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Publication numberUS3703104 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 21, 1972
Filing dateDec 21, 1970
Priority dateDec 21, 1970
Publication numberUS 3703104 A, US 3703104A, US-A-3703104, US3703104 A, US3703104A
InventorsTamplen Jack W
Original AssigneeTamplen Jack W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Positioning apparatus employing driving and driven slots relative three body motion
US 3703104 A
Abstract
Positioning apparatus for effecting movement of a first body with respect to a second body in response to movement of a third body characterized by a slot traversal member engaging a set of driving slots and a set of driven slots that are formed respectively in the first and second bodies. One of the sets of driven and driving slots comprises a closed pattern of slots; and the other comprises a single slot having at least two portions that have the same design and are movable so as to be coextensive with the slots of the closed pattern of slots. Also disclosed are tubular and planar constructions employing the driving and driven slots.
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United States Patent Tamplen [54] POSITIONING APPARATUS EMPLOYING DRIVING AND DRIVEN SLOTS RELATIVE THREE BODY MOTION [72] Inventor: Jack W. Tamplen, Rural Route 2,

, Celina, Tex. 75009 [22] Filed: Dec. 21, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 99,763

521 US. Cl 5.74/88, 166/240 [51] Int. Cl .,...Fl6h 27/02 [58] Field of Search ....74/57, 88; 308/124, 201, 185; j 166/240 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,350,538 6/1944 Selnes ..308/185 3,003,830 10/1961 Blazek et al. ..308/201 3,036,641 5/ 1962 Nutter et al. ..166/240 3,209,832 10/1965 Tausch ..166/240 3,446,280 5/ 1969 Nutter ..166/240 2,556,010 6/1951 Swanson ..74/88 2,751,789 6/1956 Orenick ..74/57 577,091 2/1897 Wetzel ..74/57 1,985,901 1/1935 Liles ..74/57 1,233,858 7/1917 Farmer ..74/57 [451 Nov. 21, 1972 3,143,340 8/1964 Maslonka ..74/89.15 3,223,072 12/ l 965 Bross ..74/88 3,260,289 7/1966 Whitten, Jr ......74/57 3,590,645 7/ 1971 Magri ..74/88 2,121,831 6/1938 Simmons ..74/57 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 1,180,391 12/1958 France ..74/88 Primary Examiner-William F. ODea Assistant Examiner-Wesley S. Ratlifi', Jr. Att0rneyWofford & Felsman 57] ABSTRACT Positioning apparatus for effecting movement of a first body with respect to a second body in response to movement of a third body characterized by a slot traversal member engaging a set of driving slots and a set of driven slots that are formed respectively in the first and second bodies. One of the sets of driven and driving slots comprises a closed pattern of slots; and the other comprises a single slot having at least two portions that have the same design and are movable so as to be coextensive with the slots of the closed pattern of. slots. Also disclosed are tubular and planar constructions employing the driving and driven slots.

19 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures POSITIONING APPARATUS EMPLOYING DRIVING AND DRIVEN SLOTS RELATIVE THREE BODY MOTION BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention This invention relates to apparatus for controlling the movement of other apparatus. More particularly, it relates to apparatus for effecting movement of a first body to a plurality of stations with respect to a second body in response to relatively standard movements of a third body.

2. Description of the Prior Art It is known in the prior art to position one body with respect to a second body in response to movement of a third body. For example, in down-hole tools for use in wells penetrating subterranean formations, arming means have been triggered by moving the tool past a restricted bore to move one body into an armed position with respect to the second body by movement through the restricted bore. Such devices have been disadvantageous since they were ordinarily not reversible and hence with armed when the tool was moved through the first restricted bore, preventing moving through other restricted bores. Moreover, the prior art has known expensive and elaborate positioning apparatus for use at the surface in positioning tools such as mill heads and drills. The elaborate prior art apparatus has employed punched tape, magnetic tape, or the like which required elaborate read-out heads and preprogramed, computer-like electronic apparatus to position the tools via complicated x-y coordinate positioning motors. Such apparatus has been expensive, costing many thousands of dollars.

The prior art apparatus has not been completely successful in affording a relatively inexpensive, readily operable apparatus for effecting automatic positioning of a first body with respect to a second body in response to movement of a third body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a partial side elevational view, partly in section, of a downhole tool employed in servicing wells such as oil wells penetrating subterranean formations, and employing one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a partial diagrammatic illustration of the tubular sleeve of FIG. 1 in unfolded format.

FIG. 3 is a partial diagrammatic illustration of the body means of FIG. 1 in unfolded format.

FIGS. 4 and 5 are, similarly, partial diagrammatic illustrations of unfolded sleeve means and body means employing another embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic illustration of a bent slot disposed in a first body and useful in at least two embodiments of this invention.

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic illustration, in unfolded format, of a body having a cylindrical exterior and having a closed pattern of slots defining both right hand rotation and left hand rotation patterns in accordance with another embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 8 is a partial side elevation view, partly in section, of a planar apparatus, in accordance with another embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 9 is a partial diagrammatic illustration of a closed pattern of slots disposed in a planar body in accordance with the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 8.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS It is an object of this invention to obviate the disadvantages of the prior art structures and provide an economical apparatus for effecting movement of a first body with respect to a second body in response to movement of a third body.

Referring to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a portion of a running tool 11. Running tools, in general, are employed for a variety of purposes such as setting locking devices in tubing in a well penetrating subterranean formations. The particular running tool 11 is described and claimed in my copending application Method and Apparatus for Emplacing a Locking Device in Tubing Ser. No. 99,762, filed on the same date herewith. That application describes in detail the usefulness of the closed pattern of slots in the body means of the tool and the bent slot in a tubular sleeve disposed thereabout in orienting the tool between a run-in position in which locking dogs of a locking device were retracted and nogo position in which the locking dog means of the device were partially extended for encountering a restricted bore. Additionally, the positioning of a lower control ball means in the armed position such that the locking device attached to the running tool could be locked and left in place in the tubing was described. The descriptive matter of that application is embodied herein by reference for the purpose of illustrating completely the usefulness of this invention in running tool 11. Only a portion is summarized hereinafter to illustrate the operation of one embodiment of this invention.

Basically, the running tool 11 includes a first body in the form of a tubular sleeve 13 having a bent slot 31 serving as the driven slot. The running tool 11 also includes a body means 17 having a closed pattern of slots 19 on its exterior surface. The running tool 11 also includes a slot traversal member in the form of ball means 21 carried by a third body in the form of drag means 23. To effect rotation of the tubular member 13, relative longitudinal motion is obtained between body means 17 and drag means 23. Operation of the device is explained hereinafter in terms of movement of the drag means 23 with respect to the body means 17, even though when operating in the well the opposite occurs. For example, going into the well gravity causes body means 17 to outrun the drag means 23, which frictionally drags on the tubing. Consequently, the drag means 23 is moved to its top position, as illustrated in FIG. 1. Conversely, when the body means 17 is stopped and moved upwardly; for example, by a cable attached to its top; it outruns the frictionally dragging drag means 23, which is moved to its bottom position just above control ball means 25. Expressed otherwise, the drag means 23 drags against the wall of the tubing to be biased toward its extreme position in a direction opposite to the direction in which the running tool is being moved in the tubing. As illustrated, the drag means 23 is biased upwardly toward its uppermost position to move slip means 26 upwardly onto frusto-conical portion 28. By suitable slot length, the ball means 21 may be limited to other longitudinal positions to accomplish other purposes. The tubular sleeve 13 is rotationally driven by the slot traversal member, in turn driving a control ball means 25 around its control slot. The tubular sleeve 13 is disposed at a longitudinally fixed location with respect to the body means 17. As

can be seen in FIG. 2, the tubular sleeve means 13 has a bent slot 31 therein. The bent slot 31 has a longitudinal portion 33 and a helical portion 35. A longitudinal overrun portion 37 is provided at the lower end to ensure that the ball means 21 will have been moved to the end of the helical portion 35 to effect proper alignment, or orientation. The longitudinal portion 33 is movable by sleeve rotation so as to be coextensive with an upper portion of the longitudinal slots 27, FIG. 3, in the body mean 17. Similarly, the tubular sleeve may be rotated such that the helical portions 35 are moved so as to be coextensive with a lower portion of the helix slots 29 in the body means 17. The helical portion 35 has a length L, that is one-half the length L of the helix slots 29 of FIG. 3 to keep the ball means 21 moving in the proper direction to rotate the tubular sleeve 13 and prevent its entry into slots from which it has just emerged. The tubular sleeve 13 has a bottom slot 39 for moving the control ball means 25 peripherally about the tubular body means for further control; such as, moving the ball means 25 onto and from cam 41 and into and from annular slot 43, as described in the copending application Ser. No. 99,762.

The body means 17 has at least one lineal slot extending longitudinally of the body means; and, hence, referred to as longitudinal slots 27. The termlongitudinal is employed herein to mean a lineal slot that is generally aligned with the longitudinal axis of the pattern of slots. It is not to be construed in a limiting sense as indicating that the slot must align with the longitudinal axis of a given machine or larger development. It also has a plurality of laterally divergent and convergent slots, referred to in this embodiment as helix slots 29, connecting the bottom portion of a longitudinal slot with a top portion of a longitudinal slot. The number of longitudinal and helix slots 27 and 29 that are employed will depend upon the application. As illustrated, the running tool 11 has three longitudinal slots 27 and three helix slots 29 spaced equally about its periphery to define a slotted path of travel completely around the periphery of the body means 17.

Operation of the drag means 23, the ball means 21, control ball means 25, and the tubular sleeve 13 may be understood from the following descriptive matter and FIGS. 1, 2, and 3. These FIGS. show a layout of the tubular sleeve and the respective longitudinal and helix slots in the body means. Superimposed thereon are ball means 21 and the control ball means 25 in a plurality of positions to illustrate the points made hereinafter. The bent slot 31 of the tubular sleeve 13 overlies respective vertical slots 27 and helix slots 29 of body means 17. As the ball means 21 is moved upwardly and downwardly in response to reciprocal movement of the drag means 23, the tubular sleeve 13 is rotated. As illustrated, the tubular sleeve 13 is rotated counter-clockwise, as viewed from the bottom. One reciprocal cycle is used herein to define a complete movement of the drag means 23 through a downward half-cycle and an upward half-cycle, such that the ball means 21 will move from one slot end, such as upper slot end 49, to the next similar slot end, such as upper slot end 45. During onehalf reciprocal cycle, the bent slot 31 will move 60. The arrows 50 indicate the path and direction that the ball means 21 moves during a particular reciprocal cycle of the drag means 23. As illustrated, the ball means 21 begins to move downwardly from upper slot end 49. The tubular sleeve means 13 is not rotated until the ball means reaches the helical portion 35 of the bent slot 31 therein. The longitudinal portion 33 of the bent slot 31 prevents the ball means 21 from entering the helix slot 29 to the right at the upper portion. As the ball reaches the helical portion 35 in its downward travel, it begins to bias, or rotate, the tubular sleeve 13 by camming between the helical portion 35 and the linear edge 36 of the longitudinal slot 27 on the body means 17. The ball is moved downwardly to the lower slot end 55. Simultaneously, it moves into the longitudinal overrun portion 37 of the tubular sleeve 13.

As the movement of the drag means 23 is reversed, the ball means 21 will move upwardly away from the lower slot end and into the helical portion 35. Since the helical portion 35 overlies the helix slot 29, the ball 21 is moved into the helix slot 29 leading to the upper slot end 45, and the ball 21 is prevented from moving up the longitudinal slot leading to the upper end 49. Again, the tubular sleeve 13 does not move relative to body means 17 until the ball means 21 has been guided past the entry into the longitudinal slot of the body means and has moved to the longitudinal portion 33 of the tubular sleeve 13. As the ball means 21 reaches the longitudinal portion 33 in its upward travel, it begins to rotate the tubular sleeve 13 by camming between the longitudinal portion 33 and the edge 52 of the helix slot on the body means. Consequently, the tubular sleeve 13 is rotated in the counterclockwise direction. Continued upward movement of the drag means 23 emplaces the ball means 21 in the upper slot end 45 and adjacent the upper end of the vertical portion 33 of tubular sleeve 13. From the foregoing, it can be seen that continual cycling of the drag means will continue to rotate tubular sleeve 13 with respect to the body means 17.

As tubular sleeve 13 is rotated, the bottom slot 39 positions the lower control ball means 25 into either annular slot 43 for effecting a retracted position of locking dog means or onto cam 41 for effecting a no-go position of the locking dog means.

The left hand operation, or counterclockwise rotation, by the combination of longitudinal and helix slots are illustrated. Right hand operation can be employed if desired. In fact both right hand and left hand operation can be employed, as in FIG. 7 hereinafter.

Referring to FIG. 3, the upper slot ends 49 and 45 and the lower slot ends 51, 53 and 55 are employed as stops for the ball means 21; consequently, stopping the drag means 23. If desired, the slot ends may be extended, as was upper slot end 47 to effect other operations such as allowing the slips 26 to ride up the frustoconical means 28 to warn the operator. In the latter case, the upper end 57 of the vertical portion 33 of the bent slot 31 is employed to limit upward movement of the ball means 21, illustrated in dashed lines 59 of FIG. 3. The upper end 47 is extended upwardly to facilitate assembly of the running tool 1 1.

If desired, a plurality of sets of slots may be employed. For example, the longitudinal slots may be spaced only 60 apart and six such slots employed to allow two sets of three complete reciprocal cycles during one revolution of the tubular sleeve 13. Such an arrangement allows a greater mechanical torque ratio to be achieved between the tubular sleeve 13 and the body means 17 while applying the same force to the drag means 23. Ordinarily, however, in a properly designed tool, the relative movement between the parts is readily effected and such greater mechanical force is unnecessary. I

Other embodiments such as illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5 may be employed. Therein, a single straight slot serving as longitudinal slot 27 and a single helical slot 29 are employed to pass completely around a body having a cylindrical exterior. For example, longitudinal lot 27 may extend longitudinally on the body means 17 parallel with the longitudinal axis thereof. The helix slot 29 will then pass substantially completely around the exterior surface of the body means 17 and intersect the straight slot 27 convergingly at its upper end and divergingly at its lower end, with respect to the same reference line.

The bent slot in the tubular sleeve may take a plurality of shapes. The shape may effect uniform rotation of the tubular sleeve with each half reciprocal cycle. Other shapes may be employed to effect nonuniform rotation of the tubular sleeve with respective half reciprocal cycles. For example, if the bent slot 31 has a configuration as illustrated by the dash lines depicting slot 61, joining the helical portion and the longitudinal portion at the point 63, the resultant movement between the body means 17 and the sleeve 13 will be 180 per half reciprocal cycle. The equal degrees of rotation occurs only when the point 63 is centered lengthwise relative to the helix slot 29. When the point 63 is moved upwardly to a point illustrated by point 65 and a different bent slot configuration, illustrated by the dashed lines representing slot 67, and unequal rotation may be effected. For example, the tubular sleeve may be rotated 270 on the downward half reciprocal cycle and rotated only 90 on the upward half reciprocal cycle. On the other hand, if the point 63 is moved downwardly to a point represented by point 69 to effect a bent slot having a configuration such as slot 71, the sleeve may be rotated in unequal amounts during each half cycle, but in the opposite direction. For example, the sleeve may be rotated only 60 on the down half reciprocal cycle and rotated 300 on the up half reciprocal cycle. The combination of angles add up to 360 at the end of a complete reciprocal cycle.

Similarly, the closed pattern of slots may take a plurality of shapes. For example, the plurality of longitudinal slots may be unequally spaced, as illustrated by dashed longitudinal slot 151, FIG. 3, with respect to other longitudinal slots. The respective laterally divergent and convergent slots such as helix slots 155 and 157 may be formed in either of two ways to efiect the desired degree of movement of the tubular sleeve with each one-half reciprocal cycle. To illustrate, the helix slot 155 may have the same degree of divergence as the helical portion 35 and intersect the longitudinal slot 151 at a longitudinal location 159 that is different from the other longitudinal locations. On the other hand, the helix slot 157 may have a slightly different degree of divergence from the helical portion 35 and intersect the longitudinal slot 151 at the same longitudinal location 161. It is imperative, however, that the degree of divergence of the helix slots and the helical portion 35 be sufficiently close that the slot traversal member is guided into the next desired slot such as a helix slot 157 and not back into the slot from which it has emerged such as the longitudinal slot 151. Expressed otherwise, the bent slot must have a portion of coextensive overlap with the respective longitudinal and helix slots that is sufficient to guide a slot traversal member into a next slot and prevent its entering into a slot from which it has emerged.

FIGS. 6 and 7 illustrate a sleeve and body means wherein a left hand single revolution and then a right hand single revolution of the sleeve may be effected with the driving and driven slots, with a number of indexing positions during each respective revolution. The

lower pattern of longitudinal slots 27 and helix slots 29 are very similar to those illustrated in FIG. 3. An upper pattern of longitudinal slots 27 and helix slots 29. are formed in the body 73. As can be seen, the upper and lower slots are substantially the same and are connected with straight slot intermediate the two patterns. The lower bent slot 31 of the tubular sleeve 77 and the upper bent slot 79 diverge in opposite directions with respect to slot 81. If desired, the helix slots 29 in the upper pattern of slots could be reversed and the upper bent slot 79 reversed and effect the right hand rotation of the sleeve 77.

As can be seen, and similarly as described with respect to FIG. 3, a slot traversal member such as the ball means 21 of FIG. 1 is moved reciprocally in the respective slot developments. Starting with the slot traversal member in the lower pattern of slots, the tubular sleeve 77 will be rotated in first the counterclockwise direction and then the clockwise direction. Specifically, a ball means 21 moving downwardly from slot end 49 will be prevented from entering the helix slot 29 from whence it was moved, by the longitudinal portion 33 of the lower bent slot 31; but will not rotate tubular sleeve 77 until it encounters the helical portion 35 thereof. Upon encountering the helical portion 35, it will cam down the helical portion 35, as described hereinbefore with respect to FIG. 3; and effect counterclockwise rotation of the tubular sleeve 77. Similarly, when the ball is moved upwardly on an upward half reciprocal cycle, it will not efiect rotation of the sleeve 77 until it encounters the longitudinal portion 33, as it moves upwardly toward slot 75. Thereafter, it will cam upwardly along the longitudinal portion 33 and effect counterclockwise rotation of the sleeve 77. The slot traversal member will pass on upwardly, however, through slot 75 of the body means and slot 81 of the sleeve 77 until it encounters the inverse helical portion 83. Thereafter, it will cam up the inverse helical portion 83 and rotate sleeve 77 in the clockwise direction. Similarly, on the next downward half cycle, the ball means 21, illustrated in dashed lines 85 will move downwardly to the lower slot end 87, camming the sleeve 77 clockwise when it contacts the longitudinal portion 89. The next upward reciprocal half cycle will move the ball means 21 to the upper slot end 91 camming the sleeve means in a clockwise direction when the slot traversal member encounters the inverse helical portion 83. Similarly, the next downward half reciprocal cycle moves the slot traversal member to the lower slot end 92, camming the sleeve '77 in clockwise rotation when it encounters the longitudinal portion 89. The continued reciprocal half cycles continue to effeet clockwise rotation of sleeve 77 until the slot traversal member again is able to travel downwardly into the lower pattern of slots via slots 75 and 81. As the slot traversal member encounters and earns down helical portion 35, the tubular sleeve 77 is rotated counterclockwise. At the lower point, the slot traversal member will be in the lower end 51. The next upward half reciprocal cycle will move the slot traversal member to the upper end 47, rotating the sleeve 77 counterclockwise when it encounters the longitudinal portion 33. Similarly, continued reciprocal movement through respective reciprocal half cycles will effect counterclockwise rotation of the sleeve until the slot traversal member again reaches the slots 75 and 81 and is permitted to pass to the upper pattern of slots. Expressed otherwise, the lower slot pattern produces counter clockwise movement for 360 and the upper slot pattern produces clockwise movement for 360 with controlled degrees of indexing within each direction of rotation, depending upon the orientation and spacing of the respective longitudinal slots and helix slots.

The foregoing description has been given with respect to rotating the tubular sleeve. If the tubular sleeve 77 is fixed against rotation, the body 73 will be driven via the respective slot patterns to rotate in the opposite direction to that described hereinbefore with respect to the sleeve 77. The slot traversal member may be reciprocated by means of a tubular housing similar to the drag means 23. The tubular housing may be operated reciprocally by suitable force such as a hydraulic piston, cylinder, and shaft arrangement; or it may be reciprocated manually; or by simply dragging along a tubing wall, described with respect to FIG. 1.

A removable stop 93 is employed to limit movement of the slot traversal member and yet facilitate assembly, particularly where the slot traversal member comprises a ball means similar to ball means 21. Moreover, the respective upper and lower ends of the slots in the upper and lower slot patterns may be adjusted or varied by use of similar such adjustable stops to accomplish various functions or to position elements at different locations, or stations.

FIG. 8 illustrates another embodiment in which the pattern of slots and the bent slot is employed in planar bodies. Therein, a first planar body 95 having a bent slot disposed therein overlies a second body 97. A third body 99 carries a slot traversal member 101 that drivingly engages the bent slot 31 and engages the closed pattern of slots 103. At least one of the bodies; such as, third body 99 may encompass or be connected with a suitable means such as a power driven tool 105 that may be supplied power by suitable flexible means 107. For example, the tool 105 may be an automatic nailing machine which is supplied air through a pneumatic hose 107 for nailing together a positionable framework that is responsive to movement of the first member 95 and comprises first and second members 109 and Ill, the lower member 111 having been emplaced along suitable rail supports 113 at each end. On theother hand, the tool 105 may be a milling machine, or an automatic drill press. In any event, the third body 99 is moved reciprocally by means of shaft 115 in response to suitable motive power such as a cylinder and piston arrangement (not shown). The slot traversal member 101 and the third body means 99 are constrained to movement that will keep the slot traversal member engaging the slots of the slot pattern 103. As illustrated, the third body 99 is restricted to planar movement by a planar top 117 thereover. That is, the third body 99 moves longitudinally and laterally along the bottom surface 119 of the top 117. In response to the movement of the third body 99, the first body 95 is caused to move laterally. By judicious choosing of the lengths of the respective slots, the first body 95 may be moved longitudinally, also. The tool 105 is moved to a plurality of stations in response to a movement of third body 99. The respective movement may be seen by referring to FIGS. 6 and 9.

FIG. 6 also illustrates a section of the first body 95 having the respective bent slots 31 and 79 therein. The same bent slot arrangement may be employed in either planar or tubular form for effecting the desired motion, either rotational, lateral, or some longitudinal, in response to being driven by the respective slot traversal member.

FIG. 9 illustrates an automatic right and left hand slot pattern that can be machined into a planar surface. The respective bent slots 31 and 79 and slot 81, FIG. 6, are formed in a planar first body 95. FIG. 9 illustrates a closed pattern of slots in the second body 97 that will allow positioning the third body 99 to a plurality of six stations 121-126. Simultaneously, thefirst body 95 is moved at least laterally for indexing. If desired, the number of stations can be reduced to two stations 123 and 124 by connection of slot ends 122 and 125, as illustrated in dashed lines 129. On the other hand, the number of stations can be increased to any number as long as the return slots 131 and 133 are on the outer edge of the pattern of slots. As illustrated, there is an upper pattern with two longitudinal slots 27 and two laterally converging and diverging slots 29; and a lower pattern of two longitudinal slots 27 and two laterally converging and diverging slots 29. Thus it can be seen that the number of stations that can be effected is two less than twice the total number of longitudinal slots in the closed pattern of slots. For example, as illustrated there are four longitudinal slots, two each in both the upper and lower patterns and, consequently, six stations are effected. The closed pattern of slots, FIG. 9, is similar to the closed pattern of slots on the unfolded body, as illustrated in FIG. 7. When a cylindrical configuration is employed, however, the slots 131 and 133 may be superimposed such that they are the same slot as illustrated by slot in FIG. 7.

The operation of the planar embodiment is essentially the same as described hereinbefore. For example, as the slot traversal member 101 is moved upwardly from the lower slot end 123, it is guided into the laterally convergent and divergent slot 29 leading to the upper slot end, or station, 122. It does not begin to cam the first body 95, also illustrated as the unfolded tubular sleeve 77 in FIG. 6, laterally until it encounters the longitudinal portion 33. Thereafter, the first body is moved laterally to the left until the slot traversal member 101 reaches the station 122. As the slot traversal member 101 is moved reciprocally downward to slot and 121, it begins to move the first body 95 laterally when it encounters the laterally convergent and divergent portion 35, illustrated as the helical portion 35 in FIG. 6. As the slot traversal member 101 is moved upwardly, it passes through the return slot 133 to the uppermost slot end 126. There is no movement of the first body 95 until the slot traversal member 101 encounters the inverse laterally convergent and divergent portion 83, illustrated in FIG. 6 as the inverse helical portion 83 of the upper bent slot 79. This time, however, the camming movement moves the first body 95 laterally to the right, since the slot traversal member 101 will cam upwardly along the slot 83 while traversing longitudinally up the straight slot leading to the slot end 126. Similarly, downward movement of the slot traversal member 101 does not effect movement of the first body 95 until it encounters the longitudinal portion 89. Thereafter, the first body 95 is cammed to the right as the slot traversal member is moved to the lower slot end 125. Similarly, another reciprocal cycle of upward and downward movement of the slot traversal member will cam the first body 95 further to the right as described hereinbefore. At the completion of the next succeeding cycle, however, the slot traversal member is in the return slot 131 and returns to the lowermost slot end 123 to repeat the above described positioning cycle. The positioning cycle requires, as described, a plurality of reciprocal cycles.

The invention has been described hereinbefore with both planar and tubular embodiments. In the tubular embodiments it has been discussed with respect to employing a tubular sleeve and a tubular housing about a cylindrical body. Any two of the three may be tubular and disposed about one having an outer cylindrical surface. If desired, the one having the exterior cylindrical surface may also be tubular.

Moreover, as indicated hereinbefore, either the closed pattern of slots or the bent slot may be employed as the driving slot, the other being employed as the driven slot.

Accordingly, it can be seen that a wide flexibility of designs become possible for effecting the desired movement of a first body with respect to a second body in response to movement of a third body. The invention has been described hereinbefore with respect to a single tool or element being connected with one of the bodies. If desired, a plurality of tool or elements may be operably connected with respective bodies. For example, when used with a turret lathe, the closed pattern of slots will be in a fixed template, or second body, and serve as driving slots to control the approach of the tools toward the chuck; the first body, or indexing sleeve, will index the turret and serve as the driven slot; and the third body will be attached to the tool carriage and will have its slot traversal member positioning the carriage at the plurality of stations.

Although the invention has been described with a certain degree of particularity, it is understood that the present disclosure is made only by way of example and that numerous changes in the details of construction and the combination and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for effecting movement of a first body with respect to a second body in response to movement of a third body comprising:

a. a set of driving slots and a set of driven slots disposed respectively in said first and second bodies; one of said sets of slots comprising a closed pattern of slots including at least one longitudinal slot and at least one laterally divergent and convergent slot connecting the bottom portion of a longitudinal slot with a top portion of a longitudinal slot; and the other of said sets of slots comprising a bent slot having a longitudinal portion movable with its body so as to be coextensive with a portion of said longitudinal slot in said closed pattern of slots and having a laterally divergent portion connected with said longitudinal portion and movable with its said body so as to be coextensive with a portion of said laterally divergent and convergent slot in said closed pattern of slots; said portions of said longitudinal slot and said laterally divergent and convergent slot being at least sufficient in coextensive overlap to guide a slot traversal member into a next slot and prevent its entering a slot from which it has emerged; and

. a slot traversal member carried by said third body, drivingly engaging said set of driven slots and engaging said set of driving slots, said third body being movable with respect to said first and second bodies in at least two directions while maintaining said slot traversal member engaging said slots.

2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said set of driving slots are in said second body and said set of driven slots are in said first body.

3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said one of said sets is disposed in said second body and said other of said sets is disposed in said first body.

4. The apparatus of claim 3 wherein said one of said sets comprising said closed pattern of slots is employed as said set of driving slots and said other of said sets comprising said bent slot is employed as said set of driven slots.

5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein one of said bodies is cylindrical and two of said bodies are tubular; said at least one laterally divergent and convergent slot is a helical slot; and said third body is longitudinally movable with respect to said first and second bodies.

6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein said third body is rotationally movable with respect to said first and second bodies also.

7. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein there is only one longitudinal slot and said helical slot extends from its bottom peripherally around said second body to the top of said longitudinal slot.

8. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein a plurality of longitudinal and helical slots are disposed peripherally around said second body and each helical slot connects the bottom portion of one longitudinal slot with the top portion of an adjacent longitudinal slot.

9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein a right hand pattern of longitudinal and helical slots and a left hand pattern of longitudinal and helical slots are provided and a longitudinal slot is connected with both said patterns; and wherein said first body has a double bent slot arrangement with said laterally divergent portions matching respective said helical slots in said right and left hand patterns, whereby both right hand and left hand rotation of said first body can be effected.

10. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said bodies are planar; and one of said first and second bodies has a first set of one longitudinal slot and one laterally divergent and convergent slot, and a second set of one longitudinal slot and one laterally divergent and convergent slot, and each longitudinal slot is connected at its respective ends with respective said laterally divergent and convergent slots, and each laterally divergent and convergent slot is connected at its respective ends with respective said longitudinal slots; and the other of said first and second bodies has an interconnected double bent slot arrangement with said laterally divergent portions matching respective said laterally divergent and convergent slots in said sets, whereby said first body can be moved to at least two stations.

11. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said bodies are planar; and one of said first and second bodies has a first set of a plurality of longitudinal slots and a plurality of laterally divergent and convergent slots and a second set of a plurality of longitudinal slots and a pinrality of laterally divergent and convergent slots, and the outermost longitudinal slots of each set are connected with the outermost laterally divergent and convergent slots of each set to effect a closed pattern of slots; and the other of said first and second bodies has an interconnected double bent slot arrangement with said laterally divergent portions matching respective said laterally divergent and convergent slots in said sets, whereby said first body can be moved at least to a number of stations equal to twice the number of total vertical slots minus two.

12. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein adjustable stops are provided in said longitudinal slots for adjustably defining the ends of the slots and, consequently, the stations.

13. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein ends of said longitudinal slots are disposed at a plurality of different locations with respect to the longitudinal axis of said closed pattern of slots for defining a plurality of stations that are spaced longitudinally with respect to each other.

14. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said laterally divergent portion and said longitudinal portion of said bent slot have equal effective lengths and the same degree of movement of the body containing said bent slot is effected for each one-half reciprocal cycle.

15. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said laterally divergent portion and said longitudinal portion of said bent slot have unequal effective lengths and unequal degrees of movement of the body containing said bent slot is effected for each one-half reciprocal cycle.

16. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein a plurality of longitudinal and laterally divergent and convergent slots are equally spaced in said closed pattern of slots in one of said first and second bodies; and each laterally divergent and convergent slot connects the lower portion of one longitudinal slot with a higher portion of an adjacent longitudinal slot; for efi'ecting equal degrees of movement of the other of said first and second bodies for each respective one-half reciprocal cycle when said other body contains a bent slot that has laterally divergent and longitudinal portions of equal effective lengths.

17. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein a plurality of longitudinal and laterall divergent and converg ent slo s are unequally space in said c osed pattern of s ots in one of said first and second bodies; and each laterally divergent and convergent slot connects the lower portion of one longitudinal slot with a high portion of an adjacent longitudinal slot; for effecting unequal degrees of movement of the other of said first and second bodies for each respective one-half reciprocal cycle when said other body contains a bent slot that has laterally divergent and longitudinal portions of equal effected lengths.

18. The apparatus of claim 17 wherein said laterally divergent and convergent slots have the same degree of divergence as said laterally divergent portion of said bent slot and intersect said longitudinal slots at a plurality of longitudinal locations.

19. The apparatus of claim 17 wherein said laterally divergent and convergent slots have a different degree of divergence from said laterally divergent portion of said bent slot and intersect said longitudinal slots at the same longitudinal location.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification74/88, 166/331, 166/240
International ClassificationE21B23/00, F16H27/00, F16H27/02
Cooperative ClassificationF16H27/02, E21B23/006
European ClassificationF16H27/02, E21B23/00M2