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Publication numberUS3708218 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1973
Filing dateDec 3, 1970
Priority dateDec 3, 1970
Publication numberUS 3708218 A, US 3708218A, US-A-3708218, US3708218 A, US3708218A
InventorsC Smillie
Original AssigneeC Smillie
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water heated mirror for condensation control
US 3708218 A
Abstract
The water heated mirror includes a shell and a glass mirror panel which define a conduit type chamber on the reverse surface of the mirror panel in heat exchange relationship therewith through which hot water flows to elevate the temperature of the glass panel and prevent condensation of moisture on the reflecting surface thereof. The side and bottom end walls of the shell are provided with drain openings for the gravity drainage of spent water from the interior of the chamber.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [1 1 Smillie, 1n

[111 3,708,218 I 1 Jan.2,1973

[54] WATER HEATED MIRROR FOR CONDENSATION CONTROL [76] Inventor: Charles M. Smlllie, 111, 4220 herness, Orchard Lake, Mich. 48033 221 Filedz Dec. 3, 1910 211 Appl.No.: 94,730

Related US. Application Data [62] Division of Ser. No. 812,155, April 1, 1969, Pat. No.

[52] US. Cl. ..350/6l, 4/146, 165/47,

165/168, 248/467, 350/3, 350/310 51 Int. Cl. ..G02b

[58]' Field of Search ..350/61, 3, 310; 165/47, 168,

[56] References Cited 7 UNITED STATES PATENTS 3,530,275 9/1970 Rust ..350/6l UX 1,843,828 2/1932 McNaught ..350/61 X 1,482,313 1/1924 Miethe ..350/3 3,305,202 2/1967 Christensen... ."248/467 3,377,117 4/1968 Biscow ..248/467 X 2,722,160 11/1955 Prutzman ..350/61 3 ,46 1 ,8 70 8/1969 Van Linge ..4/145 X 3,373,448 3/1968 Butler ..350/61 UX Primary Examiner-David Schonberg Assistant Examiner-Toby l-l. Kusmer I Attorney-Whittemore, l-lulbert & Belknap [5 7] ABSTRACT The water heated mirror includes ashell and a glass mirror panel which define a conduit type chamber on the reverse surface of the mirror panel in heat exchange relationship therewith through which hot water flows to elevate the temperature of the glass panel and prevent condensation of moisture on the reflecting surface thereof. The side and bottom end walls of the-shell are provided with drain openings for the gravity drainage of spent water from the interior of the chamber.

6 Claims, 13 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJAM 2:915

SHEET 2 UF 2 ATQRNEYS CHARLES M. SMILLIE,]II

WATER HEATED MIRROR FOR CONDENSATION CONTROL CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION This application is a division of my copending US. application entitled Water Heated Mirror, Ser. No. 812,155, filed on Apr. 1, 1969, now U.S. Pat. No. 3,594,063.

BACKGROUNDOF THE INVENTION Minors are frequently provided in bathrooms and shower areas for use in shaving, combing the hair, and the like. When a person takes a hot shower or a hot bath, steam generated from the hot water used for bathing or showering causes moisture to condense on the reflecting surface of the mirror, thus making the mirror unusable for its usual purpose.

The present invention provides a means for flowing hot water through conduit structure provided on the reverse side of the glass mirror panel in heat exchange relationship therewith. The flow of hot water causes the glass panel to become warm and thus prevents the condensation of moisture on the reflecting surface, it being appreciated that moisture will not condense on a sur face which isat an elevated temperature. Several different structures are provided in accordance with the present invention for accomplishing the purpose. The mirror assembly thus provided may easily be integrated into the existing conduit means provided in bathrooms. A fitting is disclosed which permits ready installation of the water inlet of the mirror to existing shower heads. The mirror assembly is relatively inexpensive and does not require extensive modification of the bathroom plumbing for installation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The water heated mirror comprises a shell having a back wall with upstanding side and end walls. A glass mirror panel is glazed on the outer marginal edges of the upstanding walls of the shell to define an interior conduit type chamber for the flow of hot water on the reverse surface of the glass mirror panel. Hot water inlet means are provided for said conduit chamber. Drain openings are providedin the side and bottom end walls of the shell for drainage of spent water from the chamber.

IN THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of one embodiment of the water heated mirror of the present invention illustratively mounted in a shower stall.

FIG. 2 is a front elevational view of the mirror of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a view in section taken substantially along the line 3-3 of FIG. 2 looking in the direction of the FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 88 of FIG. 7 looking in the direction of the p arrows and pivoted in the clockwise direction;

FIG. 9 is a view in perspective of a further embodiment of the water heated mirror;

FIG. 10 is a sectional view taken substantially along FIG. 13 is a sectional view illustrating magnet means I for attaching the mirror to a support structure;

Referring first to the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 1-6, it will be noted that the water heated mirror 10 is mounted on the wall 12 of a shower stall beneath the shower head 14. The mirror is of relatively large size to result in a full view of the upper portion of a persons body. The mirror is mounted at approximately eye level so that it may beused for shaving, combing of the hair, and the like.

The mirror assembly comprises a glass plate 16 hav ing the usual silvering thereon for reflecting purposes. The plate 16 is mounted in a generally rectangular frame 18. The frame 18 comprises top and bottom elements 20, 22 and side elements 24, 26. The ends of these elements are mitredso that they will fit together in the desired rectangular shape.

The cross-sectionalconfiguration of the frame elements is best illustrated in FIG. 5. As. will be there noted, each frame element comprises a side wall 28 and a front wall 30 which extends at right angles thereto. A first flange 32 extends from the inner surface of the side wall 28 parallel to the front wall 30 and spaced rearwardly therefrom to define a channel for receiving an edge portion of the glass plate 16. The plate 16 isglazed into the channel by use of a suitable glazing material to firmly hold the glass in place and result in a fluid-tight joint. g

A second flange 34 extends'frorn the inner surface of the side wall 28 parallel to the first flange 32 and spaced rearwardly therefrom to define a centralchannel 36. The flange 34 and rear portion of the side wall 28 define an L-shaped recess. A rectangular panel 40 is received in this recess to form the back wall of the-mirror unit. The panel 40 is illustratively fabricated of a water-proof fibrous material. However, other materials such asmetal or plastic may be usedto fabricate the panel 40. The panel 40 is secured in place by means of a suitable adhesive to resultin the entire unit being fluid-tight.

The mirror assembly thus far described defines a central space 42 which is utilized to receive a. sinuous tubular coil 44. The coil 44 is formed in a sinuous pattern having downwardly directed tubular portions 46 and upwardly directed portions 48-interconnected by two bends 50, 52. The coil 44 is of a size to substantially occupy the space 42 both vertically and horizontally to thereby substantially cover the glass'plate 16. The coil 44 is placed in intimate, heat-exchange con tact with the inner surface 54 of the glass plate 16. This may be accomplished by use of a suitable adhesive. The

coil 44 may be fabricated of a metal such as copper or it may be fabricatedof a plastic material.

A portion 56 of the first downwardly extending coil section 46 extends upwardly through an opening in the top frame r'nember and forms the water inlet to the coil. Asimilar portion 58 of the last downwardly extending coil section 46 extends through an opening in the lower frame member 22 to form the water outlet. A flexible tube 60 connects the inlet 56 with a tubular extension 62 of afltting 64. As best-seen in FIG. 6, the fitting 64 comprises a section of pipe having one end 66 externally threaded with the other end 68 being internally threaded; The tubular extension 62 communicates with the interior of the fitting and bypasses part of the water which flows through the fitting. The externally threaded end 66 is threadingly received in the water outlet fitting 70. The internally threaded end 68 tural reinforcements for the unit. The vanes extend between the glass mirror panel 80 and back wall 81 of the shell 78 to thus reinforce these walls. The side walls I of the unit are similarlyreinforced by the connection of threadingly receives the'shower head 14. The fitting 64v 1 permits integration of the mirror 10 with a standard showerhead arrangement without the need for extensive modification of the shower head. A flexible drain tube 74 extends downwardly from the outlet 58 for the passage of water from the unit onto the shower floor for flushing through the-usual drain provided therein. v

In operationof the water heated mirror 10, hot water is caused to 'flow through the coil 44' whenever the shower is turned on. The hot water flowing through the coil 44 causes the glass panel 16 to become heated, thus preventing condensation ,of moisture thereon. Consequently, the mirror will remain clear even though the shower areamay become steamy. FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate another embodiment of waterheated mirror 76. The mirror 76 comprises a generally rectangular shell 78 in which is mounted a glass mirror panel 80. The shell 78 is illustratively fabricated of metal. However, the shell may be inexpensively formed of plastic by the vacuum molding process. The shell 78 comprises aback wall 81 having upstanding side walls 82. An L-shaped flange 84 is provided on the outer edges of the side walls82 to define a recess to receive the glass mirror panel 80. The panel '80 is glazed into the shell by use of a suitable adhesive to make the juncture of the panel and shell fluid-tight. A tubular 'inlet86 is provided in'the upper wall of the shell for connectionfto the hot water as described in connection 'withFlG. l. A tubular outlet 88 is provided in the lower wall ofv the shell for drainage of water from the unit as previously described. a

A plurality of 1 laterally and downwardly extending the vanes thereto.

FIGS. 9-11 illustrate another embodiment of a water heated mirror 96. The mirror 96 comprises a shell 98 in which the glass mirror panel 100 is glazed. The shell .98 comprises a back wall 102 having upstanding side walls 104, 106, top wall 108 and bottom wall 110. A notch 112 is provided in the top wall 108. An opening 114 in.

the notch receives a tubular inlet member 1 16 which is connected to the source of hot water (not shown). A

peripheral flange 118 extends'entirely around the shell 98 outwardly from the outer edges of the walls 104,

106, 108, 110. The glass mirror 100 has a sheet 120 of plastic material adhered to the rear surface thereof. The sheet 120 in turn is adhered to the surface of the flange 118 in fluid-tight relationship to result in the interior of the assembly being fluid-tight. The sheet 120 serves to insulate the glass from direct contact with the hot water. Additionally, the sheet 120 may be selected for easy adherence toboth glass and metal, the shell 98 being illustratively fabricated of metal. g

A U-shaped molding strip l22.fabricated of plastic is provided around the marginal edge of the mirror assembly. The strip 122 has flexible side walls withintumed lip portions 124, 126 to securely grip the flange 118 and'themarginal edge of the glass mirror panel 100. The molding strip 122 is decorative and, additionally, tends to prevent the ingress of moisture which would have a deteriorating effect upon the glazed edge portion of the shell 98, glass mirror panelQl00, and plastic sheet 120. g l

A plurality of cylindrical recesses 1 28 are provided shell 98 and glass mirror panel 100. The water, which is vanes 90, 92 are provided within the shell 78 to define a tortuous path for the flow of hot water through the unit.

The vanes 90 extend from the left-hand side of the unit as viewed in FIG. 7downwardly towards the right-hand wall to provide an opening for the passage of water. The vanes 92'extend from right. to left as viewed in FIG. 7 and also terminate short of the opposite side wall to provide for anopening for the passage of water. As illustrated by the dotted arrows 94, water flows from the inlet 86 to the right and then passes downwardly and then flows from right to left. The water is in direct contact with the glass panel 80 and thus heatsthis panel to prevent condensation of :moisture thereon. The water finally drains through the outlet 88. The vanes 90, 92 in addition to' guiding thewater flow, also serve as strucman elevatedtemperature, floods the space 134 and thus heats'the glass mirror panel to prevent the condensation of. moisture on "the exterior surface thereof. I 1

Means are providedto constantly drain the spent water from the space 134. A plurality of spaced apart notches 136', 138 are provided in each of the side walls 104, 106. As will be noted in FIG. 10, the notches are substantially V-shaped. An opening 140 is provided in the upper wall portion 142 for the drainage of water as illustrated by the solid arrows 144. Water thus constantlydrains from the sides of the mirror unit. The

lower wall portion 146 of the notches is angled downwardly to assist in the gravity flow of the water.

Additional spaced apart openings 148 are provided in i drainage openings 140, 148 cause the water to flow uniformly within chamber 134.

Four spaced apart suction cups 152, illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 12, are provided for securement of the mirror unit 96 to a supporting wall surface. The suctioncups 152 are held in place by means of screws 154 which extend through openings in the back wall 102 into threaded engagement with enlarged portions 156 of the suction cups. The mirror unit may thus be applied to virtually any wall surface by merely pressing the suction cups into engagement therewith.

FIG. 13 illustrates an alternate means for mounting of the mirror 96. As illustrated in FIG. 13, elongated permanent magnets 158, 160 are secured in the elongated recesses 130, 132 of the back wall 102. The magnets may be secured in place by means of a suitable adhesive. In mounting of the mirror unit, the unit is merely pressed against the supporting wall surface whereupon the magnets 158, 160 will hold the mirror in place. It is, of course, necessary to have a wall surface which is metallic in nature or which has a metallic portion thereon as, for example, the metallic trim frequently provided in modern bathroom designs.

What] claim as my invention is:

1. An indoor water heated mirror for use in steamy bath areas comprising a shell having a back wall with upstanding side walls andtop and bottom end walls, a glass mirror panel glazed to the outer marginal edges of said side and end walls in fluid-tight engagement therewith to define an interior fluid-tight chamber, said mirror panel and said shell defining a water conduit means for the flow of hot water on the reverse surface of said panel in heat exchange relationship with the panel to heat the panel and prevent steam from condensing thereon, hot water inlet means in the top wall of said shell, said side and bottom end walls having drain openings therein for the gravity drainage of spent water from the interior of said chamber, said drain openings causing the water to flow uniformly within the chamber wherein structure is provided within said chamber defining a flow path for hot water to cause flow of water within the chamber in paths to pass substantially uniformly over the reverse surface of said glass mirror in heat exchange relationship therewith.

2. The indoor water heated mirror as defined in claim 1 and further characterized in that the side walls of said shell are each provided with a plurality of spaced apart inwardly directed notches -having a generally V-shape with upper and lower wall portions, the upper wall portions having said openings formed therein, said lower wall portions defining a downwardly inclined slope for the gravity flow of water from the mirror after the 'water drains through the openings.

3. The indoor water heated mirror as defined in claim 2 and further characterized in the provision of a plurality of spaced apart recesses in said back wall extending into contact with the reverse side of said glass mirror panel to structurally rigidify the mirror assembly and to define flow paths for water through said interior fluid-tight chamber.

4. The indoor water heated mirror as defined in claim 1 and further characterized in the provision of a sheet of plastic material secured to the reverse surface of said mirror panel to insulate said panel from the hot water flowing through said interior chamber, said sheet of plastic material extending between the glass mirror panel and the outer marginal edges of said side and end walls to thereby glaze the glass'mirror panel to the outer marginal edges of the side and end walls in said fluid-tight engagement.

5. The indoor water heated mirror as defined in claim 1 wherein said structure within said chamber comprises a plurality of cylindrical recesses struck out of the back wall of said shell and extending towards and engaging said mirror panel.

6. The indoor water heated mirror as defined in claim 1 wherein said structure comprises a plurality of elongated recesses struck out of the back wall of said shell and extending towards and engaging said mirror panel. I

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1482313 *May 12, 1923Jan 29, 1924Miethe AdolfReplector
US1843828 *Mar 3, 1930Feb 2, 1932Peter Mcnaught RobertMeans for keeping windows, windshields, etc., clear of moisture
US2722160 *Jan 12, 1952Nov 1, 1955Prutzman Paul ERear view truck mirror
US3305202 *Jul 30, 1963Feb 21, 1967Christenson Melvin AExternal hood-mounted rear view mirrors for automobiles
US3373448 *Jul 27, 1965Mar 19, 1968Doyle Butler OttoShower-shaver
US3377117 *Oct 28, 1963Apr 9, 1968Edgar B. BiscowRear view mirror assembly including a sleeve having an internal spring to restore the reflector to a given position
US3461870 *Mar 6, 1967Aug 19, 1969Linge Cornelius VanDouche attachment for connection with a shower having antisiphon and pressure control means
US3530275 *Oct 31, 1968Sep 22, 1970Rust Duyane JCondensation control for mirrors
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3985429 *Feb 6, 1975Oct 12, 1976Donnelly Mirrors, Inc.Strengthened, shatter-resistant vehicular mirror
US3986769 *Dec 6, 1974Oct 19, 1976Research CorporationVapor density dependent optical filter
US4076374 *Jul 14, 1976Feb 28, 1978Schwab Robert EMeans for maintaining visibility in the use of mirrors subject to aqueous deposits
US4150869 *Nov 3, 1977Apr 24, 1979Hansen Robert BCondensate-proof mirror
US4529278 *Aug 9, 1983Jul 16, 1985Nugent Robert TPortable children's mirror
US4556298 *Jul 13, 1984Dec 3, 1985Gottlieb Robert GNon-fogging bathroom mirror
US4557003 *Apr 22, 1985Dec 10, 1985Jones Thomas LShower mirror apparatus
US4558929 *Jan 26, 1984Dec 17, 1985Stephens John AFor use in a shower
US4832475 *Jan 25, 1988May 23, 1989Daniels John JNon-fogging shower mirror
US4836668 *Dec 4, 1987Jun 6, 1989Shower Tek, Inc.Self-supported, adjustable, condensation-free shower mirror
US4848542 *Apr 18, 1988Jul 18, 1989Richard BurnettePackage for retaining and mounting a mirror
US4856888 *Jan 19, 1988Aug 15, 1989Wahl Clipper CorporationAdjustable telescoping mirrors
US4993821 *Oct 2, 1989Feb 19, 1991Showertek, Inc.Self-supported, adjustable, condensation-free shower mirror
US5032015 *Oct 27, 1989Jul 16, 1991Shower Tek, Inc.Self-supported, adjustable, condensation-free shower mirror
US5173804 *Jul 26, 1991Dec 22, 1992Kent DogeyMirror and method of mounting the same
US5521760 *Jul 11, 1994May 28, 1996Donnelly CorporationEnergy absorbing rearview mirror assembly
US5604633 *Oct 12, 1995Feb 18, 1997Showertek, Inc.Condensation-free shower mirror heated by hot shower stream
US5731569 *Dec 5, 1995Mar 24, 1998Crescenzo; GeorgeMirror attachment to prevent the formation of condensation
US5805765 *Oct 28, 1996Sep 8, 1998Altman; MitchellWall-mounted steam generating apparatus and a steam head
USRE32906 *Dec 3, 1987Apr 18, 1989 Shower mirror apparatus
EP0871051A1 *Apr 11, 1997Oct 14, 1998Bok Lae KimMirror assembly having a steaming up preventing system
WO1989000706A1 *Jul 22, 1988Jan 26, 1989Thomas R ChristiansonSelf-supported, adjustable, condensation-free shower mirror
Classifications
U.S. Classification359/512, 248/467, 4/597, 165/168, 165/47
International ClassificationG02B7/18
Cooperative ClassificationA47G1/02, G02B7/1815
European ClassificationG02B7/18T1