box inside the stall of the invention.

As hereinbefore described, all of the panels 32 are preferably constructed of plywood substantially three quarters of an inch thick with metal sheets contiguous with the inner and outer sides thereof.

The panels 32 having the metal sheets 36 bonded to the inner sides thereof prevent horses from damaging the plywood sheets 34 when the horses kick the panels and the resilience of these panels is such that they are sufficiently yieldable to prevent a horse from hurting himself when he kicks them. Additionally, the threequarter inch plywood panels reinforced by the metal sheets 36 and 38 prevent destruction of the panels when kicked by a horse. Additionally, the metal covered plywood sheets 34 are not chewable by a horse and are fully covered and protected against weather as well as the attack by rodents and/or termites. The panels are very clean and may be readily washed down so as to maintain them sanitary and neat in appearance.

All of the bolts hereinbefore described for connecting the frame of the invention as well as the panels to plurality of stalls are the frame may be removed and replaced for disassembling or reassembling the stall construction of the invention so that it is readily portable when in pieces and may be quickly and economically set up on the ground or on a concrete foundation wherever desired.

The spaced relationship of the corrugated sheet metal roof 110 with the upper edge portions of the panels which are covered by the channels 42 provides for ample ventilation within each of the horse stalls of the invention.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 9 of the drawings, it will be apparent that a plurality of stalls may be constructed in accordance with the present invention with some of the panels 32 forming partitions rather than outside walls.

I claim:

1. In a horse stall construction, the combination of: a building frame; vertical wall panels secured to said frame; each of said panels comprising a plywood sheet having inner and outer sides; a first relatively thin sheet of metal contiguous with said outer side of said plywood sheet; a second relatively thin sheet of metal contiguous with said inner side of said plywood sheet; said panels having substantially vertical edges, said frame provided with substantially vertical metal columns; said panels removably bolted to said columns; said frame being provided with a substantially horizontal metal base structure adapted to rest on a foundation; said columns removably bolted to said base frame structure.

2. The invention as defined in claim 1, wherein said panels are provided with upper and lower edges; each panel at its lower edge being bolted to said base frame structure.

3. The invention as defined in claim 2, wherein an inverted channel-shaped member is disposed over the upper edge of each of said panels.

4. The invention as defined in claim 2, wherein a roof is supported on said columns; said columns extending substantially above said upper edges of said panels, said roof being spaced above said upper edges of said panels.

5. The invention as defined in claim 2, wherein a plurality of said stalls are disposed adjacent each other and some of said panels form partitions between said stalls.

6. The invention as defined in claim 1, wherein said columns are rectangular in cross section tubing, said base frame structure being made of inverted channel members.

7. The invention as defined in claim 6, wherein angle

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3070646 *Nov 3, 1960Dec 25, 1962Lindgren Erik APolar screen room
US3376676 *May 1, 1967Apr 9, 1968Leon TatevossianPrefabricated aluminum building
US3380875 *Feb 6, 1964Apr 30, 1968Kaiser Aluminium Chem CorpArticle and method for making a balanced panel from an unbalanced woody core
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3895606 *Jan 25, 1974Jul 22, 1975Galloway Charles HModular kennel building
US4273072 *Oct 2, 1979Jun 16, 1981Choisel DanielPrefabricated wall structure for forming an enclosure such as a horse-box
US4706608 *Jan 22, 1986Nov 17, 1987The Marmon Group, Inc.Incubation structure
US4726154 *Dec 2, 1985Feb 23, 1988Port-A-StallAnimal housing system
EP0010042A1 *Oct 2, 1979Apr 16, 1980Daniel Paul Léon ChoiselWall frame with opening and door for a pre-fabricated horse's box
Classifications
U.S. Classification119/519, 119/498
International ClassificationA01K1/00, E04B2/58
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/58, A01K1/0094
European ClassificationA01K1/00F, E04B2/58