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Publication numberUS3706440 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1972
Filing dateOct 19, 1970
Priority dateOct 19, 1970
Also published asDE2151875A1
Publication numberUS 3706440 A, US 3706440A, US-A-3706440, US3706440 A, US3706440A
InventorsRoss Howard C
Original AssigneeKinkead Industries
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tail block for carpet stretching tool
US 3706440 A
Abstract
A carpet stretching tool with a tail block constructed to permit abutment against the intersection of two projecting vertical wall surfaces, as well as abutment against flat wall surfaces. The improved tail block of the carpet stretching tool is adapted to engage two vertically extending surfaces angularly disposed adjacent each other, as well as a single vertical surface.
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United States Patent I Ross [4 Dec. 19, 1972 [54] TAIL BLOCK FOR CARPET 3,207,474 9/1965 Silva ..254/57 STRETCHING TOOL 1,877,367 9/1932 Seppmann ..254/D1G. 5 [72] Inventor: Ward C. Ross, Chicago, "L 2,711,228 6/1955 Shank ..254/DlG. 5

[73] Assignee: Kinkead Industries, Inc., Chicago, Primary Examiner0thell M. Simpson 111. Attorney-Hume, Clement, Hume & Lee

[22] Filed: I Oct. 19, 1970 [57] I ABSTRACT [21] Appl' 81818 v A carpet stretching tool with a tail block constructed to permit abutment against the intersection of two [52] US. Cl ..254/62 projecting vertical wal u aces, as ell as abutment [51] Int. Cl. ..A47g 47/04 against flat wall surfaces. The improved tail block of [58] Field of Search ..254/57-63, 134 H, the carpet stretching tool is adapted to engage two 254/134 B; 248/222 vertically extending surfaces angularly disposed adjacent each other, as well as a single vertical surface. [56] References Cited 11 C1aims,4Drawing Figures TAIL BLOCK FOR CARPET STRETCI-IING TOOL This invention relates to a novel carpet stretching tool, and in particular, to a novel tail block subcombination forming part of the carpet stretching tool which enables the tool to abut flat wall surfaces and projecting, intersecting wall surfaces, as distinguished from a corner.

During the installation of wall-to-wall carpeting in a room by a carpet laying mechanic, tacking boards, commonly known as tackless stripping, are secured to the floor around the periphery of the area to be covered adjacent the intersection of the vertical walls with the floor. The carpet is placed over and secured to the tacking boards located on one side of the room, and a carpet stretching tool is used to stretch the opposite ends of the carpet prior to securing the carpet to the remaining tacking boards. In using the conventional carpet stretcher, a tail block or butt plate located at one end of the tool is placed against one wallof the room. The other end of the tool comprises a carpet-engaging head provided with pins or studs that engage the carpet. Telescoping tube or pipe sections are used to move the carpet-engaging head into position across the room from where the tail block abuts the wall. A toggle-type mechanism near the portion of the telescoping sections opposite the tail block is used to move the carpet-engaging head away from the tail block after the pins in the head have engaged the carpet. This movement stretches the carpet, and enables the mechanic to properly secure the carpet to the remaining tacking boards.

The type of tail block in prior use with carpet stretching tools consists of a flat, outwardly extending surface which is particularly suitable for engaging flat wall portions. However, it was found that in laying carpet in L-shaped rooms, such as found in living roomdining room combinations in modern houses and apartments, the telescoping portion of the carpet stretcher is ultimately employed at an acute angle relative to the plane of the wall with which the tail block abuted. This occurs when stretching the carpet into the corner diagonally opposite the projecting intersecting wall surfaces forming the L-shaped room. Using the carpet stretching tool in this manner caused a force to act on the tail block tending to move it, and the stretching tool, laterally along the wall. To prevent this undesirable movement it was found necessary to station a workman with his foot placed against the tail block to prevent it from slipping when using the carpet stretching tool. However, this method was discovered to be ineffective due to the workmans inability to counteract the magnitude of the force exerted on the tail block while stretching the carpet. As a result, the carpet would not be fully and efficiently stretched due to slippage of the tail block.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a carpet stretcher with a novel tail block which will enable the quick andefficient installation of carpet in hard-to-reach corners of an irregularly shaped room such as an L-shaped room comprising projecting, intersecting vertical wall surfaces. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a carpet stretcher wherein the tail block will engage projecting, intersecting vertical wall surfaces in a room where wall-to-wall carpeting is being installed, such that the tail block will be prevented from sipping laterally regardless of the direction of forces acting on the tail block as a result of varying the direction in which the telescoping sections and carpet-gripping head of the stretching tool are extended.

' Still another object of the present invention is to provide a carpet stretching tool which may be used to abut projecting, intersecting vertical wall surfaces, and may also be used, without modification or change of parts, to engage normal flat wall surfaces when necessary. The bearing surfaces of the improved tail block for the carpet stretcher are also covered by layers of a resilient material to prevent damage to the wall surfaces against which the tail block abuts.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a carpet stretching tool which is simple in construction and will endure long life in its intended usage. The novel tail block subcombination may be easily installed on all conventional carpet stretchingtools, and therefore, is economical both to the manufacturer and the user.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear as the specification continues.

. To fully understand the invention, reference should be made to the accompanying drawing, forming part of the specification, in which:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the carpet stretcher embodying the features of the present invention, showing the improved tail block abutting aflat, vertical wall surface;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of one end of the carpet stretching tool of FIG. 1, illustrating the improved tail block abutting against projecting, intersecting wall surfaces, such as' found in an L-shaped room;

FIG. 3 is a detail plan view of the tail block subcombination illustrating the relative positions of the intersecting and co-planer surfaces of the body of the preferred embodiment of the tail block; and

FIG. 4 is a detail elevation view of a preferred embodiment of the tail block.

While the drawing shows the preferred form of my invention, it should be understood that various changes, or modifications, may be made within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of the invention herein.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION A carpet stretching tool is indicated in FIG. I by the numeral 10. The novel features of my invention lie in the combination of the carpet stretcher 10 embodying the improved tail block 50. The carpet stretcher 10 includes an elongated tubular member made in telescoping sections 12 and 14. Tubular member 14 is slidably disposed within larger diametered tubular member 12. A row of openings 16 is provided in tubular member 14, and a similar TOW of openings 18 is provided in tubular member 12. The two tubular members 12 and 14 may be longitudinally adjusted with respect to each other to vary the length of the carpet stretcher 10. When the desired length is achieved, at least one of the openings 16 will align with one of the openings 18. A connecting pin 20 is placed in the aligned openings, and prevents further movement of tubular member 14 within tubular member 12.

A tubular extension 22 projects from the left hand end of tubular member 14 as shown in FIG. 1, and is rigidly affixed thereto. A flange 24 projects laterally from extension 22. A pair of links 26 are pivotally secured to either side of flange 24 at pivot 28, and have their other ends pivotally secured at 30 to a lever handle 32. One end of handle 32 is pivotally secured at 34 to a flange 36 which is attached to the top of carpet-engaging head 38. The other end of handle 32 includes hand gripping member 40 whereby a carpet laying mechanic may move handle 32 downward by applying manual pressure to hand gripping member 40. A tubular section 42 has one end secured to flange 36 and has its other end slidably disposed in tubular extension 22. The carpet engaging head 38 has nap-gripping fingers or pins 44 rigidly embedded therein, which'pins or fingers are able to penetrate the tufted pile of a carpet, as well as a looped pile or soft-backed carpet, and firmly engage the napping of the carpet material.

The carpet stretching tool also comprises a tail block, generally denoted 50 in FIG. 1, pivotally -attached to the end of the carpet stretching tool opposite carpet-engaging head 38. The details of the tail block 50, which comprisethe novel features of the present invention, will later be explained. In using the carpet stretcher 10, the tail block 50 is placed against a supporting surface, such as a wall 11. Telescoping tubular members 12 and 14 are positioned to locate the carpet engaging head 38 across the room from where tail block 50 abuts wall 1 1. It will be understood that where a carpet is to be installedin a large room, additional sections of tubular members 12 and 14 may be used until the desired distance between carpet gripping head 38 and tail block 50 has been achieved.

When the pins 44 of carpet-engaging head 38 engage the carpet that is to be stretched, the carpet laying mechanic manually engages grip 40 and rotates handle 32 from an upright or inoperative position to a downward or operative position. In this latter mode, the handle 32 cooperates with the links 26 to produce a v toggle spreading effect on the tubular section 42, and will move section 42 from extension 22, a distance sufficient to cause the head 38 to stretch the carpet. The reaction force against links 26 is provided by the stationary positioning of tubular elements 12 and 14 against the wall 11 opposite the point where the head 38 engages the carpet. Tail block 50 abuts the wall 11, and provides a bearing surface to distribute the compressive force created in the carpet stretcher when handle 32 is moved downward to stretch the carpet.

The improved tail block 50, which is shown in detail in FIGS. 3 and 4, cooperates with carpet stretcher 10 to produce a new combination of elements. The tail block 50 comprises a plate-like vertically extending body 52 which is preferably formed from cast aluminum to reduce the weight of the tail block. However, the tail block body 52 maybe constructed of other suitable material such as steel or iron, for example, if desired. The tail block body 52 of the preferred embodiment is generally V-shaped or notched in plan configuration (FIG. 3), with extensible flange portions 54 extending substantially co-planer from the outward extending ends of the V-shaped portion of the body 52. The V configuration of body 52 comprises sloping portions 56 and 58 that extend inwardly from extensible flange portions 54. Portions 56 and 58 meet in the dwell of the V where they intersect.

One side of each of sloping portions 56 and 58 include abutting means comprising outwardly facing vertically extending surfaces 60, 62, which surfaces are disposed adjacentone another and intersect at an included angle formed by the V configurationof portions 56 and 58. In the preferred embodiment, as best seen in FIG. 3, the included angle is shown as 90. This is desirable in most instances, since in a normal room, projecting walls such as walls 13 and 15 in FIG. 2 intersect at an angle of 90. However, theincluded angle between surfaces 60 and 62 may be modified within the scope of my invention to encompass any special situation where the projecting walls intersect at an angle other than 90. The outwardly facing surfaces of flange portions 54 also include abutting means comprising vertically extending co-planer surfaces 64 and 66 which are adjacent the nonfintersecting ends of the intersecting, vertically extending surfaces 60 and 62 respectively. Surfaces 60, 62, 64 and 66 are substantially flat and are adapted to abut against a vertical wall surface, as will be explained.

Affixed to outwardly extending vertical surfaces 60 and'64 is a resilient covering 68 which is mounted by means of screws 70 to tail block body 52. The covering 68 fits snug against surfaces 60 and 64, and follows the contour of these surfaces through the obtuse angle formed by-the intersection of surfaces 60 and 64. In like manner, a resilient covering 72 is mounted by means of screws 74 to outwardly extending surfaces 62 and 66 of tail block body 52. Covering 72 follows the contour of surfaces 62 and 66 through the obtuse angle formed by the intersection of these two surfaces. Coverings 68 and 72 extend throughout the vertical length of surfaces 60, 62, 64 and 66 as seen in FIG. 4. The coverings 68, 72 also extend laterally slightly beyond the outer end of each flange portion 54 to eliminate any exposed metal or hardened surfaces which would tend to cause damage upon contact with a wall surface. Coverings 68 and 72 may, within the scope of the present invention, be made of a material such as rubber, or any other resilient material which will protect the wall surfaces from damage. Also, coverings 68 and 74 may be mounted to surfaces 60, 62, 64 and 66 by any suitable means such as adhesive, clamps, etc.

At the point in body 52 where slopingportions 56 and 58 intersect, a laterally extending opening 76 (FIG. 4) is provided. A vertical hole 78 extends through the tail block body 52 where sloping portions 56 and 58 intersect, and a pin 80 is inserted through hole 78. Ad-

justably and pivotally connected to pin 80 and disposed which slope rearwardly and downwardly from the bottom edges of extensible flange portions 54, and also partially extend along the outer extremities of sloping portions 56 and 58. The purpose of flange members 86 and 88 is to raise the tail block above any quarterround molding trim which might be located at the intersection of a wall with the floor.

The tail block body 52 may also comprise horizontally extending flange means 90 disposed above and below surfaces 60, 62, 64 and 66. The purpose of flange means 90 is'to maintain the position of resilient coverings 68 and 72 against surfaces 60, 62, 64 and 66 so that the coverings do not slip vertically when under a compressive load.

From the foregoing description of the various features of my invention, the operation thereof will be readily understood. The carpet stretcher with my improved tail block 50 installed is illustrated in FIG. 1, abutting a flat wall surface 11. In FIG. 2, the tail block is illustrated abutting the projecting intersection of two w'all surfaces l3, 15, such as found, for example, in an L-shaped room. Considering the embodiment of FIG. 1 first, the wall-to-wall carpet has already been secured along one edge to the floor adjacent the wall surface 1 1. The carpet laying mechanic places the tail block 50 against the wall 1 l. The portions of resilient coverings 68 and 72 mounted to the outwardly extending coplaner abutting means or surfaces 64 and 66 of flange portions 54 come into direct contact with wall surface 1 l. The total area of abutting means or surfaces 64 and 66 is sufficient to provide adequate spreading of the bearing load acting on the wall as a result of the carpet stretching operation. Surfaces 64 and 66 are disposed in the same plane, thereby enabling the resilient coverings 68 and 72 to lie flush against wall surface 11 as they would were they a single, continuous surface of a conventional tail block.

The carpet laying mechanic then adjusts the effective length of tubular members 12 and 14 to place the carpet engaging head 38 near the opposite wall, not shown. Pin is inserted through aligned openings 16, 18 in the tubular members. The carpet-engaging head 38 is moved toward the carpet to cause the fingers 44 to enter and grip the napping of the carpet.

Lever 32 is moved downward and links 26 function as a toggle for moving head 38 towards the adjacent wall, thereby stretching the carpet. When stretching the carpet, a force is applied against the tail block 50, and this force will be spread over the entire area of the surface portions of the tail block in flush contact with the wall 11. By spreading this force, tail block 50 is prevented from being forced through wall 1 1.

Occasionally it is necessary to stretch a carpet in a portion of a room where there is no available opposing wall surface against which tail block 50 may be placed. For example, in an L-shaped room, a problem is encountered in stretching the carpet in that portion of the room which is diagonally opposite the projecting intersection of the wall surfaces 13 and 15, as shown in FIG. 2. If the tail block of the carpet stretching tool is placed along either of the flat surfaces of wall 13 and 15, the tubular member 12 and 14 of the too] would have to swing through a considerable horizontal arc in order to engage the carpet in the far corner of the room. It can readily be appreciated from observing the carpet stretching tool 10 of FIG. 1 that if the tubular members 14 and 16, and head 38, were moved in a horizontal plane of 45, for example, the stretching operation would produce a lateral component of the force acting on wall 11, which component will tend to slide the tail block along the wall. Such sliding reduces the ability of the stretching tool to stretch the carpet to the proper degree, thereby resulting in a loose fitting carpet.

My invention overcomes this shortcoming in previous carpet stretchers and enables a carpet laying mechanic to efficiently stretch a carpet in any part of an L-shaped room without any lost motion due to slippage. As shown in FIG. 2, when it is desired to stretch carpet in the deep corner, of an L-shaped room, the two intersecting, vertically extending abutting means or surfaces 60 and 62 of the tail block, with their respective resilient coverings 68 and 72, are placed against the projecting intersecting walls 13 and 15. In most modern homes and apartments embodying an L-shaped room, the room areas are at right angles to. each other, thereby causing walls 13 and 15 to intersect at right angles. Therefore, for most uses, the included angle between intersecting abutting means or surfaces 60 and 62 of tail block body 52 is 90. However, if it is desired to lay wall-to-wall carpeting in a room of different design where'walls intersect at angles other than 90, it is within the scope of my invention to construct a tail block 50 wherein the included angle between surfaces 60 and 62 is greater than or less than 90, as required.

With the resilient coverings 68, 72 adjacent intersecting surfaces 60 and 62 of tail block 50 placed against the intersection of walls 13 and 15 (FIG. 2), the carpet stretcher 10 may be'extended across the room so that the pins 44 of head 38 engage that portion of the carpet diagonally opposite the intersection of walls 13 and 15. The tail block 50, constructed in accordance with the present invention, will provide an adequate, secure bearing surface which will prevent slippage of the tail block when the carpet stretching tool 10 is used in any one of a number of angular positions relative to the' tail block 50, which positions are obtained by swinging tubular member l2, 14 through a substantial are about pin (FIG. 3). When'the tail block 50 is located in the position illustrated in FIG. 2, the coplaner surfaces 64 and 66 extend harmlessly away from walls 13 and 15, and do not impair the proper function of the tail block.

The foregoing embodiment is exemplary of the method and apparatus of the disclosed invention, and may be used as a model for constructing the invention. However, many variations of the disclosed device may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the following claims.

Iclaim:

1. A carpet stretching tool adapted to stretch a carpet during installation in a room having projecting intersecting wall surfaces comprising:

means for gripping the carpet;

adjustable means attached at one end to said gripping means to move said gripping means in a direction away from said wall surfaces;

tail block means pivotally connected to the other end of said telescoping adjustable means;

said tail block means comprising a body having at least two intersecting vertically extending abutting means disposed adjacent one another with an included angle between said abutting means, wherein said tail block is adapted to enable said other end of said carpet stretching tool to abut said projecting intersecting wall surfaces under a compressive load without slippage.

2. The carpet stretching tool of claim 1 wherein:

said included angle between said vertically'extending abutting means of said tail block body is approximately 90. I

3. The carpet stretching tool of claim 1 further including:

a resilient layer covering each of said vertically extending abutting means of said tail block body, which resilient layers are adapted to contact said intersecting wall surfaces when said carpet stretcher is used.

4. The carpet stretcher of claim 1 wherein said tail block body further includes:

co-planer vertically extending abutting means adjacent the non-intersecting ends of said intersecting vertically extending abutting means.

5. The carpet stretcher of claim 4 further including:

a resilient layer covering each said coplaner vertically extending abutting means, which resilient layers are adapted to come into flush contact with a flat wall-surface whensaid carpet stretcher is used.

6. A tail block for a carpet stretcher comprising:

a body having at least two outwardly facing intersecting vertically extending abutting means disposed adjacent one another with an included angle between said abutting means and attachment means affixed to said body adapted t adjustably attach said tail block to said carpet stretcher. 5 7. The tail block for a carpet stretcher of claim 6 wherein:

said included angle between said intersecting vertically extending abutting means is approximately 90. 8. The tail block for a carpet stretcher of claim 6 wherein:

said attachment means is adjustably pivotally affixed 7 to said body at a point'adjacent the intersection of said two vertically extending abutting surfaces. 9. The tail block for a carpet stretcher of claim 6, further including:

a resilient layer covering each of said vertically extending abutting means. 1 10. The tail block for a carpet stretcher of claim 6 wherein said body further includes:

co-planer vertically extending abutting means adjacent the non-intersecting ends of said intersecting vertically extending abutting means. 11. The tail block for a carpet stretcher of claim 10 further including:

a resilient layer covering each said co-planer vertically extending abutting means.

intersecting

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US834535 *Mar 21, 1904Oct 30, 1906Emile PoirotCarpet-stretcher.
US1877367 *Oct 15, 1928Sep 13, 1932Alfred B SeppmannPedal depressing means for brake testers
US2711228 *Mar 30, 1951Jun 21, 1955Shank Wendell FloydBrake actuating device for towed vehicle
US3207474 *Sep 24, 1964Sep 21, 1965Silva Harold JTail block for carpet stretcher
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4538846 *Mar 24, 1980Sep 3, 1985Alexander Jerry MCarpet stretcher assembly
US4730858 *Jul 30, 1982Mar 15, 1988Humann Theodore NCarpet stretcher tool
US5150884 *Aug 3, 1990Sep 29, 1992Hyer Raymond ECarpet stretcher attachment utilizing pivotally mounted pulling plate
US5176387 *May 20, 1991Jan 5, 1993Taggart Troy DParallel wall carpet stretcher tool
US5269576 *Mar 24, 1992Dec 14, 1993Krebs Alex RAdjustable length hallway/doorway bridge carpet stretcher anchor and method of use
US5855361 *Mar 4, 1997Jan 5, 1999Krowchak; Michael A.Tail stock for a carpet stretcher
US5873614 *Jun 20, 1997Feb 23, 1999E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyAnchor for a carpet stretching apparatus
US5984274 *Jun 20, 1997Nov 16, 1999E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanySystem for stretching a carpet
US6161818 *Apr 7, 1999Dec 19, 2000E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanySystem for stretching a carpet
US6405999 *Nov 14, 2000Jun 18, 2002E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyConvertible stop for a floor covering stretching apparatus
US6669174Nov 12, 2002Dec 30, 2003Christopher L. VitaKneeless kicking tool for stretching a carpet
US7451961Mar 9, 2007Nov 18, 2008Crain Cutter Company, Inc.Tail section for carpet stretching tool
US7722012Feb 13, 2008May 25, 2010Crain Cutter Company, Inc.Tail section for carpet stretching tool
US8757595Mar 20, 2012Jun 24, 2014Marion T. GarzanelliCarpet stretcher and method of use
US20060169955 *Sep 27, 2005Aug 3, 2006Simonsen Kenneth MTail block assembly with multi-axis swivel joint and tail block system comprising same
US20080217593 *Feb 13, 2008Sep 11, 2008Crain Cutter Co.Tail section for carpet stretching tool
US20080217594 *Mar 9, 2007Sep 11, 2008Crain Cutter Company, Inc.Tail section for carpet stretching tool
Classifications
U.S. Classification254/212, 294/8.6
International ClassificationA47G27/00, A47G27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0493
European ClassificationA47G27/04E1