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Publication numberUS3700003 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1972
Filing dateApr 15, 1971
Priority dateApr 15, 1971
Publication numberUS 3700003 A, US 3700003A, US-A-3700003, US3700003 A, US3700003A
InventorsSmith Russell G
Original AssigneeSmith Russell G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve with flow regulating means
US 3700003 A
Images(6)
Previous page
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Smith VALVE WITH FLOW REGULATING MEANS Inventor:

Russell G. Smith, 2805 Digby Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45220 Filed: April 15, 1971 App1.No.: 134,364

Related U.S. Application Data Continuation-impart of Ser. No. 851,951, Aug. 21, 1969, abandoned.

US. Cl. ..137/6l4.17, 137/630, 137/630.21,

137/637.5, 251/207 [51] Int. Cl. ..F16k 5/02, Fl6k 31/44, F16k 5/10 [58] Field of Search ..l37/614.l7, 614.16, 630, 630.21,

References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 7 2,769,456 11/1956 Atkinson "137 375 1 Oct. 24, 1972 657,059 8/1900 Broomell ..251/1 10 1,088,103 2/1914 Schreidt ..251/207 3,276,739 10/1966 Freed ..25 l/368 3,460,568 8/1969 Busquets 1 37/614. 1 7

Primary Examiner-M. Cary Nelson Assistant Examiner-Wi1liam 1'1. Wright Attorney.l. Warren Kinney, Jr.

[57] ABSTRACT The valve is one which, by preference, has a Teflon liner forming a self-lubricating seal within which the hollow valving member rotates; and included in the structure is a flow regulator in the form of a replaceable or adjustable orifice sleeve which nonnally is embodied wholly within the axial bore of the hollow valving member.

25 Claims, 20 Drawing Figures PATENTED 13.760 003 4 same or 6 I EN I I j ATTOR p.

PATENTEDncTM I972 0am aure' FIG 9 1 3O 20 IO 0 20 4060 so I00 I20 I40 I60 INVENTOR. G. SMITH RUSSELL "Ar rm? r PATENTED um 24 m2 Sum u 0F 6 FIG-l2 4a FIG-l3 FIG-l5 I INVENTOR RUSSEPL G.' SMITH VALVE WITH FLOW REGULATING MEANS This invention is a continuation-in-part of my copending patent application, Ser. No. 851,951, filed Aug. 21, 1969 now abandoned.

This invention relates to a valve with flow regulating means of a simple and effective type, whereby the characteristics of the flow and the capacity of the valve may be altered, with ease and dispatch Under certain conditions of use, valves should be capable of very accurate regulation, to assure passage of fluid therethrough in predetermined amounts or at specified rates of flow, without damage to the seats and other components of the valve. The valve in many instances includes a non-metallic liner withinwhich the movable valving member seats to effect a leakproof seal. The liner may be formed of a wear-resistant selflubricating material, an example of which is polytetrafluoroethylene, trade-named TEFLON, which forms an ideal seal. The liner invariably is subject to erosion, particularly in valves which control fluids at high velocity, or fluids of a corrosive or abrasive nature, and protection of the liner accordingly is to be provided for.

An object of the invention is to provide in a lined valve, improved means for simply and accurately regulating the flow of a fluid, either liquid or gaseous, through the valve, in such a manner as to prevent damage to the liner as the valving member is rotated from one position to another.

Another object is to provide simple, economical, and

effective means, easily replaceable and easily adjustable within the valve, to provide for a desired flow control without shutdown of the pipe system in which the valve is incorporated.

A further object is to provide in a control valve, simple and effective means for the accurate control of flow, said means being in the form of multiple orifice sleeves differently shaped and easily substitutable for one another within the valve, to achieve different desired flow patterns; another object being to enable the bodily substitution of said orifice sleeves while the valve is in closed position, so that no loss of fluid may occur incident to interchanging of the sleeves.

Another object of the invention is to provide in a control valve, a flow control means comprising a normally stationary orifice sleeve supported within the movable valving member of the valve, to cooperate with the valving member port.

Still a further object of the invention is to provide in a lined control valve, flow control means comprising an orifice sleeve or flow cage which remains fixed and is held rigidly relative to the valve body and interiorly of a rotatable valving member whereby rotation of the valving member produces a pressure drop between the port defining edges of the orifice sleeve and valving member thereby protecting the liner from the fluid media being throttled by the valving member.

A further object of the invention is to substantially reduce wear or erosion of parts in a valve of the character disclosed.

The foregoing and other objects are attained by the means described herein and illustrated upon the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertical cross-section taken through th inlet and outlet ports of a valve embodying the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a development in the flat, of a substantially cylindrical orifice sleeve embodied in the movable valving member of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-section taken on line 3-3 of FIG. 1, showing the valve in the fully open position, subject to such constriction of flow as may be imposed by the internal orifice sleeve.

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3, indicating a flow constriction determined by a limited rotation of the valving member with no change in the position of the orifice sleeve.

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4, but showing the valve in fully closed position, the position of the orifice sleeve remaining unchanged.

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 3, the valving member being in full open position, but the orifice sleeve being rotated to a flow-constricting position establishing a reduced maximum flow.

FIG. 7 is a bottom view taken on line 7-7 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 8 is an exploded view of the FIG. 1 valve, on a reduced scale, certain parts being omitted.

FIG. 9, 10 and 11 are graphs indicating flow characteristics at different rotated positions of the valving member of a valve, utilizing different types of orifice sleeves.

FIG. 12 is a fragmental cross-section of a modification, showing a simplified construction of the valve and a modified form of orifice sleeve.

FIG. 13 is a fragmental elevational view taken on line 13-- 13 of FIG. 12, and detailing the orifice sleeve.

FIG. 14 is a fragmental cross-section of a second modification of the valve construction, in which the orifice sleeve is of a shape differing, from that of FIGS. 12 and 13, and in which said sleeve may be removed and replaced while the valving member remains seated in shut-off position.

FIG. 15 is a fragmental elevation taken on line l5 15 of FIG. 14, and detailing the orifice in the sleeve of FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is an exploded view of the valve of FIG. 12, on a reduced scale, certain parts being omitted, illustrating a modification of the orifice sleeve.

FIG. 17 is a'fragmental cross-section of the valve of FIG. 16.

FIG. 18 is a cross-section taken on line 18-18 of FIG. 17.

FIGS. 19 and 20 are cross-sectional views similar to FIG. 18 illustrating the valvingmember in throttling and closed positions respectively.

. The valve comprises a hollow body 20 having an inlet port 22 and an outlet port 24, with the usual flanges 26 or other means provided for connecting the valve in a pipe system conveying a fluid, either gaseous or liquid. Between the ports is a transverse bore 28, in which is supported a rotary valving member 30. The valving member 30, though herein illustrated as a tapered plug by way of example, may just as well be a cylindrical plug; or alternatively, it may be the rotary valving member of a ball valve, to which the present invention is equally adaptable.

The valving member 30 has an operating stem 32, which may be rotated either manually or by means of any form of motor, such as a fluid motor, electric motor, or the like, arranged to rotate the valving member between open and closed positions. In the interest of simplicity of disclosure, the valving member is shown operable by means of a hand lever 34, attached to a collar 36 suitably fixed upon the outer end of stem 32.

Beneath the collar 36 is located suitable means for precluding leakage of fluid upwardly about the valving member and its stem 32. Such means may include the sealing diaphragms 38, 40, clamped against the valve body by a removable bonnet 42 secured upon the body by means of bolts 44, and an internal pressure ring 46 applying force against the diaphragms where the diaphragms overlie the adjacent end of valving member or plug 30. Pressure against pressure ring 46 may be regulated by means of a circular row of adjusting screws 48 threadedly mounted in the bonnet at equal distances from stem 30. This particular sealing means is described in no greater detail, as it forms no part of the present invention. It is sufficient to note that the aforesaid sealing means normally precludes upward displacement of the valving member or plug 30, but permits bodily removal thereof from bore 28 after removal of the bolts 44.

By preference, though not of necessity, and depend- 7 ing upon the service requirements of the valve, the valving member or plug 30 seals against a resilient nonmetallic liner 50--50, which lines the bore 28. Liner 50-50 may be substantially in the form ofa cylindrical sleeve, or of such shape as will conform to the shape of plug 30, and it may be formed of a non-metallic, inherently slippery, self-lubricating material such as polytetrafluoroethylene, known in the trade as TEFLON". The liner is non-rotatable in bore 28, and forms continuous circular seals near opposite ends of the plug or valving member, above and below the diametral port 52 thereof. Port 52 is open at opposite ends of a diameter of the plug, so that a fluid controlled by the valve may pass through port 52 when in register with the inlet and outlet ports of the valve body. By rotating the plug about 90, the port 52 may be closed so as to preclude passage of fluid through the valve as is customary.

According to the present invention, the plug or valving member 30 is bored axially from one end 54 to produce a cylindrical bore 56 which extends above and below the upper and lower limits of plug port 52. The innermost or blind end of bore 56 is denoted 58. Bore 56 is adapted to receive, with a sliding fit, a hollow cylindrical sleeve-like member 60 referred to quite properly as an orifice sleeve or flow cage, which may be substantially coextensive in length with the length of bore 56. The orifice sleeve 60 is normally fixed against rotation, notwithstanding rotational manipulation of the plug or valving member 30 surrounding it. The plug or valving member may be provided with internal rings 62, 62, preferably of an inherently slippery material such as TEFLON, providing a substantially frictionless bearing means, as well as sealing means, in sliding contact with the outer cylindrical wall of orifice sleeve 60.

At opposite ends of a diameter of orifice sleeve 60 are formed the orifices 64 and 66, both in fluid communication with the open interior of said sleeve. Orifice 64 preferably is sized and shaped in correspondency with plug port 52; however, the opposite orifice 66 of the sleeve is to be contoured in a particular manner to determine the flow characteristic and the capacity of the valve output. Thus, as in the flat development of sleeve 60 depicted by FIG. 2, the orifice 66 may include convergent edges forming an apex 68. If the valving member or plug 30 be rotated relative to orifice sleeve 60, the area of the orifice 66 will be modified in accordance with its overlap or its degree of registry with the adjacent opening of plug port 52.

The extent to which there is registration between openings 70 and 66, determines the amount of fluid flow through the valve; and moreover, a changing position of a point in opening 70 with respect to the constriction 68, resulting from rotation of the valve plug or member 30, determines the throttling characteristic affecting the flow.

In connection with the foregoing, reference is made to FIG. 3 which shows in cross-section the relationship of elements depicted by FIG. 1, the valve being in the maximum flow condition. The apex 68 is seen to be located at a point quite remote from the outlet passageway of the valve body. According, the largest portion of the orifice 66 of sleeve 60, is in registry with the outlet passageway 24 and with the opening 70 of the plug port, this resulting in a high volume flow through the valve in the direction of the arrows.

Referring now to FIG. 4, the plug or valving member 30 has been rotated clockwise about 50 degrees toward closing position, thereby to reduce flow of fluid through the plug port opening 70 and part of the constricted portion 68 of orifice sleeve 60. Further clockwise rotating of the plug 30, FIG. 4, will further reduce the flow, but the rate of flow at various positions of the plug will be modified by the gradual restriction in size of orifice 66 in the direction ofapex 68.

As was previously noted, orifice sleeve 60 is normally fixed against rotation; however, the orifice sleeve is preferably fixed at different axially rotated positions of adjustment within the valving member or plug 30. This is illustrated by FIG. 6, wherein the orifice sleeve 60 is shown rotated counter-clockwise about 50 degrees from the FIG. 3 position. Sleeve 60 as before stated, is to be fixed, against rotation. When the sleeve is disposed according to FIG. 6, the constricted apex portion 68 of the sleeve is located in the flow path, and will therefore serve to reduce the maximum capacity of the valve. In the FIG. 6 position of the sleeve, apex portion 68 serves also to establish a desired flow pattern as plug 30 rotates between the open and closed valve positions.

The graph, FIG. 10, indicates the flow character of FIG. 6. In FIG. 10, the vertical column of numerals from 0 to indicate degrees of rotation of the valving member or plug 30 in moving from closed to open position. The horizontal row of numerals indicate GPM at 1 psi or Gallons per Minute at pressure of 1 Pound per Square Inch. According to the graph of FIG. 10, the valve of FIG. 6 will pass 34 GPM at the 90 or full open position of the valve plug. Also, the graph indicates a very sensitive control of flow through the valve during the first 45 of opening, after which the flow line flattens to indicate a gradual flow increase during the final 45 of opening.

The flow line of the FIG. 10 graph can be altered in many respects by simply changing the shape, size, and/or position of the orifice sleeve opening 66, which of course characterizes the flow through the valve for the purpose of meeting any given flow requirements as may be specified for some installations.

The graph, FIG. 9, indicates the flow character of the valve having an orifice sleeve as illustrated in FIGS. 16-20, wherein the ports of the orifice sleeve substantially equal in size to the port openings in the plug. The curve of the flow line here is seen to differ substantially from that of FIG. 10, particularly in the sensitivity of flow control during the first 70 of opening. The capacity of the valve here is greater than that of FIG. 6, but the control at opening is substantially less sensitive.

FIG. 11 is the graph for the valve of FIGS. 12 and 13, wherein the orifice sleeve 360 is provided with an upright narrow slot opening 362 and an adjacent transverse slot opening 364 forming an aperture pattern. In this instance, initial opening movement of the valve plug 30 first exposes the slot 364 to fluid flow; then as the opening movement approaches about 33 of plug rotation, the transverse slot 362 gradually is exposed to flow, resulting in the gradually increasing flow toward maximum indicated by the graph line between 33 and 90.

It is noted here that the orifices in the orifice sleeve of FIG. 13, as well as those of FIGS. 1 through 8, are subject to considerable modification for obtaining various desired flow characteristics. For example, in FIG. 13, the upright slot 362 could be disposed at an angle to the perpendicular, or slot 364 could be wider at one end than at the other, as might also the slot 362.

FIGS. 14 and 15 illustrate a slight, modification of the orifice used in the sleeve of FIGS. 1 through 8. The sleeve in FIGS. 14 and 15 is denoted 460, and the control orifice is indicated by the reference character 462. On the upstream side, the sleeve 460 has a larger opening or port 464. A similar larger opening or port is indicated at 366 upon the orifice sleeve of FIGS. 12 and 13, corresponding to the opening 64 of FIGS. land 2.

Various forms of means may be provided for precluding rotation of the orifice sleeve with the rotary valving member or plug of the valve. A simple means for the purpose is illustrated in FIGS. 12, 16 and 17, wherein the base 76 of the plug bore is integral with the valve body and carries an upstanding lug 78 located to engage a notch or depression 80 formed in the cylindrical wall of the orifice sleeve 360 of FIG. 12, and orifice sleeve 400 of FIGS. 16 and 17 at their lower ends. The notch or depression 80 may be one of several provided in the lower end of the orifice sleeve at different locations, to engage lug 78 at different rotated positions of the orifice sleeve. Changing the position of the orifice sleeve within the valving member or plug 30 serves to alter the flow characteristic, as was previously explained. The lug 78 and notch or notches 80, may be made much smaller than shown in FIG. 12, to provide for a greater range of orifice sleeve adjustment rotationally within the valve plug.

With further reference to FIG. 12, it should be un derstood that the lower end of sleeve 360 might carry an extending locating pin or the equivalent (not Illustrated), instead of the notch 80, to engage any one of many spaced depressions or blind holes (not illustrated) formed in the base wall 76 interiorly thereof, this being a reversal of the structure shown. It may here be noted that replacement or any desired adjustment of the orifice sleeve 360 rotationally within the valve, necessitates removal of the bonnet 42 and lifting of the valving member or plug 30 from the plug chamber in order to gain access to the orifice sleeve for purpose of replacement or adjustment thereof.

FIG. 14 illustrates an alternative form of means for adjustably supporting the orifice sleeve 460. In this form of the valve, the base wall 476 of the plug chamber is a part made detachable from the valve body by the removal of several screws 478. Base 476 may carry a stop member 480 to engage a cooperative stop member 482, like in FIG. 12, or equivalent means, so that the orifice sleeve 460 may not rotate with the valve plug. In this construction, the orifice sleeve is withdrawable from the open bottom of the valving member or plug 30, after removal of base 476, without unseating the plug or otherwise interfering with its normal function. The orifice sleeve so withdrawn may be replaced by a different sleeve, or the original sleeve may be rotationally adjusted as desired, and secured by replacement of base 476 according to FIG. 14. If plug is rotated to the closed position of FIG. 14, sleeve 460 can be bodily removed without interfering with process operation.

It should be understood in connection with FIG. 14, that a multiplicity of notches 482 may be provided in the lower end of sleeve 460, for selective engagement with lug 480, to provide for mounting of the orifice sleeve in different rotated positions of adjustment.

I Equivalent means for this purpose may be employed if desired, including reversal of the elements 480, 482, with the lug carried by the sleeve, and the lug-receptive recesses or holes provided in the material of the base at various locations. Other forms of equivalent securing means for the orifice sleeve will readily be substituted for the exemplary means herein disclosed.

The valve construction as illustrated by FIGS. 1 through 8, includes means whereby the orifice sleeve may be rotationally adjusted with the use of means exposed exteriorly of the valve body, thereby eliminating the need for partial disassembly, of the valve. In this construction, the bottom wall 82 of the plug chamber is provided with a bore 84 receptive of a shaft 86 disposed axially of the valving member or plug 30..The shaft is rotationally supported in the bore, and carries a diametrally bored cylindrical head 88 fitted into the open lower end of the orifice sleeve 60. A pin 90 or equivalent securing means locks the orifice sleeve to head 88, so that rotational movements of shaft 86 are transmitted to the orifice sleeve, independently of plug 30. Packings 92 provide seals about the adjusting shaft 86.

An adjusting wheel or disc 94 may be securely fixed to the exposed end of adjusting shaft 86, as by means of a nut 96. Member 94 may be provided with apertures 98 arranged in a circular row, said apertures being selectively receptive of a screw 100 having a pintle end 102 to enter a hole 104 in the bottom wall 82 of the valve body. A lock nut 106 fixes the screw to wheel or plate 94, with its end 102 engaging the hole 104. By this means, the wheel 94, its shaft-86, and the orifice sleeve 60 are fixed against rotation. It should be noted that whenever the valve is to be used the orifice sleeve is immovably fixed or secured to the valve body.

When it is considered necessary or desirable to change the flow characteristics of the valve, the supervisor need only remove the screw 100 from its aperture 98, rotate the wheel 94 to re-position the orifice sleeve as required, and then project the screws 100 through one of the apertures 98 that may be aligned with the hole 104, to lock the sleeve in the re-adjusted position. Although only one hole 104 appears on the drawing, FIG. 1, it is to be understood that several such holes receptive of screw 100 may be provided in the bottom wall 82 of the valve body, to augment rotational adjustability of the orifice sleeve. The number of apertures 98 provided in member 94 may be increased or decreased as required for the adjustability sought.

The orifice sleeve, preferably is formed of a suitable metal, as is also the valving member and certain other parts exposed to the fluid controlled by the valve, to resist any corrosive or abrasive effects of the fluid. As FIGS. 3 through 6 clearly indicate, the orifice sleeve in most positions of the valving member, shields the TEFLON liner 5050 from the cutting force of the flow through the valve.

With particular reference now to FIGS. 18, 19 and 20, it will be noted that the TEFLON liner 50 is effectively protected at all times whether the valving member is fully open, as in FIG. 18, in an intermediate or throttling position, as in FIG. 19, or fully closed, as in FIG. 20.

When the valving member 30 is in a fully opened position its port walls 402-404 and 406-408 are in substantial alignment with edges 401-403 and 405-407, respectively, of the edges of ports 399 of the orifice sleeve 400, and with edges 410-412 and 414-416 of the body port. A metal to TEFLON seal is obtained between the adjacent surfaces of valving member 30 and the liner 50.

When the valving member is disposed in a throttling position, between open and closed positions, as illustrated in FIG. 19, the unrestricted or straight-line flow of fluid media, as indicated by the headed arrow of FIG. 18, will be altered to the flow pattern illustrated by the headed arrows of FIG. 19, wherein the pressure drop occurring in the fluid media will occur between edges 404 and 406 of the valving member with edges 401 and 407 of the orifice sleeve, for thereby effectively confining the pressure drop and throttling action of the fluid media between the aforesaid metal surfaces of the valving member and orifice sleeve so that the flow does not impinge on the liner 50, thereby effectively preventing damage to the liner.

When the valving member has been advanced to a fully closed position its edges 404 and 406 will be disposed in overlapping relationship with portions of the liner 50 for providing a metal to TEFLON seal, as best illustrated in FIG. 20. When the valving member is rotated from closed to open position, the situation illustrated in FIG. 19 will again prevail wherein the pressure drop in the fluid media will occur between the metal edges 401-404 and 407-406 of the port edges of the orifice sleeve and valving member.

To summarize, it will be noted that the subject valve provides metal-to-metal throttling surfaces; no impingement of process fluid on the liner member and a drop tight shutoff when the valving member is rotated to a full closed position. Whenever the valving member is in the throttling range, that is, between full open and fully closed positions, all throttling of the fluid media is confined between the corresponding throttling surfaces of the orifice sleeve and valving member. When the valving member is in its closed, or shut off position, it engages the liner member 50 to provide a true double block and bleed shut off.

In control of process fluid, it is desirable to spread throttling over as wide a range as possible, and by varying the downstream port configuration of the orifice sleeve a variety of flow patterns can be obtained.

In those instances in which abrasive slurries containing, by way of example, titanium oxide are to be handled the inner, or orifice sleeve may be fabricated from a carbide material and another sleeve of carbide material may be pressed or otherwise applied onto the outer surface of the valving member. However, whatever material is being controlled the liner member 50 is effectively protected from erosion and/or the cutting action of such material, since the material will not im pinge upon the liner when the valving member is in a throttling condition.

What is claimed is:

1. A lined valve with flow regulating means, comprising in combination: a valve body and a liner member carried thereby, each having an inlet port, an outlet port and an intermediate connecting member; a rotatable valving member in the chamber of said liner member and having a transverse port therethrough movable between a closed position and an open position, at which latter position fluid communication is provided between said body ports at selected rotated positions of said valving member, said valving member including a wall to block communication between the inlet and outlet ports upon disposition of the valving member to the closed position; said valving member having an axial bore in fluid communication with the transverse port thereof; and a hollow orifice sleeve slidingly supported within the axial bore of the valving member, said sleeve having a wall with opposite end portions, a flow control orifice in one side of said wall and an inlet orifice in another side thereof, the orifice sleeve being rotatable within the bore to selectively bring the orifices therein into and out of registry with the inlet and outlet ports of the valving member to modify the flow of fluid through the aforesaid ports of the valve body, and cooperative adjustable interlocking means on the orifice sleeve and the valve body to fix the orifice sleeve in selected rotated position within the bore, the pressure drop occurring between the inlet and outlet ports incident to rotation of the valving member being confined between adjacent edges of the ports of the valving member and the orifices of the sleeve to thus prevent damage to the liner.

2. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein means is connected with said valving member for effecting axial rotation of the valving member between the open and closed positions. 7

3. The valve as defined by claim 2, wherein said interlocking means includes means accessible exteriorly of the valve body for effecting adjustment of said orifice sleeve.

4. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein the interlocking means which is carried by the valve body, is selectively detachable from said body.

5. The valve as defined by claim I, wherein the orifice sleeve is bodily displaceable from the axial bore of the valving member.

6. The valve as defined by claim 3, wherein the orifice sleeve is bodily displaceable from the axial bore of the valving member.

7. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein the interlocking means is exterior of the valve body.

8. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein said flow control orifice of the sleeve is disposed closer to the outlet port than to the inlet port of the valve body.

9. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein said orifice sleeve is in the form of a hollow cylinder having a wall with opposite end portions, and the flow control orifice thereof comprises an aperture pattern in the cylinder wall, said aperture pattern being constricted in size in one direction circumferentially of the cylinder.

10. The valve as defined by claim 9, wherein said interlocking means for precluding rotation of the orifice sleeve is located at one end portion only of the cylinder wall.

11. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein the valve body has an opening therein axially aligned with the orifice sleeve, said opening being dimensioned to permit axial sliding of the orifice sleeve therethrough to a location outside the limits of the valve body; and a base member displaceably mounted upon the valve body to close the opening last mentioned.

12. The valve as defined by claim 11, wherein said interlocking means for precluding rotation of the orifice sleeve, includes a restraining element carried by said displaceable base member.

13. The valve as defined by claim 12, wherein said orifice sleeve is in the form of a hollow cylinder having a wall with opposite end portions, and the flow control orifice thereof comprises an aperture pattern in the cylinder wall designed to establish a predetermined flow characteristic.

14. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein the flow control orifice in said sleeve is sized and contoured to effect said modification of flow in accordance with predetermined characteristics.

15. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein said liner is of a material of the class of polytetraflouroethylene.

16. The valve as defined by claim 8, wherein said liner is of a material having the characteristics of selflubrication, low porosity, and corrosion and wear resistance.

17. The valve as defined by claim 16, wherein the combination includes self-lubricating non-metallic bearing means interposed in the axial bore of the valving member in substantial contact with said flow control means.

18. The valve as defined by claim 5, wherein the combination includes self-lubricating non-metallic bearing means interposed in the axial bore of the valving member in substantial contact with said orifice sleeve; and said liner comprises a self-lubricating nonmetallic bearing means located within said intermediate chamber in substantial contact with the valving member.

19. The valve as defined by claim 14, wherein said interlocking means includes means accessible exteriorly of the valve body.

20. The valve as defined by claim 1, wherein the interlocking means which is carried by the valve body, is

selectively de achable frgm said body.

21. A me valve wit flow regu atmg means comprising in combination: a valve body and a liner member carried thereby, each having an inlet port, an outlet port, and an intermediate connecting chamber; a rotatable valving member in the chamber of said liner member having a transverse port therethrough movable between a closed position and an open position, at which latter position fluid communication is provided between said body and liner ports at selected rotated positions of said valving member, said valving member including a wall to block communication between the inlet and outlet ports upon disposition of the valving member to closed position; said valving member having an axial bore in fluid communication with the transverse port thereof; and flow control means disposed within the axial bore of the valving member having ports therein to modify the flow of fluid through the aforesaid ports of the liner member and valve body; and cooperative interlocking means comprising complementary interfitting portions on the flow control means and the valve body to fix the flow control means relative to said liner member and body within the bore of said valving member, said locking means being accessible only interiorly of the valve body.

22. A valve as defined in claim 21, wherein said interlocking means includes means on an end of said flow control means and an adjacent surface of the valve body.

23. A lined valve as defined in claim 21, wherein the ports of said flow control means are disposed in substantial alignment with the inlet and outlet ports of the valve body adjacent the connecting chamber thereof, whereby the pressure drop occuring between said inlet and outlet ports incident to rotation of the valving member between open and closed positions is confined between adjacent edges of the ports of the valving member and flow control means.

24. A lined valve with flow regulating means comprising in combination: a valve body having an inlet port, an outlet port and an intermediate connecting chamber; a liner member in said chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port and an intermediate connecting chamber for supporting a rotatable valving member; a rotatable valving member in the chamber of said liner member; a flow cage receivable within said valving member, said valving member and flow cage having a transverse port therethrough; complementary interengaging means on the flow cage and the interior of the valve body for locking said flow cage against rotational movement, and means for rotating the valving member between and relative to said liner member and flow cage.

25. A lined valve as called for in claim 24, wherein the inlet and outlet ports of the flow cage are disposed relative to the inlet and outlet ports of the liner member whereby pressure drop induced in said chamber when the valving member is in throttling positions is restricted to the port defining edges of the flow cage and valving member, and wherein a seal is provided between adjacent surfaces of the liner and valving member when said valving member is in fully open and fully closed positions.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4079745 *May 17, 1976Mar 21, 1978Kabushiki Kaisha Takada SeisakushoValves for regulating flow rate
US4150692 *Feb 8, 1977Apr 24, 1979Weinheimer Gummiwerke GmbhValve for closing, throttling or regulating
US4273152 *Feb 9, 1979Jun 16, 1981Freeman Murray EControl valve assembly with onstream seal removal feature
US4989833 *Dec 21, 1989Feb 5, 1991Neles OyMethod for changing the characteristic curve of a regulation valve under pressure and a regulation valve
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Classifications
U.S. Classification137/614.17, 137/630, 137/637.5, 251/207, 137/630.21
International ClassificationF16K5/00, F16K5/10, F16K5/02
Cooperative ClassificationF16K5/0264, F16K5/0207, F16K5/10
European ClassificationF16K5/02J2, F16K5/10, F16K5/02B