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Publication numberUS3700384 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 24, 1972
Filing dateMar 25, 1971
Priority dateMar 25, 1971
Publication numberUS 3700384 A, US 3700384A, US-A-3700384, US3700384 A, US3700384A
InventorsGardel Robert, Gorsky Egon
Original AssigneeMattel Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ballerina doll
US 3700384 A
Abstract
A hand-operated doll having animated leg, arm and head movement. The movements of the doll simulate those of a ballet dancer. The leg and arm movement is synchronized to have a leg raised while the arms are moving downward toward the leg and to have the arms raised as the leg moves downward to a vertical position. The doll is rotated on the toe of the other leg. A head spotting mechanism is provided for controlling the rotation of the head as a function of the rotation of the torso.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

, United States Patent Gardel et al.

[54] BALLERINA DOLL [72] Inventors: Robert Gardel, New York, N.Y.;

Egon Got-sky, Westfield, NJ.

[73] Assignee: Mattel, Inc., Hawthorne, Calif.

[22] Filed: March 25, 1971 [21'] Appl. No.: 127,910

[52] US. Cl. 46/136 [51] int. Cl. ..A63h 13/02 [58] Field of Search ..46/ 136, 247

1 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,597,878 8/1971 Iwasaki 46/136 3,61 1,625 10/1971 Sloop et a] ..46/247 llm, ggll Lu 4 1 Oct. 24, 1972 3,267,608 8/ 1966 Ryan ..46/247 Primary Examiner-Louis G. Mancene Assistant Examiner-J. Q. Lever Attorney-Seymour A. Scholnick ABSTRACT trolling the rotation of the head as a function of the rotation of the torso.

11 Claims, 15 Drawing Figures PATENTEDucI24 me I 3,700,384

SHEET 1 BF 5 rrow/7 BALLERINA DOLL I This invention relates to an animated doll, and more particularly, to an animated ballerina doll.

There are various types of animated dolls available. The most common of these types is walking dolls. More recently, dolls have been developed which simulate the movements of a ballet dancer. These dolls can be rotated on one leg and the other leg will be raised and lowered during the rotational movement. These dolls have generally been battery powered.

The doll of this invention will also simulate the movements of a ballet dancer. However, the leg and arm movements have been synchronized to give a more lifelike appearance to the doll during use. Thus, in use the doll will be rotated around one leg while the other leg is raised and lowered. During the raising and lowering of the other leg, the arms will also be raised and lowered at the same time. As the leg is raised the arms are lowered and as the leg 'is lowered the arms are raised. The doll is hand actuated, and there are no electric motors or batteries necessary to operate the doll.

Another feature of the doll of this invention resides in the provision of a unique spotting mechanism. When a live ballerina is making turns, as in a pirouette, her head will face forward as long as possible and spot an object in front of her. This facilitates her maintaining her balance during the turns. After the rest of her body has been rotated, she will snap her head around and quickly face forward again.

In prior ballerina dolls, spotting mechanisms were used in order to maintain the forward position of the head for as long as possible during the rotation of the rest of the doll. Thereafter, the head would snap around and rotate with the balance of the doll until the head again faced forward. Thus, the spotting technique of a ballerina is simulated by this mechanism. The mechanism generally used in the prior art dolls comprised a torsion spring which maintained the forward position of the head until the tension on the spring was released, thereby snapping the head around. In the doll of this invention, a unique spotting mechanism is provided which does not require the use of any springs. The spotting technique is naturally carried out during the rotation of the doll, and accurately follows the technique used by a live ballerina.

It is accordingly an object of this invention to provide a novel ballerina doll.

It is a further object of this invention to providea ballerina doll having a novel spotting mechanism.

These and other objects of this invention are accomplished by providing an animated doll comprising a torso, a pair of legs, a pair of arms and a head, means for rotating said doll on one of said legs, means for raising and lowering the other of said legs, and means for raising and lowering said arms while said other of said legs is being raised and lowered.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a doll embodying the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the doll of FIG. 1, with parts shown in phantom to illustrate the movement of the arms and one of the legs;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary front sectional view of the doll of this invention, with parts shown in elevation;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken along the line 4-4"of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a partial rear elevational view taken in the direction of the line 5-5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken along the line 7-7 of FIG. 5; p

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the shown in FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view taken along the line 9-9 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken along the line 10- 10 of FIG. 4;

gear assembly FIG. 11 is a sectional view taken along the line 11- 11 of FIG. 10;

FIG. 12 is a sectional view taken along the line 12- 12 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 13 is a sectional view taken along the line 13- 13 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a side sectional view, partially in elevation, showing a first position for the feet of the doll of this invention; and

FIG. 15 is a side sectional view, partially in elevation, and showing a second position for the feet of the doll of this invention.

Referring now in greater detail to the various figures of the drawings wherein like reference characters refer to like parts, a doll embodying the present invention is generally shown at 20 in FIG. 1. Doll 20 basically comprises a torso 22, a head 24, a pair of arms 26 and 28 and a pair of legs 30 and 32 which depend from and support the torso.

The animation of the doll is carried out by rotating knob 34 which is secured on the top of shaft 36 that passes vertically through the head 24 of the doll. Continued rotation of the knob causes the doll to rotate about the toes of the left foot 32 in a clockwise direction. This causes the alternate raising and lowering of leg 30 and the alternate raising and lowering of arms 26 and 28 in unison. The movement of the arms and the leg is shown by arrows 38 and 40, respectively, in FIG. 2. The arms are movable for a position which is inclined upwardly to a position which is inclined downwardly, which is shown at 26 in FIG. 2. Likewise, the leg 30 is movable from the vertical position shown in FIG. 1 to a substantially horizontal position. An in termediate position during the movement of the leg 30 is shown at 30' in FIG. 2.

The construction of doll 20 is best seen in connection with FIGS. 3 through 15. As seen in FIGS. 4 and 6, torso 22 comprises a hollow shell which is preferably molded of plastic. Any of the plastics known to the art can be used for this purpose. The shell 22 includes a rectangular opening in the rear thereof, which opening is bordered by a lip 42. A compartment 44 is positioned within shell 22. Compartment 44 includes a peripheral flange 46 around the edge thereof (FIG. 5). As-seen in FIGS. 4, 5 and 6, the compartment 44 is placed in shell 22 by passing the compartment through the rear opening and securing the peripheral flange 46 to the lip 42 of the shell by any suitable fasteners, such as screws 48 (FIG. 5).

Compartment 44 is rectangular in cross section, and includes a bottom wall, a top wall 50 (FIG. 6), a front wall 52 (FIG. 9) and side walls 54 and 56 (FIG. 9). As seen in FIG. 3, shaft 36 is formed in two portions, an upper portion and a lower portion, which portions are joined by a sleeve 58 having set screws 60 therein which engage the two portions of the shaft. As seen in FIG. 5, the lower portion of the shaft 36 passes through the top and bottom walls of compartment 44, and is accessible from the rear of the doll. As seen in FIG. 3, a bearing sleeve 62 is keyed to the shaft 36 adjacent the bottom thereof, and abuts the bottom wall of compartment 44. The bearing sleeve 62 limits the upward movement of the shaft 36.

Referring now to FIGS. and 9, it is seen that shaft 36 has a square cross section. A plastic disc 64 is keyed to shaft 36 and is positioned at the bottom of compartment 44. Disc 64 passes through a slot in the front wall 52 of the compartment (see also FIG. 4). Disc 64 is molded from a resilient plastic, such as nylon.

A finger 66 having a pointed end 68 is pivotally mounted in compartment 44 within bracket 70. Bracket 70 includes a leg 72 (FIG. 3) which passes through the bottom wall 74 of compartment 44, which leg is secured to flange 46 by nut, bolt and washer assembly 76 (see FIGS. 3, 5 and 9). Finger 66 is pivotally mounted around pin 78 which passes through the finger and is secured in bracket 70. A coiled spring 80 encircles pin 78, and urges finger 66 into contact with disc 64 at the circumference thereof.

As seen in FIGS. 5 and 9, a bracket 82 is mounted on bottom wall 74 of compartment 44 by suitable fasteners 84. Additional stability is given to the bracket by a brace 86 which is also mounted on bottom wall 74. Shaft 36 passes through bracket 82 before passing through disc 64. A suitable bearing sleeve 88 is placed in the hole of bracket 84 through which the shaft36 passes. Shaft 36 is rotatably mounted within the bearing sleeve 88, and the bracket 82 helps to maintain the alignment of the shaft within the doll.

As seen in FIG. 5, an elongated brace 90 is mounted against the top wall 50 of compartment 44 by suitable fasteners 92. Brace 90 includes a substantially U- shaped depression 94 at its center on which an L- shaped brace 96 is secured by rivet 98 (see also FIG. 8). As seen in FIG. 8, a bracket 100 is secured to the vertical leg of L-shaped bracket 96 by screw 102 (FIG. 5). As seen in FIG. 8, shaft 36 passes through bracket 100, and has a worm gear 104 mounted thereon within bracket 100. Worm gear 104 meshes with a spur gear 106 which is horizontally mounted within bracket 100. A horizontal shaft 108 passes through gear 106 which is keyed thereto. Shaft 108 is rotatably mounted in bearing sleeves 110 (FIG. 5) which are mounted in the side walls 54 and 56 of compartment 44.

Referring to FIG. 3, it is seen that the front wall 52 of compartment 44 has an opening 1 12 therein, rendering a portion of the interior of the compartment visible in the front sectional view of FIG. 3. Shaft 108 passes through the wall 56 of compartment 44 and has a disc 114 keyed thereon on the exterior side of wall 56. As seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, a pin 116 is secured in disc 114, and a bar 118 is rotatably mounted on pin 116, and secured in place by a cotter pin 120. The lower end of bar 118 is rotatably mounted on a pin 122 which is secured on a U-shaped bracket 124. The bar is secured in place by any suitable means, such as a cotter pin 1 26.

As seen in FIGS. 4 and 10, a U-shaped bracket 128 having a bottom horizontal leg 130 and upstanding vertical legs 132 is mounted in torso 22 between legs 30 and 32. A shaft 134 passes through aligned holes in legs 132 and is mounted in the front and rear sides of torso shell 22. A second U-shaped bracket 136 having a bottomhorizontal leg 138 and upstanding vertical legs 140 and 142 is secured on bracket 128 by screws 144. Bracket 136 is used to rigidly secure bracket 128 within the doll. Thus, leg 140 is secured to the flange 46 of compartment 44 by a screw 146 (FIGS. 3 and 4). As seen in FIG. 4, appropriate nuts 148 secure the screw in place.

As seen in FIG. 3, a pair of spaced legs 150 depend from horizontal leg 130 of bracket 128, and are unitary therewith. As seen in FIG. 10, a shaft 152 passes through legs 150, through bracket 124, and into the interior of the doll leg 30. A vertically extending plate 154 (FIGS. 3 and 10) is secured on the bracket 124. Shaft 152 passes through plate 154, and is secured in place through the use of an enlarged head 156 and a pin 158 (FIG. 10).

Plate 154 is positioned adjacent an opening 160 in torso 22. The purpose of opening 160 is to provide a space for the attachment of leg 30 in place. A similar opening 160 is also provided for leg 32, as seen in FIG. 10. Plate 154 includes three equally spaced projecting beads 162 thereon (FIG. 10). A disc 164 is mounted on leg 30, which leg is hollow and formed from a molded plastic. Disc 164 includes three equally spaced recesses which are alignable with beads 162, and which receive the beads therein. A washer 166 is positioned within leg 30, and bears against the interior of disc 164. Shaft 152 passes through washer 166. A spring 168 is telescoped over the shaft 152 within leg 30, and is secured in place by a nut 170 that is threadedly secured on the end of the shaft.

It is seen by reference to FIG. 10 that leg 30 is resiliently mounted relative to plate 154. The alignment of the leg relative to the plate is maintained by the engagement of beads 162 in the aligned notches or depressions in disc 164 and the pressure of the spring 168 against the disc 164. The purpose of the resilient mounting is to permit the leg 30 to be rotated from the vertical position shown in FIG. 1 to a position 120 in a counterclockwise direction from that shown in FIG. 1. As is apparent in FIG. 10, and as will be explained in further detail hereinafter, leg 32 is also movable through this 120 of rotation. The purpose of having the resilient mounting for the leg and the detents to pemiit the leg to be moved exactly 120 is to permit the doll to be placed in either the standing position shown in FIG. 1 or a sitting position. This mechanism for permitting the movement of the legs is disclosed in greater detail in our copending application Ser. No. 866,953, filed Oct. 16, 1969, and in and of itself, forms no part of this invention. However, the feature is useful to the doll of this invention.

Bracket 124 is rotatable about shaft 152. Since leg 30 is resiliently engaged with the bracket 124 through the use of plate 154, disc 164 and spring 168, when the bracket 124 is rotated about shaft 152, the leg 30 will also be rotated in the same manner.

The securement of leg 32 on the torso 22 is best seen by reference to FIGS. and 11. As seen in FIG. 10, a U-shaped bracket 172, which is similar to bracket 124, is provided. Since many of the elements used for the mounting of leg 32 are identical to those used for the mounting of leg 30, the same reference characters will be used. Thus, a plate 154 is secured on U-shaped bracket 172. The three equally spaced beads 162 are shown in phantom in FIG. 11. These beads are received in recesses in disc 164. A shaft 174 passes through bracket 172 and into the interior of leg 32. A spacer 176 is telescoped over the shaft and is positioned within bracket 172. The leg 32 is resiliently mounted in place through the use of a washer .166, a spring 168 and a nut 170 threadedly securedon the end of shaft 174.

As pointed out above, leg 32 is rotatable from the vertical position shown in FIG. 1 to a position 120 upward and in the front of the doll in order to enable the doll to be placed in a sitting position. However, with the exception of this sitting feature used for the leg 32, the leg 32 is rigidly mounted with respect to the remainder of the doll. In this connection, a pair of shafts 178 is secured in legs 150 and passes through bracket 172 (FIG. 10). The legs also pass through plate 154 associated with bracket 172 and are secured in place by cotter pins 180. Spacers 182 are positioned between the left-hand leg 150 and bracket 172.

As pointed out above, bracket 128 is rigidly mounted within torso 22. Bracket 172 is in turn rigidly mounted to bracket 128 through the use of shafts 178. Accordingly, the leg 32 is rigidly mounted with respect to the remainder of the doll, with the exception of the rotational feature in order to obtain a sitting position.

Referring again to FIG. 4, it is seen that a rod 184 is pivotally linked to bracket 124 by a pin 186. As seen in FIG. 4, rod 184 passes through an opening in the bottom of compartment 44, follows a bent path within the compartment, and as seen in FIG. 4, leaves the compartment through opening 112 in wall 52 of the compartment. As seen in FIG. 5, a washer 188 is telescoped over rod 184, and abuts the top surface of bottom wall 74 of compartment 44. A spring 190 is telescoped over rod 184, and bears against the top surface of washer 188. A second washer 192 bears against the top surface of spring 190, and is secured in place by a crimp 194 made in rod 184. Spring 190 is a coiled compression spring, and exerts an upward pressure on rod 184 through washer 192 and crimp 194.

After passing through opening 112 in compartment 44, rod 184 extends vertically upward and terminates in a flattened end 196 (FIG. 6). As seen in FIG. 6, rod 184 is pivotally secured to a bar 198 by a pin 200 that passes through the flattened end 196. Pin 200 is secured on bar 198 by a nut 202, and the flattened end 196 is secured on the pin by an endcap 204. Bar 198 is in turn rigidly secured to an angled bar 206 by rivets 208.

As seen in FIG. 6, angled bar 206 includes a pair of terminal flanges 210. Each flange 210 includes a horizontal slot in which is received the flattened end 212 of a horizontally extending shaft 214. A cylinder 216 is positioned in the shoulder opening for each arm 26 and 28 (FIGS. 3 and 6). As best seen in FIG. 6, each cylinder 216 includes an inner annular flange 218 and an outer annular flange 220. The two flanges form a groove therebetween, and the torso shell is securely held within this groove by the flanges. A bearing sleeve 222 (FIG. 6) is positioned within a central bore of each cylinder 216. Shaft 214 is rotatably mounted within sleeve 222.

As seen in FIG. 3, a second cylinder 224 is mounted adjacent cylinder 216 on shaft 214. Cylinder 224 is keyed to shaft 214 by a pin 226 that passes through the cylinder and the shaft. An end disc 228 is formed on the end of cylinder 214, and abuts annular flange 220. A groove is formed in cylinder 224 adjacent disc 228, and hollow arms 226-and 228 are snapped into this groove, as seen in FIG. 3. The arms are resiliently held in the groove, and accordingly when shaft 214 is rotated, the cylinder 224 which is keyed thereto will also rotate. This will in turnrotate the arms which are resiliently held on the cylinder. However, when it is desired to change the disposition of the arms, they can be hand rotated within the grooves to any desired position. Thereafter, when the shafts 214 are again rotated, the arms 26 and 28 will be rotated therewith.

An elongated plate 230 FIGS. 4 and 6 is mounted on the top wall of compartment 44 by a pair of screws 232 FIGS. 3 and 6 passing through the wall from the inside thereof and extending vertically upward. The plate 230 is held in place by a pair of nuts 234 (one shown in FIG. 4). As seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, two additional plates 236 are mounted parallel to plate 230 on screws 232 by appropriate nuts 238. A bearing sleeve 240 is positioned between plates 236 at the center thereof, and a second bearing sleeve 242 is positioned on top of the uppermost plate 236. Bearing sleeve 242 includes a reduced diameter upperportion 244 (FIGS. 3 and 4). Shaft 36 is joumalled in bearing sleeves 240 and 242.

A cylinder 246 (FIG. 6) is eccentrically mounted on shaft 36. Cylinder 246 is positioned in slot 248 of plate 250. As seen in FIG. 6, the width of slot 248 is substantially equal to the diameter of cylinder 246, and the length of the slot is substantially greater than the diameter of the cylinder 246. Plate 250 also includes a rectangular slot 252 therein.

As seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, a disc 254 having a depending boss 256 is mounted on the underside of plate 250 by screws 258. The disc and boss have a rectangular slot passing therethrough, which slot is aligned with slot 252 in plate 250. The flattened end 260 of a round shaft 262 passes through the aligned slots in the boss and disc and slot 252 in plate 250. The disc and boss are formed from a resilient plastic, such as nylon, and frictionally hold the flattened end 260 of shaft 262 therein. This also maintains the shaft within slot 252.

A bracket 264 is mounted on the front wall 52 of compartment 44 by bolts 266 and associated nuts (FIGS. 3 and 4). An L-shaped bar 268 (FIG. 4) is riveted to the front face of bracket 264. Bar 268 includes an upper horizontal leg having an opening therein through which shaft 262 passes. As seen in FIG. 3, shaft 262 includes a pair of crimps 270 below bar 268. The crimps 270 prevent upward movement of the shaft 262 relative to bar 268. Downward movement of the shaft is prevented by the resilient grip of disc 254 and its associated boss 256 on the flattened portion 260.

A bracket 272 (FIGS. 3 and 4) is secured on the front wall 52 of compartment 44 by bolts 274 and associated nuts. Bracket 272 also has an L-shaped bar 276 riveted thereon at the center thereof. The bottom of shaft 262 passes through a hole in the center of the horizontal portion of bar 276 and is provided with a 90 bend leaving horizontal section 278. The two bars 268 and 276 maintain the vertical alignment of shaft 262, as best seen in FIG. 4. Shaft 262 is rotatable within the openings in bars 268 and 276.

As seen in FIGS. 4 and 13, a plate 280 having an inclined leg 282 is telescoped over bearing sleeve 242. Leg 282 includes a rectangular slot 284 therein. Flattened end 260 of shaft 262 projects through slot 284 (FIGS. 12 and 13). An elongated slot 286 (FIG. 12) is formed in the horizontal portion of plate 280. A third slot 288 is also formed in the horizontal portion of plate 280.

As seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, torso 22 includes a neck opening 290. A neck disc 292 is telescoped over bearing sleeve 242 and positioned in neck opening 290. As best seen in FIG. 13, neck disc 292 includes a lower circumferential taper 294 and an upper circumferential taper 296. A second disc 298 is secured to disc 292 by a plurality of screws 300. Head 24 is formed from a soft material, such as synthetic rubber, and includes a lower inwardly projecting lip 302 (FIG. 3). The head is secured on disc 292 by snapping the lip over disc 298, whereby the lipis received on the tapered wall 296.

Referring again to FIG. 13, it is seen that disc 292 includes an internal cavity 304 which terminates in a cylinder 306 having a central bore. The lower face of cylinder 306 abuts the top edge of the enlarged portion of bearing sleeve 242. The reduced portion 244 of bearing sleeve 242 is received within the bore of cylinder 306. The shoulder formed by the top of the enlarged portion of bearing sleeve 242 provides a stop for the downward movement of disc 292, thereby positioning the disc within the neck opening 290. Disc 292 is rotatable around reduced portion 244 and on the top edge of the enlarged portion of bearing sleeve 242. The disc is formed from a plastic material having a low coefficient of friction, such as nylon.

As seen in FIG. 13, a pin 308-having a head 310 passes through slot 288 and is received in a vertical bore passing through discs 292 and 298. Head 310 is larger in diameter than the width of slot 288, and accordingly prevents the head from passing through the slot. A washer 312 is telescoped over the pin and is positioned between the pin and the bottom of disc 292. A bearing sleeve 314 is placed in the bore of disc 292, and pin 308 is rotatably mounted within the bearing sleeve. A coiled compression spring 316 is telescoped over pin 308 and one end bears against the top of sleeve 314. A washer 318 is placed against the top of spring 316 and is held in place by a cotter pin 320. It is thus. seen by reference to FIG. 13 that plate 280 is resiliently coupled to disc 292 and 298 by pin 308 and spring 316.

In the assembly of the doll all elements are secured in place and the lower portion of shaft 36 is left uncovered. The top portion of shaft 36 is then passed through hole 322 (FIG. 3) in head 24. Since the head is formed from a compressible material, such as rubber, the head can be slid upward relative to the upper portion of shaft 36 and compressed, thereby enabling the securement of the upper and lower portions of the shaft in sleeve 58. Thereafter, the head is snapped into the groove formed by disc 298 and the upper tapered surface 296 of disc 292. Knob 34 is keyed to shaft 36, as by a cotter pin 324 (FIG. 3).

In FIGS. 14 and 15 the mechanism for mounting a foot 326 at the bottom of leg is shown. An identical mechanism is used for mounting the foot at the bottom of leg 32.

As seen in FIGS. 14 and 15, leg 30 is formed from a hollow molded plastic, and foot 326 is likewise formed from a hollow molded plastic. A bracket 328 is secured in the top of the foot. Bracket 328 includes a slot 330 that extends along substantially the entire length thereof. The structure of the bracket and the other elements linking the foot to the leg 30 is shown in detail in US. Pat. No. 2,783,587, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein. No claim is made with respect to the foot structure separate and apart from the rest of the doll disclosed herein.

A rod 332 projects upwardly into leg 30. The rod includes a T-shaped head with upwardly projecting flanges at the extremities of the cross bar of the T. This head is received within slot 330 of bracket 328. A compression spring 334 is telescoped over rod 332 and is secured at the top thereof. Spring 334 holds foot 326 resiliently against the base of leg 30.

The foot 326 is pivotable around rod 332 from the position shown in FIG. 14 to the position shown in FIG.

15. When the doll is used as a ballerina doll, the foot 326, and the foot on leg 32, will be in the position shown in FIG. 14. When the doll is not in use as a bal lerina doll, and it is desired to stand the doll on a shelf or other supporting member, the feet will be in the horizontal position shown in FIG. 15. When the feet are so positioned, the doll can be maintained in a vertical self-supporting position.

The doll of this invention is used as a ballerina by pivoting the feet to the position shown in FIG. 14, whereby the toes are pointed downwardly, in the same manner as would be done by a ballerina. Knob 34 is then grasped in one hand and the doll is tilted slightly to the left, thereby placing all of the weight of the doll on the toes of the left foot. This slightly raises the right foot off the supporting surface on which the left foot is placed. Thereafter, knob 34 is rapidly rotated in a clockwise direction in a convenient amount and then stopped and manually held against rotation. This will in turn cause shaft 36, which is keyed to the knob, to rotate in a clockwise direction.

Referring now to FIG. 9, it is seen that the rotation of shaft 36 in a clockwise direction tends to rotate resilient disc 64 in a clockwise direction, in view of the fact that the disc is keyed to the shaft. However, the rotation of disc 64, by the engagement of edge 68 of finger 66 into the circumference of the disc, causes corresponding rotation of the torso of the doll, thereby causing the doll to rotate in a clockwise direction with the shaft, utilizing the toes of the left foot as a pivot point. Then when the knob 34 and shaft 36 are stopped and held against rotation, the inertia of the torso and the parts mounted therein cause the torso and the remainder of the doll to rotate around stationary shaft 36. Relative rotation between the torso and shaft now cause spur gear 106 to rotate in a clockwise direction, as viewed in FIGS. 7 and 8. The rotation of the spur gear will in turn cause shaft 108 to rotate ina clockwise direction.

Referring'to FIG. 4, it is seen that the rotation of I shaft 108 in a clockwise direction will in turn cause disc 114 to rotate in a clockwise direction. This will in turn cause pin 116 to rotate in a clockwise direction along with the disc. Bar 118 is pivotally mounted on pin 116, and accordingly as the pin is rotated the bar 118 will be raised and lowered during a complete revolution of the pin. As seen in FIG. 4, as the bar 118 is raised by the rotation of pin 116, the bottom end of the bar will also be raised. This will in turn cause the raising of pin 122 and bracket 124. The pin and bracket will accordingly be pivoted in a counterclockwise direction around shaft 152.

Referring to FIG. 10, it is seen that as the bracket 124 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction around shaft 152, leg 30 will likewise be rotated in the same direction in view of the fact that the leg is secured to the bracket. Accordingly, the leg 30 will be raised from the vertical position shown in FIG. 1 to a substantially horizontal position, as indicated by arrows 40 in FIG. 2. As the bracket 124 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in FIG. 4, rod 184 which is pivotally linked to bracket 124 on the other side of shaft 152 will be pulled downwardly. This in turn will cause the downward movement of bar 206, which is linked to rod 184 by bar 198 and pin 200.

Referring to FIGS. 3 and 6, it is seen that I the downward movement of rod .184 will thus rotate bar 206 in a clockwise direction. The rotation of the bar in a clockwise direction will in turn rotate shafts 214 in a clockwise direction in view of the fact that the shafts are keyed to bar. 206 through flattened ends 212. It

should be recalled that shoulder cylinders 216 are rigidly fixed in the shoulder openings of the torso, and the shafts 214 are rotatably mounted in the shoulder cylinders. Accordingly, as the shafts 214 are rotated in a clockwise direction, the 'arms 26 and 28 will be rotated downwardly, as indicated by arrows 38 in FIG. 2.

It should be recalled that the motion of the raising of the leg 30 and the lowering of the arms 26 and 28 are being accomplished as the torso 22 and the remainder of the doll are rotating. Thus, during one phase of the rotation of the doll the leg 30 is being raised and the arms 26 and 28 are being lowered in the direction of the rising leg while the doll is rotating on leg 32.

Referring again to FIGS. 7 and 8, it is seen that as the doll continues to rotate relative to shaft 36, the spur gear 106 will continue to rotate. This in turn will continue the clockwise rotation of disc 114 (FIG. 4). The continued rotation of the disc 114 will initially cause bar 118 to rise until the pin has been rotated an additional 90. At this point, leg 30 will be raised to its highest position, and arms 26 and 28 will be lowered to their lowest position. As the disc I114 continues to rotate, bar 118 will begin to lower.

As the bar 118 is lowered, bracket 124 will be rotated in a clockwise direction, as seen in FIG. 4. This will in turn cause the lowering of leg 30, as indicated by arrows 40 in FIG. 2. At the same time, rod 184 will begin to rise, thereby raising bar 206. This in turn will cause the counterclockwise rotation of shafts 214, thereby rotating arms 26 and 28 in a counterclockwise direction. Thus, as the leg 30 is lowered, the arms 26 and 28 will be raised toward the position shown in full line in FIG. 2.

Once the initial rotational force is applied to the doll by the rotational force applied to shaft 36, and due to the nature of the engagement of edge 68 on the circumference of disc 64, the doll will continue to rotate freely about the toes on leg 32. The rotational momentum is maintained by periodically rotating knob 34, first in a counterclockwise direction and then in a clockwise direction, to add additional rotational force. In this connection, it should be noted that each time the knob 34 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction the disc 64 will rotate freely in the same direction. Accordingly, the motion of the doll relative to the shaft is always in the same direction, namely, clockwise. The combined effect of disc 64 and finger 66 is that of a ratchet and pawl system. The advantage of the resilient disc over a ratchet wheel is that the clicking; sound of the ratchet wheel is eliminated. However, the disc will function in exactly the same manner as a ratchet wheel in view of the fact that the finger can make sufficient penetration into the resilient disc to prevent clockwise rotation of the disc. So long as the doll is rotating relative to the shaft, the spur gear 106 will turn in a clockwise direction, thereby maintaining the movement of the arms andleg as the doll is rotating. Obviously, during periodic counterclockwise rotations of shaft 36, while the doll is rotating clockwise, the speed of swinging movement of the arms and legs is increased. Conversely, periodic rotations of the shaft 36 clockwise causes arm and leg swinging movements to stop even though the torso is rotating, thus giving the operator the ability to introduce interesting variations in the described movements.

Merely by pivoting the wrist, a child can maintain the rotational movement of the doll indefinitely. Thus, each time the knob 34 is rotated counterclockwise and then rotated an equal amount in a clockwise direction, a sufficient force is imparted to the doll to obtain at least one full revolution for the doll. The motion of the doll can be maintained without the use of any batterypowered motors or electric motors. Of course, it should be understood that if desired, the doll of this invention can be operated by utilizing a battery powered motor. In this case, the child would merely hold the knob 34, and actuate the motor in order to obtain the desired movements for the doll.

Referring again to FIGS. 4 and 5, it is seen that as bracket 124 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction, thereby raising leg 30, rod 184 will be lowered. This in turn will compress spring (FIG. 5). Thus, as the arms 26 and 28 are lowered and the leg 30 is raised, the spring 190 will be compressed. However, when the leg 30 is lowered, and the arms 26 and 28 are to be raised, the spring 190 will expand. This expansion and contraction of the spring adds stability to the movement of the arms and leg, and in addition, aids in the raising of the arms by providing an additional force for the raising of the arms.

An alternative method of operating the doll arises from the fact that the downward extensions of the axis of shaft 36 is displaced laterally from the point of contact between the toe of leg 30 and the floor. By grasping knob 34 and holding the same against rotation about the axis of shaft 36, the knob and torso can be operated like a crank to cause rotation of the. torso relative to the shaft and about a generally upright axis passing through the point of contact between the right toe and the floor. Thus a uniform speed of operation may be achieved, with the capability of introducing variations by partially rotating shaft 36 when and in whatever direction desired.

An alternative method of operating the doll arises from the fact that the downward extensions of the axis of shaft 36 is displaced laterally from the point of contact between the toe of leg 30 and the floor. By grasping knob 34 and holding the same against rotation about the axis ,of shaft 36, the knob and torso can be operated like a crank to cause rotation of the torso relative to the shaft and about a generally upright axis passing through the point of contact between the right toe and the floor. Thus a uniform speed of operation may be achieved, with the capability of introducing variations by partially rotating shaft 36 when and in whatever direction desired.

In addition to the arm and leg raising and lowering movements and the twirling movement of the doll, the doll also possesses a spotting means. As pointed out above, when a ballerina goes through a whirling movement, as in a pirouette, she will spot on an object in front of her, and maintain her stare on the object as long as possible. Thus, the remainder of her body will spin first while the head remains facing in a fixed direction.

Thereafter, she will snap her head around as quickly as possible in order to bring it back to the forward position. This aids in the maintaining of her stability during the whirling movements.

The spotting mechanism of the doll of this invention is best seen in FIGS. 3, 4, 6, 12 and 13. As seen in FIG. 3, head 24 is secured on discs 292 and 298. Accordingly, the head will only move whenever these discs move. Referring to FIG. 13, it is seen that drive shaft 36 passes through bearing sleeve 242, on which the discs are rotatable, and the shaft is freely rotatable within the bearing sleeve. Accordingly, any rotation of the shaft 36 will initially have no effect on the position of the head 24 in view of the fact that the shaft is freely rotatable in the bearing sleeve on which the head is mounted. The initial rotation of the torso 22 will not affect the positionof the head 24 at the time the torso is initially rotated since the position of the head will appear to remain stationary.

Referring to FIG. 6, it is seen that plate 250 will rotate along with the torso 22. Additionally, plate 250 will oscillate about a pivot point formed by flattened end 260 of shaft 262 at the same time the plate is rotating along with the torso 22. The oscillation is caused by the movement of the plate 250 relative to cylinder 246 which is keyed to shaft 36. Thus, plate 250 will always move in a clockwise direction relative to shaft 36 and shaft 36 will always move in a counterclockwise direction relative to plate 250. This movement is caused by the ratchet and pawl type of arrangement of disc 64 and finger 66.

Referring again to FIG. 6, it is seen that as the plate 250 moves in a clockwise direction around cylinder 246, the plate will initially be rotated in a counterclockwise direction around shaft 262 by the bearing of the cylinder 246 against the bottom wall of slot 248. Thus, as is apparent from FIG. 6, the cylinder 246 is eccentrically mounted on shaft 36. Continued rotation of the torso 22 relative to cylinder 246 will eventually bring the cylinder into the elongated righthand portion of slot 248. At this point the plate 250 will be in the same position as is shown in FIG. 6 relative to the torso. Further rotation of the torso relative to cylinder 246 will bring the eccentric portion of cylinder 246 against the top side of slot 248, as viewed in FIG. 6. This will rotate the plate 250 in a clockwise direction relative to flattened end 260 of shaft 262. A further rotation of the torso will bring the eccentric portion of the cylinder 246 back to the position shown in FIG. 6.

Referring to FIGS. 12 and 13, it is seen that the oscillation of the plate 250 around flattened end 260 of shaft 262 will also oscillate the flattened end of the shaft (see also FIG. 6). This is caused by the fact that the flattened end 260 is keyed to plate 250 within slot 252. As the flattened end 260 oscillates back and forth under the movement of the plate 250, plate 280 will oscillate in a like manner. This is because the flattened end 260 is keyed to plate 280 within slot 284. Slot 286 is formed in plate 280 to prevent any contact between plate 280 and bearing sleeve 242 as the plate is oscillated back and forth.

As seen in FIG. 13, discs 292 and 298, which support head 24, are rotatably mounted on pin 308. Pin 308 passes through a slot 288 in plate 280. Accordingly, as the plate 280 is oscillated, it will cause pin 308 to oscillate about a center at the flattened end 260 of shaft 262. As the pin 308 is oscillated it will first rotate disc 292 and 298 in a counterclockwise direction, and then in a clockwise direction. Slot 288 is provided to permit the complete oscillation of the pin 308. Thus, since flattened end 260 of shaft 262 provides a pivot point fixed relative to the torso, and since the pin will be brought closer and farther away from this fixed pivot point as the plate 280 is oscillated, the slot 288 is provided to accommodate any movement of the pin relative to the pivot point. The discs 292 and 298 are formed from a plastic having a low coefficient of friction, such as nylon, and are freely rotatable about the bearing sleeve 242.

Referring again to FIGS. 3 and 6, it is seen that in the initial or starting position of the doll prior to the dancing motion, the head 24 faces forward and the eccentric portion of cylinder 246 faces rearwardly within the elongated portion of slot 248. During the first 90 of rotation of the torso 22 in a clockwise direction, the plate 250 will likewise rotate 90. At the same time the plate is rotating, it is oscillating in a counterclockwise direction under the urging of the eccentric portion of cylinder 246. Accordingly, while the torso is rotating in a clockwise direction, the head 24 will be caused to rotate in a counterclockwise direction. This has the net effect or maintaining the head looking forwardly as the dollisrotatedinaclockwise direction.

During the next 90 of rotation of the torso, the eccentric portion of the cylinder 246 moves into the forward elongated portion of the slot 248. Thus, at this time the counterclockwise oscillation of the plate 250 is terminated and the head 24 begins to rotate at the same speed as the rest of the doll. During the next 90 of rotation of the torso, the eccentric portion 246 causes the rotation of plate 250 in a clockwise direction. The net effect of this is th'atnot only will the head 24 rotate with the rest of thedoll, it will actually rotate at a faster rate of speed in view of the fact that it is being rotated by the movement of the flattened end 260 of shaft 262. When the doll has made a complete revolution, the eccentric portion of cylinder 246 will be in the position shown in FIG. 6, and the dolls head will again be facing forwardly.

The result of the .movementsof the head 24 is that the head will initially be facing forward as the doll is first rotated, will thereafter rotate in the same direction and at the same speed as the rest of the doll, and will ultimately rotate at a faster speed than the rest of the doll in order to have the head aligned with the rest of the doll. This movement simulates the actual movements of a ballerina during her spotting routine.

The amount that the leg 30 is raised and the amount of raising and loweringof the arms 26 and 28 are controlled by the positioning of the pins 122 and 186 on bracket 124 (FIG. 4). Thus, the closer the pin 122 is to pivot shaft 152, the greater the amount leg 30 will be raised. Likewise, the closer pin 186 is to pivot shaft 152, the greater the amount of movement of arms 26 and 28. In a preferred embodiment of the doll of this invention, the leg 30 will be raised from the vertical position shown in FIGS 1 and 2 through an arc of 90 to a substantially horizontal position. The arms 26 and 28 can be moved from a substantially vertical position over the head down through an arc of approximately 170 to a point where they will almost touch leg 30 at the time the leg is raised. Of course, it should be understood, that the amount of rotation of the arms and leg is purely a matter of choice and can be varied to suit the needs of the user.

One of the features of the doll of this invention is that the arms 26 and 28 need not be rotatably mounted on an axis which is transverse to a longitudinal axis through the center of the doll. In other words, because the rotation of the arms is accomplished through bar 206 instead of through a shaft extending transversely across the doll, the angle of rotation of the arms can be varied. In this connection, it can be seen by reference to FIG. 6 that the shoulder cylinders 216 are shown as being mounted substantially parallel to each other. However, these cylinders can be inclined toward each other as they face forward in order to have the arms approach each other as they are raised or lowered. Likewise, if it is desired to have the arms move away from each other, the shoulder cylinders 216 can be inclined away from each other as they face forward. This variation in rotation is easily accomplished since the oscillating bar 206 can rotate the shafts 214 regardless of the angle of the shafts relative to the bar.

It should also be understood that although many of the body elements of the doll have been shown as being open for the purpose of clarity, the actual doll body completely contains and encloses the mechanism of the doll. Thus, a cover plate can be placed over the back of compartment 44 thereby sealing the same. Additionally, clothing will be provided for the doll which is similar to a ballerinas clothing.

Without further elaboration, the foregoing will so fully illustrate our invention that others may, by applying current or future knowledge, readily adapt the same for use under various conditions of service.

What is claimed as the invention is:

l. A doll comprising:

a torso; y

a pair of legs mounted on said torso, at least one of saidlegs beingmounted for upward and downward swinging movement and the other of said legs having means thereon for supporting said doll, when in a generally upright position, on a supporting surface for free rotation about a generally upright axis;

a pair of arms swingably mounted on said torso for having manually graspable means thereon exteriorally of said head; and means for drivingly connecting said shaft to said torso in one direction while permitting free rotation of said torso relative to said shaft in said one direction.

3. A doll as defined in claim 2 wherein said lastnamed means comprises a disc fixed on said shaft and a generally pointed finger pivotally mounted on said torso with its generally pointed end engaging the periphery of said disc to serve as aratchet connection between said shaft and torso.

4. The doll of claim 2 wherein said actuating means includes a bracket supporting said one leg, said bracket being pivotally mounted with respect to said torso, bar means pivotally linked to said bracket, and means responsive to rotation of said shaft to cause the raising and lowering of said bar means, thereby pivotally reciprocating said bracket on which said one leg is secured, and thereby raising and lowering said one leg.

5. The doll of claim 4 and further including arrn bracket means, each of said anns being keyed to a rotatably mounted shaft which is keyed to said arm bracket means, rod means being pivotally linked to said leg bracket and to said arm bracket means, said rod means being linked to said leg bracket on the side of the pivotal point which is opposite to the pivotal securement of said bar means, whereby the pivotal reciprocation of said leg bracket will cause the raising and lowering of said arms.

6. The doll of claim 5 and further including compression spring means which bear against said rod means, said spring means being compressed when said arms are lowered and said spring means being expanded when said arms are raised.

7. The doll of claim 2 and further including head spotting means responsive to relative rotation between said torso and shaft, which head spotting means controls rotation of said head about said generally upright axis as a function of the rotation of said torso.

8. The doll of claim 7 wherein said head spotting means causes said head to initially rotate, relative to said torso, in a direction opposite: to the direction of rotation of said torso, and said head spotting means further causes said head to rotate in the same direction as said torso, but at a faster rotational rate of speed, when said torso has been rotated through a predetermined distance.

9; The doll of claim 8 wherein said head spotting means comprises a plate, said plate having an elongated slot therein, said plate being secured to said torso and being rotatable with respect to said torso, cylinder means being keyed to said shaft and being eccentrically mounted thereon, said cylinder means being positioned in said slot, said plate being keyed to a head driving shaft, said head driving shaft being adapted to cause the rotation of said head, whereby the rotation of said torso around said cylinder will cause said cylinder to move eccentrically within said slot, thereby oscillating said plate about said head shaft, and thereby oscillating said head.

10. A doll comprising a torso, a pair of legs and a pair of arms on said torso and a head rotatably mounted on said torso, drive means for rotating said torso about a generally upright axis, and head spotting means for controlling the rotation of said head as a function of the rotation of said torso, said head spotting means initially causing said head to rotate, relative to said torso, in a direction opposite to the direction of rotation of said torso, thereby giving the appearance that said head faces in a substantially fixed direction during the initial part of each revolution of said torso, and said head spotting means thereafter causing said head to rotate in the same direction as said torso, but at a faster rotational rate of speed, in order to cause said head to rotate a complete revolution for each revolution of the torso, whereby said head will again face in said substantially fixed direction; said head spotting means com prising a plate, said plate having an elongated slot therein, said plate being mounted on said torso and being rotatable with respect to said torso, said drive means including a shaft rotatable relative to said torso, cylinder means keyed to said shaft and being eccentrically mounted thereon, said cylinder means being positioned in said slot, said plate being keyed to a head driving shaft, rotation of said head driving shaft and causing rotation of said head, whereby the rotation of said torso around said cylinder will cause said cylinder to move eccentrically within said slot, thereby oscillating said plate and said head shaft, and thereby oscillating said head.

11. The doll of claim 10 wherein said head is secured on a neck disc, said neck disc being rotatably mounted with respect to said torso, said neck disc being pivotally secured to a neck plate, and said neck plate being keyed to said head driving shaft, whereby the oscillation of said torso plate will oscillate said head driving shaft, thereby oscillating said neck plate and said head which is pivotally secured to said neck plate.

I II! =0

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Referenced by
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US4182076 *Feb 17, 1978Jan 8, 1980Mattel, Inc.Animated doll
US4824417 *Aug 3, 1987Apr 25, 1989Redemption Church Of ChristDynamic wrestling figures
US4952189 *Dec 26, 1989Aug 28, 1990Gordon Barlow DesignSpinable doll
US5147238 *Nov 9, 1990Sep 15, 1992Mattel, Inc.Tap dance doll
US5201443 *Apr 4, 1991Apr 13, 1993Oswald Walter AGarment hanger and toy combination
US5403223 *Jan 5, 1994Apr 4, 1995Gaulkin; Marianne Q.Simulated ballerina and dance studio apparatus
US5727982 *Apr 12, 1996Mar 17, 1998Hasbro, Inc.Action figure with rotating arm mechanism
US5836803 *Jun 24, 1997Nov 17, 1998Namkung Promotions Inc.Figurine with movable limb
US6042451 *Aug 14, 1998Mar 28, 2000Mattel, Inc.Doll simulating ice skating or dancing spin moves
US6132285 *Aug 2, 1999Oct 17, 2000Mattel, Inc.Doll simulating yoyo play
US6419546 *Sep 27, 1999Jul 16, 2002Medicom Toy CorporationDoll movable structure for loin and groin
US7207859Apr 28, 2005Apr 24, 2007Hasbro, Inc.Realistic animatronic toy
US7641535Jul 12, 2006Jan 5, 2010Hasbro, Inc.Artificial eye assemblies
WO2001008774A1May 11, 2000Feb 8, 2001Mattel IncDoll simulating yoyo play
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/266, 446/390, 446/330, 446/352, 446/333, 446/379, 446/365
International ClassificationA63H13/00, A63H3/48, A63H3/00, A63H3/18, A63H13/12
Cooperative ClassificationA63H3/48, A63H13/12, A63H3/18
European ClassificationA63H3/48, A63H13/12, A63H3/18