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Publication numberUS3705469 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 12, 1972
Filing dateDec 10, 1970
Priority dateDec 10, 1970
Publication numberUS 3705469 A, US 3705469A, US-A-3705469, US3705469 A, US3705469A
InventorsEriksson George J
Original AssigneeSuperior Concrete Accessories
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anchor insert and setting cone for a precast concrete body
US 3705469 A
Abstract
An anchor insert and a cooperating setting cone, the insert being designed for embedment in a concrete slab or other body, and the cone constituting a hole-forming pattern member which, when extracted from the hardened concrete, exposes a limited portion of the insert and renders it accessible for slab-lifting purposes. Novel cone-extracting means in the form of a torque rod facilitates breaking of the bond between the cone and the concrete and lifting the cone from the hole which it establishes in the concrete.
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United States Patent Eriksson [54] ANCHOR INSERT AND SETTING CONE FOR A PRECAST CONCRETE BODY [72] Inventor: George J. Eriksson, Morton Grove,

Ill.

[73] Assignee: Superior Concrete Accessories, Inc., Franklin Park, 111.

[22] Filed: Dec. 10, 1970 [21] App1.No.: 96,702

[52] US. Cl. ..52/125, 52/173, 52/577, 52/701, 52/704, 249/66 [51] Int. C1 ..F04b 1/41, B28b 7/16, B290 7/00 [58] Field of Search ..52/125, 173, 684, 685, 701, 52/698, 699, 704, 706, 711, 576, 577; 294/86, 89; 249/142, 177,.63, 66, 68, 183,

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,596,971 8/1971 Courtois et a1. ..294/89 3,195,851 7/1965' Hofman ..249/63 7 3,431,012 3/1969 Courtois et a1. ..52/125 3,172,163 3/1965 Chetirko ..249/63 774,007 1 1/ 1904 Tinstman ..249/63 567,705 9/1876 Fawkes ..-..249/66 [451 Dec. 12, 1972 2,234,784 3/1941 Stolz ..249/183 3,420,014 1/ 1969 Courtois et a1. ..294/89 2,957,279 10/1960 McNair ..52/701 3,216,171 11/1965 Jenkins; ..52/127 3,404,503 10/ 1968 Courtois et a1. ..294/89 3,195,278 7/1965 Ballou ..52/125 3,590,538 7/1971 Holt ..52/125 2,794,336 6/1957 Ba11ou ..52/125 FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 461,150 2/1937 Great Britain ..249/177 Primary Examiner-Frank L. Abbott Assistant Examiner-Leslie A. Braun Att0rneyN0rman H. Gerlach [5 7] ABSTRACT An anchor insert and a cooperating setting cone, the insert being designed for embedment in a concrete slab or other body, and the cone constituting a holeforrning pattern member which, when extracted from the hardened concrete, exposes a limited portion of the insert and renders it accessible for slab-lifting purposes. Novel cone-extracting means in the form of a torque rod facilitates breaking of the bond between the cone and the concrete and lifting the cone from the hole which it establishes in the concrete.

1 1 Claims, 11 Drawing Figures PATENTED m 1 2 I972 v IN VENTOR. GEORGE d ER/KSSO/V Arty.

w x TIQQWA O I m h. s

SHEET 1 OF 4 FIG.

o M 3 a 4 vw PAIENTEBBEW I912 3.705.469

' sum 2 or 4 GEORGE J ER/KSSO/V Arty.

IN VE N TOR.

PATENTEDDEE 12 1972 3; 705,469

SHEET 3 OF 4 //v ve/v TOR. GEORGE J ER/KSSON Atty.

PATENTEDHEB 12 m2 3,705,469

1 N VEN TOR.

GEORGE J. ER/KSSON BY r ANCHOR INSERT AND SETTING CONE FOR A PRECAS'I CONCRETE BODY No. 3,43l,0l2, granted on Mar. 4, 1969 and entitled "ANCHOR INSERT AND PICK-UP UNIT FOR A CONCRETE SLAB, and is also shown and described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,404,503, granted on Oct. 8, 1968 and entitled ANCHOR INSERT AND RELEASABLE PICK-UP UNIT THEREFOR," together with a novel coacting setting cone, one for each type of insert, each cone constituting a medium whereby the associated insert may initially be hold in a predetermined position within the confines of a concrete slab, wall, or other concrete body during pouring of the wet concrete, and serving when properly used to form a pattern member whereby a hole or socket is provided in the slab to the end that there is exposed a limited portion of the anchor insert and, hence, such portion may'be engaged by a pick-up unit like that of either of the aforementioned "patents or by any other appropriate lifting device whereby the slab, wall, or other concrete body may be lifted, hoisted, tilted or otherwise caused "to shift its position; Additionally, eachsetting cone of the present invention is provided with means whereby it may be readily extracted from the socket which it forms in the hardened concrete and thus freed from its associated anchor insert. In certain instances, such cone extraction means serves the additional function of affording an anchorage whereby the associated anchor insert may be attached to the concrete form for holding the setting cone and its insert fixedly in position within the confines of the concrete form during concrete pouring operations.

Among the various precast concrete bodies with which each anchor insert and associated setting cone are useable are slabs, beams, pilings, blocks and the like and, when so used, the anchor insert remains embedded and available within the concrete body for tiltup or liftup purposes in the manner fully described in aforementioned U.S. Pats. Nos. 3,431,012 and 3,404,503. The anchor inserts and setting cones of the present invention are also capable of use for cantilever anchorage purposes in connection with .concrete dams or like structures. When used in connection with a relatively massive slab or the like, application of either insert and associated setting cone to the concrete form for such structure may be made in various ways to accommodate either face or edge lifting, the setting cone remaining substantially the same in either instance, but the character of the anchor insert being modified as conditions requirerlrrespective, however, of the particular use to which the present anchor inserts and setting cones may be put, the essential features thereof remain substantially the same.

Briefly, each patented anchor insert embodies a reaction member which is formed of rod stock. In order to establish a passage in the concrete slab leading to and thereby exposing a portion of the insert for reaction purposes during tilt-up or lift-up operations, a hollow shell is fitted about the insert proper, remains embedded with the insert and excludes the flow of concrete to such portion so that the pick-up unit may be projected into the hole or socket and caused to engage the exposed portion of the insert for lifting purposes.

The present invention, in one form thereof, dispenses with the necessity for fitting such a shell about the anchor insert and instead-it contemplates the provision of a substantially solid frusto-conical body (heretofore and hereinafter referred to simply as a cone or a setting cone) which embraces the portion of the anchor insert that is to remain exposed in the concrete slab, and constitutes a hole pattern member which functions somewhat in the manner of a sprue-forming pattern in foundry work and affords a passage leading to such exposed portion of the associated anchor insert. The concrete is poured so that it embeds a major portion of the insert and the setting cone, but does not embed the portion of the insert which is subsequently to be used as a reaction anchor or member for lift purposes. Thereafter, when the concrete has become set, an externally threaded torque stem which is threadedly received in an axial bore that extends longitudinally or axially through the cone is manipulated so as to engage the anchor insert endwise and thus force the cone away from the insert and extract the same from the hole or socket which it creates in the hardened concrete. lnterengaging detent means on the setting cone and the anchor insert serve initially and'releasably to maintain the setting coneand the anchor insert in their preliminary concrete pouring positions within the concrete form, such detent means being automatically overcome at the time of cone extraction under the influence of the aforementioned torque stem.

In another form of the invention, the torque stem, instead of engaging a portion of the associated anchor insert for reaction purposes, remains free of the insert at all times and a reaction plate is caused to rest on the upper surface of the hardened concrete slab or other structure, such plate cooperating with the torque stem and cone to draw the cone from the concrete slab upon rotation of the torque stem.

The provision of anchor inserts and setting cones such as have briefly been outlined above, and possessing the stated advantages, constitutes the principal object of the present invention. Numerous other objects and advantages of the invention, not at this time numerated, will become readilyapparent as the nature of the invention is better understood from a consideration of the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying four sheets of drawings forming a part of this specification.

The invention consists in the several novel features which are hereinafter set forth and are more particularly defined by the claims at the conclusion hereof.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the anchor insert and setting cone embodying one form of the present invention and showing the same in their assembled relationship as a preliminary to be placed on the foundation FIG. 6 is a sectional view taken vertically through a portion of a concrete form in the vicinity of one of the anchor inserts of the present invention and illustrating schematically the manner in which the setting cone is separated from the insert and extracted from the formed concrete slab;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary plan view showing the setting cone of the present invention operatively assembled on a modified form of anchor insert, the cone and insert being effectively installed in a concrete slab form and the insert being designed for edge-lifting purposes after the form and cone have been stripped from the hardened slab;

FIG. 8 is a side view of the structure of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is an end elevational view of the structure of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 1 but showing a modified form of anchor insert and setting cone; and

FIG. 1 l is a sectional view similar to FIG. 6 but showing the manner in which the setting cone of FIG. 10 is extracted form the formed concrete slab.

Referring now to the drawings in detail and in particular to FIGS. 1 to 6, inclusive, and especially to FIG. 1, the invention in one form thereof, consists of an anchor insert assembly 10 and a setting cone 12 which, for convenience of description herein, will hereinafter be referred to simply as an insert and a cone, respectively. The insert is adapted to be positioned on the foundation surface 14 (see FIGS. 2 and 6) of a concrete form as, for example, a slab form, while the setting cone 12 is adapted to be removably applied to the anchor insert and the assembly of insert and cone then set into the form in such a manner that when wet concrete is poured into the form so as partially to envelop both the insert and cone, the setting cone functions as a hole pattern member so that after it is withdrawn from the hardened concrete it leaves a hole or socket 16 (see FIG. 6) in the hardened concrete slab S, such hole or socket extending vertically downwardly from the upper surfaced 18 of the slab to an exposed portion of the anchor insert 10, as well as therebeneath, in order that such exposed portion shall be accessible for engagement by a suitable lifting device such as a lifting hook or a pick-up unit of the type that is disclosed in aforementioned U.S. Pat. No. 3,431,012.

The anchor insert 10 is in the form of a reaction embedment rod assembly which consists of two identical spaced apart parallel foot sections 20 and a single central lift rod 22, the latter extending generally at right angles to the foot sections and being so termed because it presents a downwardly facing lift shoulder beneath which a lift hook or the like is adapted to extend during slab-lifting operation, the lift rod 22 thus assimilating all, or a portion of, the weight of the concrete mass (slab S) which is undergoing lifting. Each foot section 20 is in the form of an arched embedment rod having a generally horizontal medial part 24 and downtumed end parts 26. The lower ends of said end parts are turned upwardly as indicated at 28 and receive thereover elastomeric sleeves 30 which seat on the foundation surface 14 and are provided for the purpose of minimizing surface defects on the underneath side of the finished slab resulting from pouring of wet concrete on the foundation surface.

The lift rod 22 of the anchor insert 10 has its opposite end regions welded as indicated at 32 to the horizontal medial parts of the two-foot sections 20 so that the entire anchor insert 10, when viewed in plan from above, presents a generally H-shaped structure. The extreme end portions 34 of the lift rod 22, that is, those portions which are outside of the foot sections 20, are turned upwardly, while the medial region 36 of the lift rod is arched upwardly and a limited central section 38 thereof is flattened in a vertical direction so as to result in a decreased horizontal thickness and present vertically disposed planar side surfaces, the function of which will be described presently.

The setting cone l2 involves in its general organization a frusto-conical body 40 which is of small slant angle and is preferably formed of steel. Through the central portion of the body there extends an internally threaded central axial bore 42 which is designed for threaded reception therein of an externally threaded torque stem 44. A crank arm 46 is welded at 45 to the upper end of the torque stem and it has an upturned end portion 48 which establishes or forms a manipulating handle. The taper of the frusto-conical body 40 is merely sufficient to facilitate extraction of the body from the hardened concrete within which it becomes embedded when the setting cone 12 is put to use. The small or lower end of the cone body 40 is provided with a diametrically extending slot 50 of appreciable depth, the transverse width of the slot being slightly greater in extent than the thickness of the flattened central section 38 of the medial region 36 of the lift rod 22.

The slot 50 is adapted for reception therein of the flattened central section 38 of the lift rod 22 of the anchor insert 10 and, when full reception is attained, the curved or concave downwardly facing bottom of the slot 50 seats upon the curved upwardly facing edge of the flattened central section 38 as clearly shown in FIG. 3. In order releasably to maintain the setting cone 12 and the anchor insert 10 in their assembled relation with the lift rod 22 fully received within the slot 50, and with the cone substantially centered longitudinally on the lift rod, a pair of spring-pressed balls 52 make camming engagement with the curved downwardly facing edge of the flattened section 38 at spaced regions therealong, the balls constituting elements of a pair of detent assemblies which are disposed within internally threaded bores 54. The latter extend completely through the tines or furcations 53 which are established by the slot 50 and have disposed therein helical biasing springs 56 and Allen head reaction set screws 58 therefor. Said set screws are threadedly received in the bores 54. The balls are captured within the bores 54 by inturned rim flanges which allow limited portions of the balls to project into the slot 50 for detent purposes as shown in FIG. 5. A resilient elastomeric foam rubber or plastic filler piece 64 is adapted to be inserted into the slot 50 beneath the lift rod 22 in order to exclude the entrance of concrete into the slot at the time the wet concrete is poured into the concrete forms.

In the operation of the herein described'anchor insert and setting cone, the two parts, i.e., the insert and cone, are initially assembled upon each other. This assembly may be made by backing off the torque stem 44 until the lower end thereof is disposed above the level of the slot 50, after which the furcations of the slot are caused to straddle the central flattened section 38 of the lift rod 22 of the anchor insert 10. The cone 12 is then pushed downwardly against the anchor insert until the detent balls 52 are displaced by the flat sides of the flattened central section 38 of the lift rod 22 and ultimately move into position beneath said central section 38. A this time the section 38 bottoms" in the slot 50 while the detent balls make camming engagement with the curved underneath side of the flattened central section 38 and holdthe section 38 tightly against the bottom of the slot 50. The width of the flattened central section 38 is approximately equal to the width of the slot 50, very small tolerances prevailing, so that the anchor insert is securely held by the setting cone 12 in the position illustrated in FIG. 1, it being understood that this assembly of the insert and cone is manually effecte d before the assembly is applied to the concrete form.

After such insert and cone assembly has been made, the plastic filler piece 64 is forced into the lower portion of the slot50 beneath the lift rod 22 and then the with other types of anchor inserts and in such a manner anchor insert 10, with the setting ,cone 12 secured thereon, is set upon the foundation surface 14 as shown in FIG. 2. Thereafter, wet concrete is poured into the form to approximately the pouring level which is indicated by the horizontal pouring line PL in FIG. 2 of the drawings. Upon hardening of the poured concrete, the setting cone 12 is withdrawnfrom the embedded anchor insert 10 and from the hole or socket 16 (see FIG. 6) which it creates by its presence in the concrete. To effect such withdrawal, it is merely necessary to rotate the threaded torque stem 44 by means of the crank arm 46 in such direction as to cause the stem to move downwardly in the bore 42 and the lower end of the stem to engage the flattened central section 38 of the lift rod 22. After the lower end of the torque stem 44 engages said central section of the lift rod 22, continued turning movement'of the formed causes the frusto-conical body to break loose from the surrounding concrete and move upwardly as shown in FIG. 6, the detent balls 52 riding outwardly on the curved underneath surface of the flattened central section 34 of the lift rod 22 and, thereafter, passing upwardly across the flat sides of such section. As soon as these detent balls move out of contact with the lift rod 22, the entire setting cone 12 is completely released and may be readily lifted from the formed hole or socket in the concrete slab. During such upward movement of the setting cone 12 with respect to the lift rod 22' of the anchor insert 10, the plastic filler piece 64 remains beneath thelift rod and the latter causes the same to slide against the opposed sides of the slot 50 until it is entirely released by the setting cone 12. The anchor insert 10 and the tiller piece 64 are, therefore,

expendable items which remain embedded in the concrete, while the setting cone 12 is reuseable in a subsequent concrete slab or other installation.

Whereas, in connection with FIGS. 1 to 6, inclusive, the setting'cone 12 of the present invention has been illustrated an described in association with an anchor insert such as the insert 10 which leaves the medial or central portion of its lift rod 22 exposed for vertical lifting of the slab, beam, piling or other precast concrete body which is to be raised from the foundation surface of the concrete form, the setting cone is also useable that, instead of establishing a vertically extending hole or socket in the hardened concrete, it establishes a horizontally extending hole. Such an anchor insert is shown in FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 and is designated in its entirety by the reference numeral 110. The insert is thus capable of use for edge lifting of a slab or other precast concrete body.

The anchor insert 110 is similar in many respects to the previously described anchor insert 10 and it useable in a similar manner in connection with a setting cone 12. Therefore, in order to avoid needless repetition of description, similar reference numerals but of a higher order have been applied to the corresponding parts as between the disclosure of the anchor insert 110 in FIGS; 7 to 9, inclusive, and the disclosure of the anchor insert 10 of FIGS. 1. to 6, inclusive. Since the same identical setting cone 12 is useable with either the anchor insert 10 or the anchor inset 110, identical' reference numerals are applied to the disclosure of the setting cone in both groups of figures of the drawings.

In FIGS. 7, 8 and 9, the anchor insert 110 is shown as being operatively supported in its required elevated position within the confines of a shallow slab form, only one side of the form being illustrated and assuming the formof a wooden beam 113. Said anchor insert 110 is supported solely from the beam above the foundation surface 114 and, in order to obtain such support, the frusto-conical body 40 of the setting cone 12 is utilized as a hanger for the anchor insert. The body 40 is fixedly secured to the beam 113 by means of a fastening bolt 151 which projects through an opening or hole 153 which is formed in the beam the bolt being threadedly received in the bore 42 of the body 40 and serving to draw the large end face of the frusto-conical body hard against the inner side of the beam 113. The body 40 of the anchor insert 10 is thus fixedly secured on the beam 13 in a horizontal position so that the slot 50 therein is capable of receiving a limited portion of the anchor insert 110 in a manner and for a purpose that will be set forth in detail presently.

The anchor insert 110 is in the form of a closed loop of rod stock, the loop presenting an arcuate region 136 which corresponds to the lift rod 26 of the arcuate region 36 of the anchor insert 10. The central section 138 of said arcuate region is flattened for reception in the slot 50 of the body 40 of the setting cone 12.- The remainder of the loop consists of a pair of divergent arm sections 126 which are turned inwardly to provide overlapping sections 128 which are welded together as indicated at 129 in the drawings.

In the installed position of the anchor insert 1 10, the loop which constitutes the insert lies in a horizontal plane. For convenience of installation, the frusto-conical body 40 may initially be applied to the beam 113 by the bolt 151 and, after it is secured in position, the anchor insert 1 10 may be applied thereto by forcing the flattened central section 138 of the arcuate region 136 into the slot 50 until the anchor insert 1 10 is held by the detent balls 52 in a fixed position within the slot. Alternatively, the assembly of the anchor insert 110 may be manually effected prior to application of the former to the beam 113. In either event, the resultant structure is J that which is illustrated in FIG. 7 of the drawings.

After the concrete has been poured and the setting cone body 40 and the anchor insert 110 have become embedded and the concrete has set, the bolt 151 is first removed and then the beam 113 is stripped from the concrete slab or other concrete structure. Thereafter, the torque stem 44 is threaded into the bore 42 to such an extent that its forward end engages the flattened central section 138 of the anchor insert 110 and pushes the frusto-conical body 40 outwardly from the hole or socket which it creates in the concrete structure. The flattened central section 138 of the anchor insert thus remains exposed within the hole for so-called edge lifting of the slab.

ln FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 of the drawings, the poured and hardened concrete which results in the slab, beam, block or other precast concrete structure which is to be formed has not been illustrated, but it will be readily understood that the pattern forming function of the setting cone 12 remains the same regardless of whether the setting cone body 40 extends vertically for direct vertical lifting of the slab or whether it extends horizontally for edge lifting of the slab. Because of the fact that the flattened central section, 38 or 138 as the case may be, of either anchor insert or 110 fits within the slot 50 of the setting cone body 40 with a relatively snug fit and is spring-pressed therein under the influence of the detent balls 50, the setting cone is prevented from tilting when concrete is poured on the foundation surface 14 of FIG. 2 and, by the same token, the anchor insert 110 is prevented from sagging when concrete is poured on the foundation surface 114 of FIG. 8.

[n FIGS. 10 and 11, a different form of anchor insert assembly 210 and a modified setting cone 212' are shown. Specifically, the anchor insert assembly 210 is of the general type which is shown and described in aforementioned US. Pat. No. 3,404,503 in that two lift rods 222 span the distance between the spaced apart foot portions 220 instead of the single lift rod 22 which is associated with the insert assembly 10. To accommodate these two lift rods 222, the setting cone 212 is provided with two slots 250 in place of the single slot 50. Additionally, the detent means 52, 54, 56, 58 which is associated with the previously described setting cone 12 has been omitted. Otherwise, the setting cone body 240 remains substantially the same and, in order to avoid needless repetition of description, similar reference numerals of a still higher order have been applied to the corresponding parts as between the disclosures of FIGS. 10 and 11 on the one hand and FIGS. 1 and 6 on the other hand.

It is to be noted that the two slots 250 are disposed on opposite sides of a vertical axial mid-plane of the frusto-conical body 240 and are spaced apart a distance sufficient that the threaded central axial bore 242 passes between these slots and does not intersect them. The bore 242 thus extends through the cone from the upper end face to a point a small distance above the lower end face thereof. As a consequence, there is no portion of the anchor insert which is in alignment with the torque stem 244 for reaction purposes but, instead, cone extraction is accomplished by the provision of a separate reaction plate 251 which is adapted to be placed on the upper surface of the hardened concrete slab S2 as shown in FIG. 11 in the vicinity of the embedded cone body 240 in order to assimilate the downward thrust of the torque stem 244 incident to extraction of the cone body as the former is threaded into the latter.

The reaction plate 251 is generally of rectangular design and has formed therein a relatively large central opening 255, the diameter of such opening being slightly greater than the diameter of the large upper end of the cone body 240. When the reaction plate 251 is positioned on the upper surface of the slab S2, it is placed so that the opening 255 is in concentric relation with the embedded cone body in order that during cone extraction the cone body may pass upwardly through such opening. The reaction plate 251 constitutes one element of a four-piece assembly of parts, the torque stem 244 constituting another element of the assembly, the crank arm 246 constituting a third element, and an inverted U-shape compression bracket 257 constituting the fourth element.

The compression bracket 257 includes a pair of parallel vertical side legs 259 and a flat horizontal connecting bight portion 261, the latter being provided with a central hole 263 therethrough. The lower edges of the side legs 259 are welded as indicated at 265 to the plate 251. The axes of the hole 263 and the opening 255 are coincident. The torque stem 244 is in the form of a conventional coil bolt having a hexagonal head 267 which establishes a thrust bearing between the torque stem and the bracket 257 and is welded as at 269 to the central portion of the crank arm 246. The shank portion of the bolt is provided with a smooth portion 271 which is positioned adjacent to its upper end and is rotatable within the central hole 263. In order to capture the torque stem 244 and its associated crank arm 246 so that it may not be removed from the reaction plate 251 and the compression bracket, a nut 273is fully threaded onto the torque stem and is welded in place as indicated at 275 a slight distance below the bolt head 267. v

In the operation of the anchor insert assembly 210 and the setting cone 212 of FIGS. 10 and 11, the frustoconical cone body 240 is installed upon the anchor insert by causing the two slots 250 therein to straddle the central portions 236 on the two lift rods 222 until the slots bottom upon such rods. Thereafter, plastic filler pieces 264 are forced into the lower portions of the two slots 250 beneath the lift rods 222. With the parts thus assembled, the insert 210 and the cone 212 are set upon the foundation surface and the concrete is poured into the form to approximately the proper pouring line and allowed to harden.

In order to extract the setting cone 212 from the hardened concrete, the four-piece assembly including the torque stem, the reaction plate, the compression bracket, and the crank arm is applied to the cone by initially threading the lower end of the torque stem 244 into the bore 242 of the cone until such time as the reaction plate 251 becomes seated upon the upper face of the slab S2, at which time the axis of the large central opening 255 will automatically become aligned with the axis of the cone. Continued rotation of the crank arm 246 in a stem-tightening direction will place the torque stem under tension and the head 267 of the latter will bear downwardly against the upper face of the horizontal bight portion 261 of the compression bracket 257, thus placing the side legs 259 of the bracket under compression so as to force the reaction stemcontinues to rotate, the cone'body 240 will be drawn gradually upwardly through the opening 255 as shown in FIG. 11. As-soon as the concrete bond has been broken, the crank arm 246 may be used as a handle to lift the entire cone extraction assembly bodily upwardly, thus carrying the cone upwardly with it and out .of the patterned hole which is formed in the concrete slab. Such removal of the cone from the slab leave portions of the central portions of the two lift rods 222 exposed for subsequent slab tilt-up operations by means of a suitable pick-up unit such as is disclosed in aforementionedUS. Pat. No. 3,404,503.

It will be observed that during upward movement of the cone body 240, the two lift rods 222 prevent upward movement of the three plastic filler pieces 264, which remain :within-the slab-and in position beneath such lift rods. lt will also be observed that, due to the appreciable length of the smooth portion. 27l of the torque stem 244, there isa lostmotion between-the torque stemand the compression bracket 257. This enables the reaction plate 251 to move into its seating position on the concrete slab S2 as soon'as the torque stem 244 has been rotated only a few turns within the bore 242 of the cone. body 240QAfter such seating of the cone body, the next few' turns of the torque stem will cause the nut 273 to move downwardly from its contact with the underneath side of the bight portion 261 of the compression bracket 257 while the head 276 of the torque stem also moves downwardly from an elevated position above such bight portion and into. contact therewith preparatory to actual upward movement of the cone body for cone and slab separation.

Finally, it is to be noted that the four-piece assembly including the torque stem, the. reaction plate, the compression bracket, and the crank arm .is, in its assembled relationship, useable not only with the dual-slotted cone body 140 of FIGS. 10 and 11, but also with the single-slotted cone body 40 of FIGS. 1 to 9, inclusive. The height of the compression bracket 257 is such that if the'reaction plate 251 is positioned on the slab S of FIG. 6, for example, and in vertical alignment with one of the setting cone bodies40, the torque stem 144 is of insufficient length to reach the lift rod 38 and, in such an instance, the four-piece assembly willfunction in the manner previously ascribed to it for cone extraction purposes by utilizing the upper surface of the slab as a reaction surface instead of using the embedded anchor insert for this purpose.

The invention v is not to be limited to the exact arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawings or described in this specification as various changes in the details of construction may be resorted to without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. For example, whereas the three exemplary forms of anchor inserts 10, l 10 and 220 which are illustrated herein embody specific anchor rod shapes, the inserts 10 and 220 being generally in the form of foundation supported chair-like structures, and the insert 110 being in the form of a freely suspended loop, various other rod shapes may be devised to accommodate the particular concrete" form installation, the only requisite being that the anchor insert of FIGS. 1 to 6 be provided with a suitable flattened section similar to the sections 38 and 138 for reception by the slot 50 of the setting cone body 40 in the manner previously described. Additionally, various uses other than those -described herein are contemplated for the herein describedsetting cones l2 and 212 and the anchor inserts 10, T10 and 220. If desired, these anchor inserts may be employed for the production of an exposed reaction anchor bar in the outer side of a concrete wall or ceiling and-to which various items of concretev hardware may be secured. Therefore, only insofar as the invention is particularly pointed out in the accompanying claims is the same to be limited.

Having thus described the invention what I claim as new and desire, to secure by letters patent is:

1. In combination, an anchor insert and a cooperating setting cone adapted for assembly upon each other and initial embedment in a precast concrete body for subsequent cone removal, said anchor insert including an embedment rod and said setting cone embodying a solid inverted frusto-conical body having its lower small end face provided with a substantially diametrically disposed slot designed for reception therein of a medial region of the embedment rod with the furcations which are established by said slot straddling the rod, the setting cone body, when thus embedded, constituting a hole-forming pattern member in the precast concrete body, said setting cone body being provided 1 which it establishes in the concrete body.

2."The combination set forth in claim 1 and wherein said embedment rod is comprised of cylindrical rod stock and said medial region thereof is flattened so as to provide parallel outer flat sides, the transverse thickness of said medial flattened region being substantially equal to the width of the slot in the frusto-conical body whereby, when the embedment rod is received in the slot, said furcations and flat sides are effective to prevent relative tilting between the setting cone and the anchor insert. a

3. The combination set forth in claim 2 and including, additionally, detent means effective between at least one of said furcations and the medial region of the embedment rod to maintain the flattened region of the embedment rod bottomed in the slot;

4. The combination set forth in claim 3 and wherein said detent means comprises a spring-pressed detent ball slidable within a bore in said furcation and engageable with the surface portion of the flattened region of the embedment rod that is remote from the torque stem when said region is bottomed in the slot and thus fully received thereby.

5. The combination set forth in claim 4 and wherein similar detent means are effective between both of said furcations and the flattened region of the embedment rod.

6. The combination set forth in claim 5 and wherein said detent means are effective against said flattened region of the embedment rod at spaced regions therealong and on opposite sides of the mid-point of such flattened region.

7. The combination set forth in claim 6 and including, additionally, a resilient elastomeric filler strip adapted to be forced into said slot in the frusto-conical body after the flattened region of the embedment rod has been received in the slot and on the side of said flattened region remote from the torque stem, said filler strip serving to exclude the entrance of poured concrete into the slot.

8. The combination set forth in claim 7 and wherein said torque stem is capable, by an unthreading operation, of removal from said threaded bore and the setting cone further includes a threaded fastening bolt which is capable for threaded reception in said bore and by means of which the frusto-conical body may be clamped with the large end face thereof drawn hard against a concrete form side with the flattened region of the embedment rod operatively received within said slot preparatory to concrete pouring operations.

9. The combination set forth in claim 8 and wherein said anchor insert is in the form of a closed loop of ing setting cone adapted for assembly upon each other and initial embedment in a precast concrete body for subsequent cone removal, said anchor insert including a pair of spaced apart parallel embedment rods and said setting cone embodying a solid frusto-conical body having its lower small end face provided with a pair of transversely extending parallel spaced apart slots designed for reception therein of the medial regions of said embedment rods with the furcations which are established by the slots straddling the rods, the setting cone body, when thus embedded, constituting a holeforming pattern member in the precast concrete body, said setting cone body being provided with an internally threaded axial bore, a rotatable torque rod treadedly received in said bore, and a compression bracket having an opening therein through which the torque stem loosely projects, and depending leg portions, a flat reaction plate secured to the lower ends of said depending leg portions and designed for direct seating upon said concrete body and having a central opening therein through which said cone body is adapted to be pulled upwardly from the hole which it establishes in the concrete body upon tightening of the torque stem within the cone body, and means establishing a thrust bearing between said torque stem and said compression bracket.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification52/125.4, 52/577, 52/704, 52/701, 249/66.1
International ClassificationE04G21/14, E04G15/00, E04G15/04, E04B1/41, B28B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28B23/005, E04B1/4121, E04G21/142, E04G15/04
European ClassificationB28B23/00S, E04G21/14B, E04B1/41D1, E04G15/04