Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3707275 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1972
Filing dateSep 4, 1970
Priority dateSep 4, 1970
Also published asCA948617A1, DE2144330A1
Publication numberUS 3707275 A, US 3707275A, US-A-3707275, US3707275 A, US3707275A
InventorsCarter H Arnold
Original AssigneeCarter H Arnold
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hoisting device
US 3707275 A
Abstract
A hoisting device of the type in which a rope is wound around a drum to provide a plurality of windings in side by side substantially parallel relationship. The shunting of the rope from one winding to the adjacent winding and the tensioning of the rope is accomplished by rollers so as to provide automatic self-reeving action and to reduce power loss due to friction as well as minimizing rope wear and enhancing reliability of the hoisting apparatus.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent Arnold [541 HOISTING DEVICE [72] Inventor: Carter 11. Arnold, 317 Rocky Point Road, Palos Verdes Estates, Calif. 90274 [22] Filed: Sept. 4, 1970 [21] Appl. No.: 69,709

[52] U.S. Cl. ..254/150, 254/190, 242/117, 242/4701, 254/D1G. 11 [51] Int. Cl. ..B66d 1/30 [58] Field of Search.254/150, 190, DIG.1l;242/117, 242/4701, 54; 187/23 [56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 772,074 10/1904 Wellman ..187/23 2,917,279 12/1959 Arnold ..254/150 2,976,017 3/1961 Le Bus ..254/l90 2,922,623 1/1960 Simmons ..254/19 0 X 3,226,090 12/1965 Sauerbrey ..254/190 3,353,793 11/1967 Nelson .1..254/190 [151 3,707,275 [451 Dec. 26, 1.972

FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 112,967 111945 Sweden ..254/D1G. 11 L13,325 1/1956 Germany .....254/190 956,441 12/1956 Germany 656,661 Great Britain ..242/117 7 Primary Examiner-Harvey C. l-lornsby Assistant Examiner-Merle F. Maffei Attorney-Gordon Wood 51 ABSTRACT 12 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTEDBEM J R 3.707 275 sum 1 [1F 5 v ATTORNEY PATENTED DEC 2 6 I972 SHEET 2 [IF 5 .FIE- ,5

ATTOKA/fy PATENTED DEC 2 6 i972 SHEET 3 [1F 5 BY CANE/8 DT WM M arr-071 ATTORNEY PATENTEI'] DEC 26 m2 1 3 707' 2 75 sum u or 5 INVENTOR.

CARTER H. AKA/0Z0 Y Mar?! ATTOKNEV PATENTED DEC 2 6 1972 SHEET S 0F 5 FIE:-

INVENTOR (METER ARA/01D BY FICT 1Z HOIS'IING DEVICE This invention relates to an improved hoist of the type in which a rope is wound around a drum to provide a plurality of windings in side by side relationship. The invention provides certain improved features over the hoist diclosed in US. Pat. No. 3,063,653.

Prior art hoists of the subject type usually include a drum having a plurality of peripherally extending parallel grooves in which the rope windings are received and the shunting of' the rope from'one winding to an adjacent winding is accomplished by guide elements fixedly secured relative to the housing of the drum. Since the forces on the rope are normally quite high the engagement of the rope with the shunting elements has created a considerableamount of friction with its attendant loss of power'and has also caused wear on the rope and the shunting elements. 'By the present invention both wear and friction are minimized by providing rollers for shunting the rope from one winding to an adjacent winding. Furthermore, by the present invention the tension rollers which apply tension to the rope are driven in the direction of travel of the rope so as to further minimize wear and friction.

Another limitation of hoists of the type shown in US. Pat. No. 3,063,653 is that they are designed for use in hoisting applications wherein one end of the rope is always loaded and the other end is always slack. The hoist of the present invention lends itself to use in'hoisting applications wherein either end may be loaded or unloaded.

Another advantage of the present-invention is that a closed tamper proof housing is provided and the drum is made self-reeving by a unique arrangement of the tension and transfer rollers. With this self-reeving feature the proper operation of the rollers can not be in- .terfered with even by the operator and, when the drum is first reeved, it may be done simply by feeding the rope in an opening in the housing so that said rope is reeved around the drum and shunted from one groove to another automatically without intervention of the operator.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specification and from the drawings: I I I FIG. 1 is a side elevation of the hoist with one side broken away to show internal structure;

'FIG. 2 is a schematic perspective of the rope windings showing the manner in which the transfer rollers act on the rope;

FIG. 3 is a partial elevation and vertical section through the hoist taken in a plane indicated by lines 3 3 of FIG. 1; v

FIG. 4 is a schematic developed view of the rollers around the periphery of the drum showing their contours and arrangement relative to each other;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing the shunting action of the transfer rollers;

FIG. 6A is a schematic view of a portion of the drum periphery showing the manner in which the drum drives the rollers FIG. 6B is a view similar to FIG. 6A but with the drum rotating in the opposite direction;

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal section through a tension roller and the periphery of the drum as taken in a plane indicated by lines 7 --7 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 8 is a longitudinal section through a transfer roller and the periphery of the'drum as talten in a plane indicated by lines 8--8 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 9 is a schematic of a hoisting arrangement wherein both ends of the rope may be loaded;

FIG. 10 is a vertical sectional view partly in elevation of a modified rope guide for testing the straightness of the wire;

FIG. 11 is a fragmentary expanded top plan view of the drum periphery adjacent the-rope windings showing a modified form of the invention;

. FIG. 12 is a fragmentary cross section through the drum as taken in a plane indicated by lines 12-12 of FIG. 11. I

In detail, and first with reference to FIG. 3, the invention includes a housing generally designated. 1 which supports an electric motor or air motor 2 which in turn drives a worm gear 3 through a worm 4. The worm gear 3 drives a drum shaft 5 which in turn is rotatably supported on side plates 6,7 of housing .1. Control of the hoist may be'effected by switches (not shown) actuated by handle 8. Fixedly secured to shaft 5 is the hoisting drum 10. In the particular application shown in FIGS. 1,3 a scaffold or other load may be con nected to housing 1 by support member 9.

The periphery of drum 10 is provided with a plurality of circumferentially extending parallel grooves which are numbered 11 to 16 from right to left in FIGS. 7 and 8. As will be seen later on the tension end 18 of rope 20 is received in the first groove 11 and extends substantially 300 around said groove until it is shunted to groove 12. The rope is wrapped in groove 12 for substantially 300 until it is shunted to groove 12 and so on until the rope is fed off groove'l6 to constitute the tail end or slack end 19 of the rope.

The shunting from groove. 11 to groove 12 is performed by a transfer roller 21 (see FIGS. 1, 4 and 5). Similarly the transfer from groove 12 to groove 13 is performed by a transfer roller 22. In like manner transfer rollers 23, 24, 25 shunt the remaining windings into the adjacent grooves until the tail end 19 of the rope is discharged from the drum and out of engagement with the last groove 16.

The action of the above noted transfer rollers has been described with reference to rotation of the drum 10 in a counterclockwise direction as seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 so that the load carried by the housing 1 is raised along the length of the tension end 18 of the rope. An additional transfer .roller 26 is provided which is inoperative when the hoist is going up, but becomes operative when the hoist is being lowered. In this latter case transfer roller 26 functions to shunt the rope from groove 16 into groove 15 and rollers 25, 24, 23 and 22 actto shunt the rope from groove to groove until the last groove 11 is reached and the rope is discharged as tension end 18. When the hoist is thus operated to lower the load transfer roller 21 becomes inoperative.

Transfer roller 22 and the mounting thereof is shown in detail in FIG. 8 and the roller comprises a generally cylindrical body portion 30 which is provided at its opposite ends with sleeve bearings 31 for rotatably supporting the roller structure on a fixed shaft 32 extending between opposite side plates 6,7 of the hoist houswell into the associated groove 12 of the drum thereby permitting a smooth shunting action of the rope.

Surrounding the body portion 30 of the roller 22 is a shell'37 preferably formed of a tough resilient plastic material such as polyurethane. As will be seen later on this shell .37 is contoured to provide annular grooves cooperating with the rope in a manner to be described. The opposite ends of the roller 22 are diametrically enlarged and formed to provide a pair of generally axially directed frustoconical surfaces 38,39 which are adapted to cooperate respectively with complementary formed enlarged ends 40,41 ofdrum 10;

The body portion 30 of roller 22 is preferably formed of steel and the opposite ends 38,39, engaging the ends 40,41 of steel drum 10, act to position the transfer roller in a predetermined position axially relative to the drum thereby properly positioning the wire windings. A

slight axialshifting of roller 22 is permitted to conform to the inherent t'endencyof the rope windings to walk axially along the length of the drum due to the helical form of the windings; Depending upon the I direction of rotation of the drum the roller 22 is urged against one or the other of the ends 40,41 of the drum providing a substantially positive positioning of the windings. By this structure it will be apparent that no thrust from the windings is transferred to the side plates 6,7 of the housing but is absorbed by the drum l0.

The remaining transfer rollers are identical in structure and mounting to the above described roller 22 except that, as seen in FIGS. 4, and 6, the annular projection 35 is in a different position for each roller as indicated since said projections cooperate with different grooves of the drum 10.

Atspaced points around the periphery of the drum l0 and interposed between each pair of adjacent transfer rollers are a plurality of tension rollers which are spring urged radially inwardly of the drum in order to enhance the frictional engagementbetween the rope and the periphery of the drum. In additionto the tension rollers interposed between pairs of transfer rollers and numbered 43 to 47, additional similar tension rollers 48,49,50'are also provided, it being understood that the greater number of tension rollers the greater will be the traction developed between the rope and the drum periphery. The required pressure in the rope is thus reduced and reeving made easier.

In FIG. 7 tension roller 43 is shown in detail and it is seen that the same is provided with an inner cylindrical portion 53 to the opposite ends of which are secured sleeve bearings/S4 rotatably supported on shaft 56. The opposite ends of shaft 56 are mounted in blocks 57,58 slidably supported for movementradially of the drum in grooves 59,60 formed in side plates 6,7 of the housing 1. The blocks 57,58 are urged radially inwardly of the drum 10 at all times by means of compression springs 62.

Mounted on the sleeve 53 of roller 43 is a shell 64 also preferably formed of polyurethane plastic and peripherally formed to cooperate with the rope windings in a manner to be described. The remaining tension rollers are similar to roller 43 in construction and mounting" except that their peripheries are appropriately formed depending upon the location of the tension rollers relative to'the rope windings. As in the case of the transfer rollers the tension rollers are similarly formed with frustoconical ends 66,67 adapted to cooperate with the complementarily formed end portions 40,41 of the drum 10. As can beseen in FIG. 7 the steel drum 10 is driving the polyurethane tension roller 43 by frictional engagement with the left hand end of the latter. As will beseen later on, upon reversal of the direction of rotation of the drum tension roller 43 is shifted to the right in FIG. 7 so that the roller is driven through engagement of the drum with its right hand end.

in FIGS. 2, 5 and 6B the engagement between rope and the transfer rollers is shown for the condition in which the drum 10 is rotating-in a counterclockwise direction as seenin FIG. 1 and the rope is moving rela: tive to the housing in a direction from right to left in FIGS. 5 and 6B- When the direction of rotation is reversed andthe rope is driven relative to the housing from left to right as seen in FIG. 6A the opposite sides of transfer rollers 22, 23, 24 and 25 become active and transfer roller 26 functions to shunt the rope from groove 16 to groove 15 but in such an event transfer roller 21 becomes inoperative. This action can best be seen with reference to FIG. 5. l

. Also with reference to FIGS. 5, 6A and'6B it is seen that the shunted portions of the rope'between adjacent transfer rollers change their positions depending upon the directionof rotation of the drum 10. This change of position of the juncture between adjacent windings and the actual shifting of the rope windings within their grooves is employed to shift the tension rollers axially of their supporting shafts so that the rollers are driven by different sides of the drum 10. In this manner the direction of movement of the rope engaging portions of the rollers relative to the adjacent rope windings is the same as the direction of movement of the drum periphery. For this reason power loss by friction between the rope and the rollers is considerably reduced. Furthermore from a consideration of FIG. 7 it will be seen that the linear speed of the rollers at their points of engagement with the rope is slightly greater than the speed of the rope itself so that the rollers actually tend to urge the rope forward in whatever direction the latter is traveling. This urging of the rope forwardly is resilient in nature since the drive between the drum and the rollers relies on friction. Excessive wear on the rollers by the rope is therefore avoided.

Because of the fact that the windings and the junctures between adjacent windings of the rope 20 shift depending upon the direction of rotation of the drum the peripheral grooves in the tension rollers are appropriately formed to permit continuous frictional engagement with the rope. For example in FIG. 7 the relatively wide groove 69 that receives the rope 20 is of sufficient width to permit the shifting of the associated rope juncture depending upon the rotation of the latter. The minimum diameter of groove 69 is also less than the minimum diameter of the remaining grooves since the rope 20 is displaced radially outwardly between adjacent grooves. This same method of forming the the shell 37 in FIG. 8.

One of the most important features of the present invention is the arrangement of transfer rollers and tension rollers as above described which results in the guided by the tension rollers and transfer rollers until it reaches transfer roller 21 which shunts it into adjacent groove 12 where it is immediately gripped by tension.

roller 50 and passed through short guide 72 into the control of tension roller 49 and so on. After all of the windings have been formed the rope is then discharged out the tail end through a guide 73. It will be apparent that this self-reeving feature is realized whether the' rope is fed into the upper end or into the lower end of the housing. Since it is never necessary for the operator to open the housing it is impossible for him to make any mistake of judgment that would adversely affect'the operation of the hoist and effective traction between the rope and the drum is established at all times making undue slipping impossible.

In the particular application of the hoist shown in FIGS. 1,3 wherein rope end 18 is always the loaded end and tail end 19 is always slack the wear between the rope and drum may be reduced and the traction enhanced by forming the grooves receiving the windings having the greatest tension to a larger diameter than the remaining windings. For example in a drum having a nominal diameter of 8 inches groove 11 may be, for example, 0.0l4 inch greater in diameter than groove 12 and the latter is 0.006 inch greater in diameter than groove 13. Since the last three grooves 14-16 are under comparatively little tension they may be of equal diameter. This graduation in groove diameter-appropriately adjusts for the fact that the stretch in the rope adjacent the loaded end 18 is greater than adjacent the slack end. Thus wear is reduced and traction improved because the length of each winding, having regard for the tension therein, closely conforms to the peripheral extent of its respective groove. It will be apparent that the above described graduation of groove diameters is not appropriate if either end of the rope may become loaded.

The performance of the hoist of FIGS. 1,3 may be enhanced by forming the frustoconical end portion 66 to a slightly smaller effective diameter than the opposite end 67. Referring to FIG. 7 it is seen that, as the hoist is raising the load, the tension roller 43 is being driven by the left hand end 40 of the drum and the tail end of the rope is urged out of groove 16 by roller 43 which, acting at a greater radius on drum has a greater peripheral speed than the drum. On the other hand when the drum rotation is reversed frustoconical end 67 acting at a smaller radius on shoulder 41 provides a slight drag with respect to the unloaded end. The result of this structure is that the windings are more effectively urged against the grooves and traction is improved. I

The hoisting arrangement of FIGS. 1,3 is appropriate for use in raising and lowering scaffolding, however the invention is not restricted to such an arrangement. For example in FIG. 9 there is shown schematically a hoisting arrangement wherein the hoist housing 1' is fixed to an elevated structure and the rope ends 18, 19' are run over sheaves 80,81 and are connected to cages 82,83 respectively. In this arrangement the cages 82,83 may be simultaneously loaded and unloaded or one load may be employed as a counterweight to permit raising the other with twice the load for a given horsepower than if no counterweight were present.

The present invention lends itself to this last mentioned application because of the fact that the tension rollers and shunt rollers are provided at spaced points around the entire periphery of the drum so that adequate traction is provided at all times regardless of the direction of drum rotation and regardless of the" tension differential in the rope ends. As stated above a drum having graduated groove diameters is not used in an arrangementsuch as shown in FIG. 9.

Not only does the use of transfer rollers as distinguished from fixed guides reduce the wear and loss of power but it also prevents excessive wear and damage to the rope.

' It has been found that better traction is achieved between the rope and drum of hoists of this character when a maximum number of relatively light radially inthe recesses so that a portion of the inner side of the rope is in engagement with said plastic. (See FIGS. 7,8).

The provision of the plastic 78 results in a reduction of the effective area of engagement between the rope and the hard metal of the groove thus increasing the unit pressure. The plastic 78 also keeps foreign matter out of the bottom of the groove and improves the reeving action.

It will be understood that in order to achieve the above described self-reeving feature it is desirable that the end of the rope which is inserted into the hoist be as straight as possible so as to minimize any tendency of the rope to be deflected out of the control of the transfer rollers and tension rollers. This problem is of course aggravated if the peripheral spacing between the rolls is increased.

In FIG. 1 a tubular guide is shown to direct the end of rope 18 to short guide 72 and tension roller 49. An alternative arrangement is illustrated in FIG. 10 wherein the rope. 18 is inserted into the housing 1 through a tubular guide 86 formed with an enlarged diameter section 87. This section 87 connects at its lower end with a flared portion 88 which in turn connects with a continuation 89 of guide 86.

The lower end of enlarged section 87 thus provides an annular shoulder 90 which engages and acts as an abutment stop for the end of the wire in the event the terminal portion of the wire deviates from a straight line beyond a predetermined limit. For example, the terminal portion schematically indicated by dot dash proper selforeeving past the. various rollers unlikely.

The operator cannot insert said terminal portion 18 through the enlarged Section and is obliged to withdraw the wire and straighten the same to a sufficient degree of straightness that the end of the wire passes the shoulder 90. in FIG. 10 a slightly bent wire indicated by dotted lines at 18" straightness to pass the annular shoulder 90 and therefore pass the various rollers to insure the self-reeving feature.

-It will be apparent that the length of enlarged section 87 and the inside diameter'of. annular shoulder 90 may be varied to test the straightness of the wire so that any predetermined degree of straightness may be achieved. 4

ln FlGS. 11, 12 there is illustrated a modified form of the invention whichmay be employed to enhance the self-reeving action in the ,event'the wire rope. is not straight or the rope is frayed or otherwise damaged and includes loose strands of wire. ln this connection it will be understood that the use of a damaged wire rope increasesthe likelihood that one or more loose strands may enter the'small space-between the outer periphery of one of the transfer rollers and its associated groove on the drum. If this in fact occurs the coaction between the transfer roller and the drum could pull the remainder of the rope into said small space thus causing additional damage to the wire rope. Naturally it is not good practice to employ wire rope that is not in good condition but in the interest of safety it is desirable to take all possible precautions against'improper usage.

ln FIGS. 11, 12 that portion of the drum 10 that cooperates with transfer rollers 23, 24, is shown together with tension rollers 45; 46JThis embodiment of the invention includes a fixed guide 92 positioned on each side of each transfer roller. Each guide is carried by a shaft 93 which is fixedly secured at its opposite ends in side plates 6, 7. it will be seen in FIG. 11 that guides 92 may be made from relatively thin plate and are secured to their supporting shafts 93 at an angle so that they are coplanar with the central plane of the associated transfer roller.

Further with reference to FIG. 11 it is seen that the guides 92 associated with transferroller 24 serve to constrain the rope between the adjacent tension roller and the transfer roller. For example, while. the rope is being reeved on the drum and traveling from right to left as seen in FIG. 11 the rope end coming from the tension roller 46 strikes the guide 92 between said tension roller 46 and transfer roller 24 and is directed to the working side of the latter. In this manner the shunting of the rope into the influence of tension roller 45 is made more smoothly. More importantly, if the rope is frayed and includes loose strands there is very little liklihood that such loose strands will enter the small approaches from the left, then the fixed guide 92 on the left side of roller 24 deflects the rope to the working side of roller 24. This action of the rope is indicated by dotted linesin FlG. 1 1. Thus by providing a fixed guide has a sufficient degree of 7 on each side of each transfer roller the hoist is guarded against failure by the use of damaged wire regardless of the direction of rotation of the drum.

The inner edge of each guide 92 may be positioned closely adjacent the periphery of the drum and, as shown in FIG. 12, the extent of each guide may be increased toward 'the drum to provide substantially complete restraint of the wire at all times.

It will be understood that some variation in the particular location of the shunting rollers may be made over that shown in FIG. 1. It will be understood that it is preferable to permit the first winding-from tension end 18 to substantially encircle the drum before said first winding is shunted from groove. 11' to groove 12 (F l6. 7). In this manner traction is improved since an optimum length of contact between the tensioned end of the rope and the drum results. Similarly the second winding should be as long as possible before it is shunted .into the third groove and so one. For this reason shunt roller 21 could be moved closer to the tensioned end 18 of theropeand, in fact, could be interchanged with tension roller 50. ln a similar manner.

shunt roller 26 could be interchanged with tension roller 48. The, arrangement thus resulting would be similar to that shown in pending application Ser. No. 69,710 filed Sept. 4, 1970. a

l-lowever it will be apparent that the first winding, as disclosed herein,fand subsequent windings engage the drum along substantially the entire periphery of the latter before being shunted to the next groove.

I claim:

l. A hoisting device comprising:

ahousing, I

a drum rotatably mounted in said housing, said drum being formed with a plurality of axially spaced parallel grooves in planes perpendicular to the axis of said drum, I

a rope formed intermediate its ends to provide a plurality of windings respectively received in said grooves and junctures connecting adjacent windings,

means for deflecting said rope from one winding to an adjacent winding during rotation of said drum with the deflected portions of said rope forming said junctures in engagement with the periphery of said drum, I

said deflecting means comprising a roller free for axial movement and rotatably supported in said housing and in engagement with a winding of said rope at one side of the latter,

said drum being formed at one of its opposite ends with an annular coaxial abutment and said roller being formed with an annular abutment adapted to engage said drum at said drum abutment to limit movement of said roller axially relative to said drum.

2. A device according to claim 1 wherein said drum is formed with a coaxial abutment at each end and said roller is rotatably supported on a shaft carried by said housing and is adapted to shift axially on said shaft into engagement with one or the other of the abutments on said drum.

3. A device according to claim 1 wherein said roller is provided with a peripherally extending groove in registration with an adjacent undefiected winding therein.

4. A hoisting device comprising:

a housing,

a drum rotatably mounted in said housing,

said drum being formed with a plurality of axially spaced parallel grooves in planes perpendicular to the axis of said drum,

a rope formed intermediate its ends to provide a plurality of windings respectively received in said grooves and junctures connecting adjacent windings,

means for deflecting said rope from one winding to an adjacent winding during rotation of said drum with the deflected portions of said rope forming said junctures in engagement with the periphery of said drum,

a tension roller free for axial movement and supported for rotation relative to said housing,

means urging said roller radially inwardly of said drum, i

said roller being provided with a plurality of peripherally extending grooves adapted to receive said rope windings therein for reducing the pressure on said rope,

said drum being formed at one of its opposite ends with an annular coaxial abutment and said tension roller being formed with an annular abutment adapted to engage said drum abutment to limit movement of said roller axially relative to said drum. I

5. A device according to claim 4 wherein said tension roller is supported for axial movement to permit shifting of said roller by said rope windings. i

6. A device according to claim 4 wherein said drum is formed at each of its opposite ends with an axially inwardly directed coaxial shoulder and said roller is supported for slidable axial movement into engagement with one or the other of said shoulders.

7. A hoisting device incorporating automatic reeving wherein a wire rope is reeved around a drum in a plurality of windings and means is provided for leading the free end of such rope circumferentially around said drum to so form said windings without manual intervention, said device comprising:

a housing,

a drum rotatably mounted on said housing,

a rope formed intermediate its ends to provide a plurality of parallel windings in planes at right angles to the axis of said drum,

means for holding said windings against axial shifting relative to said drum, I

shunt rollers for deflecting said rope from one winding to an adjacent winding during rotation of said drum with the deflected portions of said rope in engagement with the periphery of said drum,

a plurality of tension rollers arranged in a circular row around the entire periphery of said drum, and

means for urging said tension rollers radially inwardly of said drum and against said windings to increase the traction ofthe latter relative to said drum,

adjacent of said shunt and tension rollers being spaced sufficiently close together that the end of a semi-rigid rope being reeved around the drum and extending tangentially from said drum under one roller is deflected radially inwardly toward the drum by an adjacent roller to allow such automatic reeving. 8. A device according to cla1m'7 wherein a shunt roller is interposed between at least one pair of adjacent tension rollers.

9. A hoisting device comprising:

a housing,

a drum rotatably mounted in said housing,

said drum being formed with a plurality of axially spaced parallel grooves in planes perpendicular to the axis of said drum,

a rope forward intermediate its ends to provide a plurality of windings respectively received in said grooves and junctures connected adjacent windings,

means for deflecting said rope from one winding to an adjacent windingduring rotation of said drum with the deflected portions of said rope forming said junctures in engagement with the periphery of said drum,

said rope having 'a loaded end and a slack end whereby the tension in said rope decreases along the lengths of said windings toward said slack end,

said groove being formed to a larger diameter at said loaded end than at said slack end to reduce the relative movement between rope and drum and to improve traction and decrease wear,

the difference in diameter between the loaded and slack ends of the drum being in the orderof the difference in lengths of the windings at said ends due to elongation of the rope at said loaded end.

10. A hoisting device comprising:

a housing,

a drum rotatably mounted in said housing,

said drum being formed with a plurality of axially spaced parallel grooves in planes perpendicular to the axis of said drum,

a rope formed intermediate its ends to provide a plurality of windings respectively received in said grooves and junctures connecting adjacent windings,

shunt rollers for deflecting said rope from one winding to an adjacent winding during rotation of said drum with the deflected portions of said rope forming said junctures in engagement with the periphery of said drum,

each of said rollers being rotatably supported in said housing and each being positioned with its axis of rotation substantially parallel to the periphery of said drum and spaced apart peripherally of said drum from an adjacent roller.

11. A device according to claim 10 wherein said rollers are spaced apart around the entire periphery of said drum.

12. A device according to claim 10 wherein each of

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US772074 *Nov 25, 1902Oct 11, 1904Edward S IshamElevator.
US2917279 *Nov 13, 1956Dec 15, 1959Carter H ArnoldHoisting device
US2922623 *Nov 14, 1955Jan 26, 1960Horace B SimmonsHoists
US2976017 *Jul 7, 1958Mar 21, 1961Le Bus Royalty CompanyPressure bar for cable spooling drums
US3226090 *Jun 18, 1963Dec 28, 1965Aircraft Armaments IncMaterials handling arrangement
US3353793 *Jul 1, 1966Nov 21, 1967North American Aviation IncCable retainer
*DE13325C Title not available
DE956441C *Apr 2, 1955Jan 17, 1957Stahl R MaschinenfabrikSeilwicklungsvorrichtungen fuer Seiltrommeln
GB656661A * Title not available
SE112967A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5186283 *Sep 26, 1991Feb 16, 1993Otis Elevator CompanyTriple-wrap traction arrangement
US7261278Mar 15, 2006Aug 28, 2007Atlas Devices, LlcPowered rope ascender and portable rope pulling device
US7475521 *May 23, 2006Jan 13, 2009Poly-Clip System Gmbh & Co. KgClip reel and system for unwinding a clip reel
US7581715Jul 20, 2007Sep 1, 2009Atlas Devices, LlcPowered rope ascender and portable rope pulling device
US7934698Feb 26, 2008May 3, 2011Atlas Devices, LlcPowered rope ascender and portable rope pulling device
US8702067 *Aug 22, 2008Apr 22, 2014Heerema Marine Contractors Nederland SeAxial displacement device, line deployment system, and a method for deploying a line
US20110108786 *Aug 22, 2008May 12, 2011Heerema Marine Contractors Nederland B.V.Axial displacement device, line deployment system, and a method for deploying a line
US20140061557 *Sep 3, 2013Mar 6, 2014Soletanche FreyssinetTraction system using a multi-tendon cable with a deflection angle
WO2009028932A1 *Aug 22, 2008Mar 5, 2009Heerema Marine Contractors NlAxial displacement device, line deployment system, and a method for deploying a line
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/157.00R, 254/DIG.110, 242/602.2
International ClassificationB66D1/74
Cooperative ClassificationB66D2700/0191, B66D1/7447, Y10S254/11
European ClassificationB66D1/74H2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 7, 1989ASAssignment
Owner name: FIDELCOR BUSINESS CREDIT CORPORATION, FLORIDA
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SKY CLIMBER, INC., A CORP OF WA;REEL/FRAME:005217/0173
Effective date: 19891130
Dec 7, 1989AS06Security interest
Owner name: FIDELCOR BUSINESS CREDIT CORPORATION, 5900 NORTH A
Owner name: SKY CLIMBER, INC., A CORP OF WA
Effective date: 19891130
Jan 8, 1987AS06Security interest
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., SUITE 200,
Effective date: 19861224
Owner name: SKY CLIMBER, INC., A CORP. OF WA.
Jan 8, 1987ASAssignment
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., SUITE 200,
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SKY CLIMBER, INC., A CORP. OF WA.;REEL/FRAME:004651/0138
Effective date: 19861224
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC.,NORTH CAROL
Free format text: SECURITY INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SKY CLIMBER, INC., A CORP. OF WA.;REEL/FRAME:4651/138
Owner name: BARCLAYSAMERICAN/BUSINESS CREDIT, INC., NORTH CARO