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Publication numberUS3703762 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 28, 1972
Filing dateApr 12, 1971
Priority dateApr 12, 1971
Publication numberUS 3703762 A, US 3703762A, US-A-3703762, US3703762 A, US3703762A
InventorsWillard M Lind
Original AssigneeFmc Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of aligning forms
US 3703762 A
Abstract
Concrete form sections are made ready for easy subsequent alignment by cutting aligned holes in the opposed end bulkheads of the sections to be aligned and placing between the sections and within the holes alignment devices each of which consist of a set of two apertured plugs which are received upon and snugly engaged with a tapered pin. Each plug of a set is welded to one of the opposing bulkheads and the pin is then removed to permit the form sections to be separated. When the sections are subsequently aligned at the concrete pouring site, each pin is hammered back into snug engagement with its associated pair of plugs.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Lind I 52 us. Cl. ..29/464, 29/526, 287/189.36 F 51 Int. Cl. ..B23q 3/00 58 Field of Search ..29/464, 526, 467; 249/192;

' 287/l89.36 B, 189.36 D, 189.36 F

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,840,169 1/1932 Nash ..29/464' UX 2,347,41 1 4/1944 Hefler et a1. ..29/464 UX 2,782,483 2/1957 De Canio ..249/192 X 3,036,375 5/1962 Schlosser, Jr. et a1 ..29/467 NOV. 28, 1972 3,203,082 8/1965 Robbins ..287/ 189.36 F X 3,447,771 6/ 1969 Trimmer ..249/192 3,499,258 3/ 1970 Durand ..29/464 X Primary Examiner-Charlie T. Moon Attorney-F. W. Anderson, C. E. Tripp and R. S. Kelly ABSTRACT Concrete form sections are made ready for easy sub sequent alignment by cutting aligned holes in the opposed end bulkheads of the sections to be aligned and placing between the sections and within the holes alignment devices each of which consist of a set of two apertured plugs which are received upon and snugly engaged with a tapered pin. Each plug of a set is welded to one of the opposing bulkheads and the pin is then removed to permit the form sections to be separated. When the sections are subsequently aligned at the concrete pouring site, each pin is hammered back into snug engagement with its associated pair of 5 Claims, 4 Drawing Figures PATENTEDMflvze 1912 INVENTOR. WILLARD M. LIND ATTORNEYS METHOD OF ALIGNING FORMS CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION I The present application is a division of application Ser. No. 742,095 filed July 2, 1968, now US. Pat. No. 3,603,557.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION l Field of the Invention In general, this invention pertains to that field of art concerned with metallic forms for concrete structures, and more particularly, it pertains to a. method of precisely aligning adjacent metallic form sections in the field at the concrete pouring site.

2. Description of the Prior Art In the manufacture of forms for the precast and prestressed concrete industry, the forms are usually fabricated inlengths no greater than from ten to forty foot sections in order to eliminate the difficult handling problems and excessive material costs involved in making longer forms. Both at the job site and in the casting plant, therefore, the forms are frequently required to be used in multiples to create a single form, which may be several hundred feet in length, to cast products in multiples or singly in various intermediate lengths. Since the concrete product to be cast in the forms must be uniform in shape throughout its length, each individual form section in the multiple form must be accurately aligned with the adjacent form sections so that no unsightly casting seams or broken surfaces will be formed when the concrete is poured. The manufacturer of the forms must therefore take great care in their production so that the adjacent form sections will be able to be aligned precisely in the field. After the assembly and welding of the supporting frame and reinforcement for each of the form sections, the ends thereof will be carefully ground by the manufacturer to form a flat plane exactly transverse to the longitudinal axis of the form. The adjacent sections of the overall form can then be aligned on a conventional perfectly flat aligning table with the ground ends being brought into abutting engagement. Finally, the aligned ends are match-marked so that they will be readily identifiable for re-assembly in the field.

When the forms are assembled and aligned again at the concrete pouring site, the match-marked ends are brought together and bolts are run through predrilled holes in the reinforcement or bulkheads at the ends of the form sections in order to tightly secure the sections together. Problems, however, have been encountered in aligning the form sections in the field chiefly'because the surfaces on which the sections are placed are not always perfectly flat. Under such conditions a considerable amount of time is spent is shifting form sections relatively to each other in order to get them aligned. This frustrating shifting and pivoting of the form sections prior to the tightening of the connecting bolts results in costly and time consuming construction delays, and a need for a simple and effective means of aligning the form sections has existed in the concrete forming industry for a considerable period of time.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The presentinvention provides a method and a means whereby the adjacent end edge surfaces of metallic form sections can be precisely aligned in the field. Basically, the invention comprises an alignment device comprising a pair of apertured plug members secured together by a pin member which is received within the apertures in the plugs and which locks the plugs together in a pred'eterminedspatial relationship. One of the three named members has a frusto-conical exterior surface portion and at least one other of the members has a frusto-conical interior surface portion exactly matching the frusto-conical surface portion of said one member so that the predetermined spatial relationship of the plug members is determined by the relationship of said one member to said other member when their frusto-conical surface portions are in snug engagement. This alignment device is utilized during the initial alignment of the form sections at the manufacturers plant where the perfectly level aligning tables are available. When the adjacent form sections are aligned on these tables, the alignment device is placed within a pair of pre-cut holes in the opposing bulkheads at the ends of the sections. Each of the plug members is welded to one of the opposed bulkheads. The connecting pin member is then removed from its position within the plugs allowing the form sections to be separated, and the ends are then match-marked for identification. When the form sections are again assembled at the job site or in the casting plant, the pin member is reinserted through the plug members to lock the plug members in their predetermined spatial relationship and to bring the edges of the forms into the same precise alignment originally achieved at the manufacturers plant. The form sections can then be fastened together in this exact alignment with the conventional bolting means.

The method of the present invention has resulted in considerable savings of both time and money for the precast and prestressed concrete industry due to the elimination of much of the time consuming labor involved in the previous trial-and-error aligning of adjacent form sections. This is of particular importance and significance today because of the greatly increased production of precast and prestressed products whereby many different forms are used in the same casting bed with the individual form sections being assembled and disassembled many times during their useful life. In the expected increased use of precast concrete products in the future, the present invention will no doubt find even greater favor.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one end of a double T- beam concrete form section adapted to utilize the alignment method of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan of a pair of aligned and engaged double T-bearn concrete form sections of the design shown in FIG. 1, with a portion of the form sections being broken away in order to illustrate the alignment means of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged section through one of the alignment devices shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the alignment device shown in FIG. 3.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT In describing the form aligning method of the present invention, the alignment of two form sections ID of the conventional double T-beam design will be depicted although it will be obvious that the particular design of the form is immaterial in carrying out the principles of the invention. The double T-beam form section, as shown in FIG. 1, generally comprises a steel form member including a pair of tapered rib forming pockets 12 which are separated by a flat slab forming surface 14. Extending outwardly from the rib forming pockets are horizontal slab-forming surfaces 16 and upturned side edge forming flanges 18. The forms are supported upon a spaced series of transversely extending channel members 20, only the end one of which is shown in FIG. 1. Bulkhead members are provided upon the channel members in order to reinforce and rigidity the form structure, such bulkhead members including outer plates 22 supporting the slab-forming surfaces 16 and a pair of upstanding plates 24 and connecting cross bracket 26 for supporting the central slab forming section 14 of the form. It will be noted that the transversely extending edge 30 at the end of the form section is located slightly outwardly from the face of the adjacent bulkhead plates 22 and 24; consequently, only this edge needs to be aligned with the matching edge on the adjacent form section in order to provide a continuous molding surface across the adjacent form sections.

When the manufacture of a form section, such as shown in FIG. 1, is complete, the end edges 30 of the form will be ground upon a precision grinding machine so that they will be perfectly flat and everywhere at right angles to the longitudinal plane of the form section. A pair of adjacent form sections may then be brought together with the end edges 30 placed in abutting engagement, and any imperfections or misalignment in the forms will be corrected at that time. These operations are carried out upon specially constructed aligning tables which are perfectly flat so that the alignment obtained will be correct. When the form sections are to be realigned, the end edges 30 are again placed in abutting engagement and bolts are placed through specially provided bolt holes 36 in the channel members and in the bulkhead plates 22 and 24 and secured in place. The bolt holes are slightly oversized to allow the form sections to be shifted slightly relative to each other in order to attain the proper alignment of the end edges.

Since the footings or foundations in the field where the form sections are again reassembled are not always as level as was the alignment table in which the forms were originally aligned, a great deal of time is usually expended in aligning the forms before the bolts can be tightly secured within the bolt holes 36. The method of the present invention was designed to eliminate this unnecessary maneuvering of the adjacent form sections in the field and is adapted to be used by the manufacture of the forms to prepare them for easy subsequent realignment by the users.

Initially, holes 40 of approximately 2 inches in diameter are punched into the bulkhead plates 22 and 24 at conveniently spaced locations about the edges thereof supporting the form, such as is shown in FIG. 1 for example. When two form sections are placed in aligned and abutting relationship as described hereinbefore, the holes on the opposed bulkheads will be generally aligned within normal manufacturing tolerances. An alignment device 42, shown in an exploded view in FIG. 4, is then utilized to connect the two adjacent form sections by being placed through the aligned holes in the forms in the manner shown in the sectional view of FIG. 3. This alignment device includes a tapered dowel pin 44 and two plugs 46 and 48 having axially positioned apertures 46a and 4821 extending therethrough, respectively. Each of these apertures are tapered within the plug to the same degree as the taper on the dowel pin 44; that is to say, each of the apertures includes an interior frusto-conical surface portion which exactly matches an exterior frusto-coni cal surface portion of the pin so that the dowel pin may be passed through the plugs and received in snug engagement therein as shown in FIG. 3. It will be noted that the spacing between the plugs when they are received upon the dowel pin is approximately the same as the spacing between the opposed bulkhead plates at the ends of the adjacent abutting form sections. Consequently, when the assembled alignment device 42 is placed between the abutting form sections, the plugs will be generally centrally located within the holes 40 in the bulkheads. In this special position, each plug is welded at W about the periphery of the hole to its associated bulkhead plate to permanently fix it in position. Once the plugs are completely secured by welding, the connecting dowel pin can be removed and the forms can then be separated. As is conventional, the adjacent forms are then matched-marked for ready identification.

When the form sections are to be reassembled, the match-marked sections are brought into re-engagement with the end edge surfaces 30 in abutment. The dowel pins 44 are then reinserted through the roughly aligned apertures 46a and 48a in the plugs 46 and 48 by driving them through the plugs until they are received in snug engagement therewithin. The end edges 30 of the forms should now be in precise engagement as shown in the plan view of FIG. 2 and as was attained during the initial alignment of the forms at the manufacturing plant since the dowel pins 44 will be in precisely the same spacial location with respect to the forms as they were initially. The bolts are now secured through the slightly oversized holes 36 in the bulkheads to positively secure the sections together and the completed form will then be ready for the pouring of the concrete mix.

It can be seen that the alignment device of the present invention and the aforedescribed method provide a simple and yet highly effective means of aligning forms under field conditions, i.e., under conditions such as uneven or irregular supporting ground surfaces which might not be ideal for the abutment of a pair of thin end edges. The initial alignment operation is carried out under manufacturing shop standards wherein perfect alignment can be obtained quite easily while the subsequent alignment operation which in the past proved to be difficult now requires only the driving of a pin through two roughly aligned apertures. The aligning device, including the two plugs and connecting pin, is seen to be quite simple in construction and consequently can be manufactured without unduly increasing the cost of the forms to the user.

Although the best mode contemplated for carrying out the present invention has been herein shown and described, it will be apparent that modification and variation may be made without departing from what is regarded to be the subject matter of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is: I

l. A method of preparing an aligned pair of metallic form sections for easy subsequent realignment wherein said form sections are provided with transversely extending bulkheads spaced slightly from the abutted end edge surfaces of the form sections with at least one pair of aligned holes being located in theopposed bulk-' heads, said method comprising the steps of placing an alignment device between said holes with said device comprising first and second plug members and a connecting member securely attached to each of said plug members for maintaining each of said plug members in a predetermined spatial relationship with respect to the other plug member and whereby one of said members has a frusto-conical exterior surface portion and another of said members has a frusto-conical interior surface portion exactly matching the frusto-conical surface portion of said one member so that said predetermined spatial relationship of said plug members is determined by the relationship of said one member to said other member when their said frusto-conical surface portions are in snug engagement, rigidly securing each plug member within one of the holes in the opposed bulkheads while said alignment device remains in its assembled condition with said frusto-conical surface portions in snug engagement, and then removing said connecting member from the plug members to allow the form sections to be separated whereby subsequent realignment of the form sections may be achieved by re-connecting the connecting member to the plugs and bringing said frusto-conical surface portions back into snug engagement and said end edge surfaces of said form sections into abutment.

2. A method of preparing an aligned pair of metallic form sections for easy subsequent realignment as set forth in claim 1 wherein said holes in the bulkheads are tending bulkhead members spaced slightly from the abutted end edges of the form sections with at least one pair of aligned holes being located in the opposed bulkhead members, said method comprising the steps of placing an alignment device between said holes with said device comprising a tapered pin snugly engaged within a pair of spaced plugs, rigidly securing each plug within one of the holes in the opposed bulkheads while said pin remains in said snug engagement therewith, and then removing the pin from the plugs in order to allow the form sections to be separated whereby subsequent realignment of the form sections may be achieved by reinserting the pin back into its previous snug engagement with the two plugs.

4. A method of preparing an aligned pair of metallic form sections for easy subsequent realignment as set forth in claim 3 wherein said plqgs are provided with axially located tapered apertures or receiving said pm,

said apertures being tapered to the same degree as the taper on said pin.

5. A method of preparing an aligned pair of metallic form sections for easy subsequent realignment as set forth in claim 3 wherein said holes in the bulkheads are similar in shape to said plugs but of slightly greater diameter and wherein said plugs are welded within said holes.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1840169 *Jan 24, 1930Jan 5, 1932Circular Concrete Container CoCombination clamp and drift pin
US2347411 *Dec 12, 1942Apr 25, 1944Butler Manufacturing CoMethod of locating holes in structural members
US2782483 *Jul 11, 1955Feb 26, 1957Universal Form Clamp CompanyLiner clamp for panel forms
US3036375 *May 14, 1959May 29, 1962Gen ElectricMethod of mounting machines
US3203082 *Mar 26, 1962Aug 31, 1965Goodman Mfg CoAligned assembly method
US3447771 *Aug 14, 1967Jun 3, 1969Trimmer James EReinforcement for concrete wall form connectors
US3499258 *Nov 8, 1966Mar 10, 1970Richier SaAssembled steel structure sections
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US6314630 *Mar 21, 1997Nov 13, 2001The Boeing CompanyDeterminant wing assembly
US6558145Jul 6, 2001May 6, 2003Klaus A. WiederMold interlock
US6827569Mar 28, 2002Dec 7, 2004Klaus A. WiederMold vent and method
US6981858May 6, 2003Jan 3, 2006Wieder Klaus AMold interlock
US8376337Feb 19, 2013The Boeing CompanyElliptical locating apparatus
US8376338Feb 19, 2013The Boeing CompanyAngled locating apparatus
US8695219Mar 31, 2009Apr 15, 2014The Boeing CompanyDeterminant wing assembly
US9079312 *May 2, 2013Jul 14, 2015GM Global Technology Operations LLCPart transfer system that uses existing part features, and a method of using the part transfer system
US20020100860 *Mar 28, 2002Aug 1, 2002Wieder Klaus A.Mold vent and method
US20030203062 *May 6, 2003Oct 30, 2003Wieder Klaus A.Mold interlock
US20090228134 *Mar 31, 2009Sep 10, 2009The Boeing CompanyDeterminant Wing Assembly
US20100299903 *Dec 2, 2010The Boeing CompanyAngled Locating Apparatus
US20100301536 *Dec 2, 2010The Boeing CompanyElliptical Locating Apparatus
US20140327260 *May 2, 2013Nov 6, 2014GM Global Technology Operations LLCPart transfer system that uses existing part features, and a method of using the part transfer system
DE2905405A1 *Feb 9, 1979Aug 21, 1980Siemens AgContacting parts locator with pointed pins - bearing only against one mating part of assembly
WO1997034734A1 *Mar 21, 1997Sep 25, 1997The Boeing CompanyDeterminant wing assembly
WO2010138250A1 *Apr 15, 2010Dec 2, 2010The Boeing CompanyAngled locating apparatus
WO2010138251A1 *Apr 15, 2010Dec 2, 2010The Boeing CompanyElliptical locating apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/464, 228/139, 29/525.14, 29/525.8
International ClassificationB28B7/00, E04G17/14
Cooperative ClassificationE04G17/14, B28B7/0014
European ClassificationB28B7/00A7, E04G17/14