Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3705723 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 12, 1972
Filing dateJan 29, 1971
Priority dateJan 29, 1971
Publication numberUS 3705723 A, US 3705723A, US-A-3705723, US3705723 A, US3705723A
InventorsCharles J Eissler
Original AssigneeCharles J Eissler
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Baseball game
US 3705723 A
Abstract
A baseball game suitable to simulate an actual baseball game including a bat rotatable by one of the players to hit a disc-like ball pitched by another player and a pitching arm for directing the disc-like ball toward the bat. The said pitching arm is freely movable behind a pitching line to direct fast balls, slow balls and curve balls toward the rotatable bat as determined by the actions of one of the players. The game also includes a game board defining an infield and an outfield and a movable right, left and center field fence which may be positioned with respect to the infield and outfield to simulate the actual dimensions of any selected major league stadium.
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

States Patent Eliifi i.

Eissier 51 Dec. 12, 1972 [54] BASEBALL GAME [22] Filed: Jan. 29, 1971 [21] Appl. No.2 110,995

3,576,325 4/1971 Naturale ..273/89 Primary Examiner -AntOn O. Oechsle Assistant Examiner-Paul E. Shapiro Attorneyl(arl L. Spivak [57] p ABSTRACT A baseball game suitable to simulate an actual baseball game including a bat rotatable by one of the players to hit a disc-like ball pitched by another player and a pitching arm for directing the disc-like ball toward the bat. The said pitching arm is freely movable behind a pitching line to direct fast balls, slow balls and curve balls toward the rotatable bat as determined by the actions of one of the players. The game also includes a game board defining an infield and an outfield and a movable right, left and center field fence which may be positioned with respect tothe infield and outfield to simulate the actual dimensions of any selected major league stadium.

4 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures SHEEI 1 [1F 2 PATENTEI] DEC 1 2 I972 INVENTOR.

CHARLES J. EISSLER ATTORNEY PATENTED DEC 12 I972 3. 705. 723

sum 2 0F 2 FIG.4

72 6O 16 8 L s "1:. 55+;

INVENTOR. CHARLES J. EISSLER MA /{W ATTORNEY.

BASEBALL GAME BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to the general field of game device, more particularly is directed to dynamic type of baseball game readily adaptable to simulate actual playing conditions and situations.

I am aware of many prior art types of baseball games which have been developed primarily because of the great interest of children and adults in the game of baseball. Baseball is extremely popular both among children, as active players and among adults as a spectator sport. Because of the popularity of the game of baseball, it is generally referred to as the national sport of the United States. I am aware of one game which employs a playing board which is subdivided into delineated areas having a plurality of plays marked within the respective areas. Checkers are used in conjunction with the game board together with dice to determine the placing of the checkers. Depending upon final resting place of the various checkers after the play, the simulated baseball play is then announced to the player.

I am also familiar with a game apparatus for playing a baseball game which includes a game board and a launcher which is pivotal with respect to the board. The launcher projects magnetized cylinders which roll from the launcher to determine the scope of the play. Other games developed by prior workers in the art have included relatively complicated electrical circuitry which electrically determine the type of play in response to various initiating devices such as springs, plungers, walls, cards, and other devices. All of the prior art games of which I am familiar are generally ineffective in stimulating player interest in thatactual baseball game situations cannot be readily duplicated. Additionally, there is no means presently available to play the game in a manner dependent upon the respective skills and dexterity of the players themselves. All of the prior devices above set forth depend upon chance rather than skill in playing the game.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates to a board type baseball game and includes apparatus and means to simulate actual baseball game situations and plays.

The present invention includes a playing board in the form of a simulated baseball diamond wherein a plurality of players may be positioned about the infield and outfield as desired by the participants. A separate pitching arm is included which permits propelling a disc like projectile toward a movable bat which is operable by one of the participants who then attempts to hit the projectile into the playing field. The pitching arm includes means to precisely direct the type of pitch to be delivered including fast balls, slow balls, curves, knuckle balls, etc. Players may be positioned about the infield and outfield in the locations most likely to intercept projectiles propelled by the player operating the bat, to thereby increase interest in the game, by simulating actual playing conditions. A simulated outfield fence is provided which includes a means to relocate the fence in various positions with respect to the playing field. In this manner, the dimensions of actual playing field of well known stadiums throughout the country can be relatively closely simulated to scale by readily varying the dimensions of the playing field.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved baseball game of the type set forth.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel baseball game that includes pitching means capable of varying the speed and direction of a simulated ball.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel baseball game which incorporates player operated hitting means responsive to the manipulation by one of the players. 1

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel baseball game incorporating readily movable simulated players which may be positioned upon a playing board to intercept simulated balls impelled by player operated hitting means.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel baseball game including a game board to simulate a baseball playing field and further including means to vary the relative location of the outfield fence to simulate actual well-known baseball stadiums.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel baseball game including pitching means, hitting means and player positioning means to simulate a baseball game wherein the skill of the players can determine the course of the game.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel baseball game that is simple in design, inexpensive in manufacture, and trouble-free when in use.

Other objects and a fuller understanding of the invention will be had by referring to the following description and claims of a preferred embodiment thereof taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings wherein like reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views and in which:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a game board fabricated in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged prospective view of a pitching arm placed upon a practice stand.

FIG. 3 is a partial, enlarged, perspective view showing the batting means.

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, partial elevational view taken along Line 4-4 of FIG. 1, looking the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged, cross sectional view taken along Line 5-5 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, perspective view of a simulated player.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken along Line 77 of FIG. 2, looking in the direction of the arrows.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION Although specific terms are used in the description for the sake of clarity, these terms are intended to refer only to the particular structure of my invention selected for illustration in the drawings, and are not intended to define or limit the scope of the invention.

Referring now to the drawings, I show in FIG. 1 a baseball game including a generally rectangular game board 10, which is imprinted or otherwise treated to simulate a usual baseball infield playing area 12. In addition to the usual three bases and home plate 24, the game board also includes a pitching line 14 extending between the right and left foul line 16, 18. The pitching line 14 extends at right angles to a line drawn through home plate to second base. A pair of right and left sockets 20, 22 position on either side of the home plate 24, to accommodate either a simulated right hand batter or left hand batter as hereinafter more fully set forth.

A flexible member 26 extends outwardly from the right foul line 16 and endwardly carries an outfield positioning card 28 which is punched or otherwise treated to provide a plurality socket 30. The sockets 30 are spaced along the length of the card 28 for adjusting the position of the outfield fence 32 as hereinafter more fully explained. Similarly, a left flexible member 34 extends from the left foul line 18 and endwardly carries the left outfield positioning card 36. The card 36 is punched or otherwise treated to provide a plurality of spaced sprockets 38 for adjusting the relative position of the outfield fence 32 with respect to the game board if in cooperation with the right outfield positioning card 28.

A plurality of simulated players 40 randomly position upon the game board 10 to simulate infield baseball players and other simulates players 40 randomly position in the space defined between the game board 110 and the outfield fence 32 to simulate outfield baseball players. A separate pitching arm 42 is employed to propel a disc like, simulated ball 44, toward the home plate 24 for impacting uponthe simulated bat 46 for the game playing purposes as hereinafter more fully set forth.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 7, the pitching arm 42 comprises an elongate, generally rectangular member which preferably is fabricated of an inexpensive, easily manufactured, rigid material such as wood. A longitudinally extending slot h projects downwardly from the top surface 52 a distance sufficient to provide a satisfactory runway and guide for the simulated ball 44 as it is pitched toward the home plate 24. if desired, the pitching arm may be ornamented to simulate a pitchers hand 54 to add a touch of realism to the game. As best observed in FIG. 1, the pitching arm 42 is utilized to direct the simulated ball 44 towards the home plate 24 by positioning the leading edge 56 anywhere on the game board W behind the pitching line 14 and between the foul lines l6, 18. The simulated ball 44 is preferably fabricated to disc like configuration and is made of metal, heavy cardboard, fiber or other material suitable for rolling upon the game board toward the home plate 24. The simulated ball 44 cooperates with the pitching arm slot 50 and is rollable therein. It will be appreciated that the simulated ball 44 will roll down the pitching arm slot at increased rates of speed as the pitching arm is inclined at greater angular positions to the game board Mb. The ball 44 will roll down the pitching arm slot when the pitching arm regularly inclines with respect to the game board 10.

The simulated bat 46 comprises an upright post 58 which is insertable at one end thereof into the right or left socket 20, 22 which is provided on the game board 10) on either side of the home plate 24. A batting arm 60 projects at right angles from the upright post 58 and spaces from the lower terminus 62 of the batting post 58 a distance sufficient to sweep across the top surface of the home plate 24 to contact the simulated ball 44 as it rolls across the home plate. The upper portion 64 of the post 58 is grasped by the fingers (not shown) of one player and is revolved therein to rotate the lower terminus of the post within the board positioned right or left socket 20, 22. Revolving the post 58 causes the affixed batting arm 60 to sweep across the board surface above the home plate 24 to simulate the actual swinging of a bat. When the simulated bat rotates within the right socket 20 the batting action of a left handed player is imitated. When positioned in the left socket 22, the batting action of a right handed player is imitated. See FIGS. 3 and 5.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 6, I show a simulated player 40 in the form of a rectangular card which is longitudinally bent to a generally triangular cross sectional configuration. The bent card includes a top ridge 66 and a pair of angularly disposed legs 68, depending therefrom. Each simulated player may be readily fabricated of relatively stiff material such as cardboard, light sheet metal, or similar relatively inflexible sheet material. Each simulated player is entirely self-supporting and may be readily positioned as desired upon the playing surface. The leg 68 or 70 facing toward home plate 24 serves to intercept a batted simulated ball 44 for game playing purposes.

Referring now to FIGS. 1 and 4, the outfield fence 32 is shown generally arcuate in shape to simulate the usual fence of an actual baseball playing field. The fence extends from the left outfield positioning card 36 to the right outfield positioning card 28 and is removably affixed thereto. Near each transverse end 78, of the outfield fence 32, a peg 72 vertically slides with relation to the outfield fence 32 and positions at each end of the fence to overlie the respective left and right outfield positioning cards 26, 36. Each peg 72 slides within a pair of vertically spaced, fence supported collars 74, 76 which secure near the bottom of the simulated fence at the lateral edges 78, 80 thereof. Each peg 72 is fabricated to a diameter suitable to fit within the respective outfield positioning sockets 30 and 38 to thereby support the respective lateral edges 78, 80 of the fence 32 in any desired respective location upon each outfield positioning card 28, 36. By pulling each peg 72 upwardly with respect to the outfield fence 32, the peg will ride clear of the sockets 30, 38 to thereby free the respective lateral edges 78, 80 of the outfield fence 32. Each lateral edge may then be moved nearer or further from home plate 24 as desired and then the peg 72 can be pushed into a socket 30 or 38 to secure the respective lateral edges of the outfield fence in the desired position. In this manner, by constructing the playing field to scale, the location of the outfield fence may be varied as desired to simulate the actual home plate to outfield fence distance along the right and left foul lines of the various major league baseball parks.

While it is contemplated that the game will usually be played by two persons, by providing a practice stand 82 as illustrated in FIG. 2, a single player may develop his skills by engaging in self-controlled batting practice. The stand 82 comprises a generally L-shaped bracket including a horizontal base 84 and a vertical support 86 which integrally rises from one edge of the base to form a self supporting structure. The stand should be relatively rigid in construction and strong enough to support the pitching arm 42 in the various angular pitching positions without undue deflection. Bent sheet metal, heavy cardboard or wood has been found suitable for this purpose. The upper edge 88 of the vertical support 86 is notched or otherwise treated to form a plurality of depressions 90, 92, 94 to support and direct the pitching arm during the pitching operation. The central depression 92 may be formed to a generally rectangular configuration to hold the elongate member 48 in a substantially horizontal plane. In this manner by positioning the pitching arm 42 directly in front of the home plate 24 with the leading edge 56 behind the pitching line M, straight pitches may be simulated by rolling the simulated ball 44 down the slot 50. By varying the angular relationship between the pitching arm 42 and the playing board 10, the simulated ball 44 may be urged down the inclined slot St) at a faster or slower rate of speed to thereby simulate fast and slow pitches. When desired, the pitching arm 24 may be positioned in either of the right or left depressions 9th, 94 to direct the simulated ball 44 across the plate in an angular relation. By laying the elongate member bottom 96 against either inclined surface 98, 1% of the depressions 90 or 94 the pitching arm rotatively angularly positions above the game board lll to impose a frictional spin upon the simulated ball 44 as it rubs against the interior wall 192 or 1% of the slot 50, to thus cause the simulated ball to curve during its path from the pitching arm to home plate.

In order to use this invention, the game board 10 is placed upon a flat surface, such as a table, or the floor, and the outfield wall 32 is erected with the pegs 72 inserted into the desired sockets. The first player (not shown) whose team is at bat inserts the bottom 62 of the bat 46 into either the right or the left socket on either side of the home plate 24 as desired to simulate either a right or left hand batter. By rotating the upper end of the bat shaft with the fingers, the horizontal bat portion 60 can be made to sweep swiftly across home place 24 in response to a pitched ball. When proper contact is made with the simulated ball 44, it will be driven into the playing field for scoring in the manner hereinafter set forth.

The second player (not shown) whose team is on the field positions the various simulated fielders 40 about the infield and outfield in various locations as desired. He then places the pitching arm 42 upon the board 10 with the leading edge 56 at the pitching line 14 for directing the ball 44 towards the home plate 24. It will be observed that the pitching arm may be placed anywhere between the right and left foul lines 16, 18 behind the pitching line 14 to deliver the ball across the home plate. Fast balls may be simulated by keeping both the ball 44 and the pitching arm 42 straight and by inclining the pitching arm at a greater angular relation to the game board 10, slow balls may be pitched by reducing the angle between the pitching arm and the game board. Curves can be produced by initiating the travel of the disc like ball 44 down the slot and then rotating the pitching arm until the device is almost sideways. Contact between the ball 44 and a side M92, we of the slot 50 imparts a frictional spin to the ball as it leaves the pitching arm. A knuckle ball may be simulated by placing a finger on top of the ball and the spinning the ball forwardly by pressing downwardly and forwardly to propel it down the slot 50 under the influence of the spin imparted by the fingers.

As the ball dd approaches the home plate 24, the bat 46 is swung to contact the simulated ball with the batting arm 66. Any ball that is impelled past the infield without hitting any of the players 40 or which does not hit an outfielder 40 is considered to be a single. Any ball that hits the fence 32 would be scored as a double and a ball that terminates its flight by leaning against the fence is scored as a triple. Any ball hit entirely overthe outfield fence 32 would be scored as a home run. Any batted ball that strikes a player 40 is scored as an out. Under proper circumstances double plays and sacrifice flies can also be scored. Of course, balls and strikes can be called in the usual manner by observing the path of the ball across the plate and the action of the bat with respect to the ball. It is contemplated that various rules for playing the game, such as double plays, triple plays, stealing, bunts, etc., may be devised to make the game most interesting to the players. Once the players have practiced sufficiently to acquire a degree of skill and proficiency in the game, various leagues can be organized by adding other players. The play can be simulated in the various major league parks by varying the dimensions of the outfield fence 32 from the home plate 241 in the manner hereinbefore set forth.

I claim:

1. In a baseball game the combination of A. a game board generally defining an infield area and a simulated baseball diamond including a home plate;

B. an outfield fence spaced from the said game board, the outfield fence generally defining an outfield area between the fence and the game board, said outfield fence having lateral edges;

C. a pitching arm separate from the game board and movable with relation to the game board,

1. said pitching arm including an elongate member having a longitudinal slot depressed therein,

2. the said pitching arm directing simulated balls toward the said home plate;

D. batting means rotatable in the game board to strike the said ball,

1. said batting means removably positioning in the game board on the one side of the said plate,

2. said batting means including an upright member and a horizontal member attached to the upright member near the bottom thereof for striking the said ball, and

E. outfield fence position adjusting means suitable to vary the spacing of the outfield fence from the said game board, said adjusting means being positioned so as not to interfere with the action of play in the outfield area.

2. The invention of claim l, wherein the outfield fence position adjusting means includes a pair of arcuately spaced outfield positioning cards spaced from the said game board, the outfield positioning cards removably securing the respective lateral edges of the outfield fence in any one of a number of positions spaced from the said home plate.

slideably with respect to a lateral edge of the outfield fence, the peg being removably insertable within one of said sockets to temporarily secure the lateral edge of the fence in position above the said socket in spaced position from the home plate.

l i t

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1008898 *Mar 22, 1909Nov 14, 1911William G FultonGame device.
US1048047 *Jul 24, 1906Dec 24, 1912Greely S CurtisMechanical ball game.
US2775457 *Aug 3, 1951Dec 25, 1956Ferdinand F GalbosSimulated baseball game
US2802667 *Jul 8, 1954Aug 13, 1957Robert G BertleyBaseball game apparatus
US2980427 *Jan 15, 1958Apr 18, 1961Thomas W CraggBaseball game
US3358997 *Apr 22, 1965Dec 19, 1967Franklin D BelzMechanically batted toy baseball game
US3381961 *Oct 18, 1965May 7, 1968John R. WrightBaseball game using various shaped discs to represent various types of pitches
US3576325 *Oct 16, 1969Apr 27, 1971Richard J NaturaleBaseball game
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3834703 *Mar 27, 1973Sep 10, 1974G DlouhyBaseball game
US4519610 *Aug 12, 1983May 28, 1985Kallio Leo WSimulated baseball game
US4822043 *Mar 25, 1987Apr 18, 1989Carter Lewis SBaseball card game
US4948135 *Feb 17, 1989Aug 14, 1990Follety Jr Philip ABaseball game
US6533272Nov 29, 2000Mar 18, 2003Regent Sports CorporationBaseball game apparatus
US6695308 *Feb 5, 2003Feb 24, 2004Regent Sport CorporationBaseball game apparatus
US7648141May 9, 2008Jan 19, 2010Douglas William StrohmBaseball simulation game
US7766337Aug 19, 2008Aug 3, 2010Soarex, Inc.Game apparatus
US20080277868 *May 9, 2008Nov 13, 2008Douglas William StrohmBaseball simulation game
US20100044964 *Aug 19, 2008Feb 25, 2010Soarex, Inc.Game Apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/108.31
International ClassificationA63F7/06
Cooperative ClassificationA63F7/0608
European ClassificationA63F7/06A1