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Publication numberUS3708431 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 2, 1973
Filing dateApr 26, 1971
Priority dateApr 26, 1971
Publication numberUS 3708431 A, US 3708431A, US-A-3708431, US3708431 A, US3708431A
InventorsS Prussin
Original AssigneeS Prussin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing package
US 3708431 A
Abstract
Packages are described which comprise surfactant-forming acid and surfactant-forming base compositions maintained isolated from each other within a container with valve means communicating with each composition. Actuation of the valve means results in dispensing a surfactant. Through use of chemical heat generating means within the package, the surfactant can be dispensed in a warmed state.
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United States Patent 1 Prussin [4 Jan. 2, 1973 54] DISPENSING PACKAGE 3,372,839 3/1968 Hayes ..222/l46 Inventor: Samuei B l-jrussin, L05 Angelesg 3,488,287 1/1970 Seglin ..252/90 Cahf' 90049 Primary Examiner-Leon D. Rosdol [22] Filed: April 26, 1971 Assistant Examiner-William E. Schulz Attorney-Paul R. Wylie, Harold R. Beck, Leigh B. [21] Appl' 137606 Taylor and Michael L. Dunn [52] US. Cl. ..252/188.3, 252/90, 424/73 [57] ABSTRACT [51] Int. Cl. ..C09k 3/00 e Packages are described which comprise surfactant- [58] 41 forming acid and surfactant-forming base composi- 3 tions maintained isolated from each other within a R f d container with valve means communicating with each e erences composition. Actuation of the valve means results in UNITED STATES PATENTS dispensing a surfactant Through use of chemical heat generating means within the package, the surfactant lgfizes et al can be dispensed in a warmed State. 3,240,396 3/1966 Friedenberg ..222/l46 16 Claims, N0 Drawings DISPENSING PACKAGE This invention relates to packages filled with two compositions maintained isolated from each other within a container, such packages adapted for the mixing of the isolated compositions and dispensing of the resulting mixture from the container. Such packages are particularly useful in dispensing of compositions in aerosol form for shaving and other purposes and may in accordance with the invention be dispensed at ambient temperatures or in a warmed state.

Cosmetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts over the years to develop means for producing lather compositions for shaving purposes to eliminate the inconvenience of using a shaving brush and a cake of shaving soap. U.S. Pat. No. 2,655,480 to .l. G. Spitzer et al. represented a considerable step forward in the art of lather-producing compositions. This patent describes a package filled with a mixture of an aqueous soap solution and volatile propellant, the package being fitted with a dispensing valve means, with actuation of the valve resulting in the dispensing of a lather composition from a pressurized container adapted for shaving and other cleansing purposes. Such compositions represent a considerable step forward in the art of lather production but suffer from a fundamental disadvantage. The soap solution and volatile propellant are present within the pressure-tight container in the form of a liquid emulsion. Such an emulsion cannot be prepared with a sufficient degree of stability to eliminate the necessity for shaking the container prior to use and all such packages must be shaken before use to reconstitute the emulsion. As will be readily apparent, shaking of any soap composition within this context results in the creation of a foam. It has been found that when packages formed in accordance with Pat. No. 2,655,480 are less than about 25 percent full, shaking of the container tends to result in filling the entire container with foam with elimination of any discrete liquid phase. Actuation of the valve under such conditions results in dispensing of a lather in a poorly foamed state, such lather collapsing virtually immediately and being generally unsuitable for use, particularly for shaving purposes. As a result, when packages filled in accordance with U.S. Pat. No. 2,655,480 are less than 25 percent full, they are generally unsuited for use and must be replaced with resulting added cost to consumers. Accordingly, there has long been a need for a means to create a package for dispensing of compositions in foam form from pressurized containers where either shaking can be eliminated, or where shaking will not create a detrimental foam within the package, and where the entire contents of the package can be used with optimum maintenance of specifications for the intended purpose.

Recently, workers in the art of cosmetic chemistry have developed self-heating compositions which can be dispensed from a pressurized container in a warmed state, a particularly desirable condition for shaving and certain other cosmetic purposes. Typical packages and compositions for this purpose are described in U.S. Pats. Nos. 3,325,056; 3,326,416; and 3,341,418. In all of these patents, the self-heating action is efi'ectuated by chemical reaction between an oxidizing agent such as hydrogen peroxide and reducing agents such as alkali metal sulfites and thiourea, the oxidizing agent and reducing agent being maintained isolated from each other within the pressurized container. The packages described in the above-mentioned three U.S. patents represent modifications of the system described in the Spitzer et al. U.S. Pat, No. 2,655,480, in that a separate compartment is provided in the package to hold the oxidizing agent. In the compositions described in the above-mentioned patents, the oxidizing agent is maintained in the separate compartment at concentrations ranging from 7 percent hydrogen peroxide in U.S. Pat. No. 3,326,416 to 30 percent hydrogen peroxide in U.S. Pat. No. 3,325,056. Such concentrated solutions of hydrogen peroxide have characteristics of burning and bleaching of the skin if placed directly in contact with the skin which could occur should the soap composition in the main body portion of the container be exhausted or change density by foam formation within the container while there still remains some oxidizing agent in the separate compartment. While this problem could at least theoretically be resolved by placing the oxidizing agent in the main body portion of the container, this is not feasible technically in that hydrogen peroxide is not stable in the alkaline medium of the soap composition. There has, therefore, been a need for the creation of packages adapted for dispensing self-heating compositions in which the oxidizing agent is not present in a concentration sufficiently high to be detrimental to the skin should it be dispensed individually, and yet where efficient dispensing of the composition can be realized without an overly large package size.

The invention sought to be patented resides in the concept of a package adapted for the dispensing of a surfactant composition comprising a container with means to maintain surfactant-forming acid and surfactant-forming base compositions isolated from each other within the container; means to apply pressure to each of said compositions and valve means communicating with each composition whereby actuation of the valve means results in the mixing of portions of each of said composition and dispensing of the mixture from the package as a surfactant composition. Packages within the scope of the invention can be constituted to dispense a warmed surfactant composition by including heat generation means within the package as will be described in detail hereinafter.

The manner and process of making and using the invention will now be described generally so as to enable one skilled in the art of cosmetic chemistry to make and use the same as follows:

Packages within the scope of the present invention are in the form of a container filled with two compositions which are maintained isolated from each other. One of these compositions comprises a surfactantforrning acid and the other comprises a surfactantforrning base. As used herein, the term surfactant" is used in the broad sense to identify and define substances which, by themselves or with additives, form detergents, that is to say, among other effects they exert a cleansing action on a surface by surface-active properties; they also, by themselves or with additives are emulsifiers, that is to say, because of their surfaceactive properties they stabilize mixtures of otherwise immiscible materials. The term surfactant" thus, for the purposes of the art herein taught, embraces compositions derived from naturally occurring substances which are commonly referred to as soaps as well as compositions derived from substances prepared synthetically.

Surfactant-forming acids useful in the formulation of packages within the scope of the invention include carboxylic acids having not less than 10 carbon atoms, for example lauric acid, palmitic acid, stearic acid and the like, including mixtures of such acids as the mixture of stearic and palmitic acid which constitutes commercial stearic acid and coconut oil fatty acids, ethoxylated carboxylic acids having at least 10 carbon atoms, for example polyethoxystearic acids (in which the polyethoxyether moieties contain 5 to 40 ethoxy groups), alkyl aryl sulfonic acids having at least carbon atoms, for example tridecyl benzene sulfonic acid, alkyl esters of sulfuric acid having at least 10 carbon atoms, for example lauryl sulfuric acid, alkyl ethers of polyethoxyesters of sulfuric acid in which the alkyl portion contains at least 10 carbon atoms and the polyethoxy portion contains 5 to 40 ethoxy groups, for example lauryl polyoxyethylene sulfuric acid, and amido carboxylic acids having at least 10 carbon atoms in the amido portion, for example lauroyl sarcosinic acid.

Surfactant-forming bases useful in the formulation of packages within the scope of the invention are basic materials capable of reacting with the surfactant-forming acid present to form a surfactant. Useful surfactantforming bases include alkali metal (for example sodium and potassium) hydroxides, carbonates, bicarbonates, borates and phosphates and surfactant-forming organic bases such as morpholine, triethanolamine and aminopropane-diol.

The composition comprising a surfactant forming acid is present in the package in solution or as an aqueous emulsion in the presence of non-soap producing emulsifiers of the type well known in the art of emulsion technology. Typical emulsifiers include polyoxyethylene cholesteryl ether, polyoxyethylene lauryl ether, polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate and polyethylene glycol and polypropylene glycol copolymers. The composition may also include additives depending upon the end use of the ultimate composition to be dispensed from the package. Where a stable foam is desired, as for example for use in shaving, humectants designed to minimize rate of drying may be present such as glycerin, propylene glycol, sorbitol and the like. For cosmetic purposes, a perfume is normally used to impart a desired degree of fragrance to the product. Packages prepared in accordance with the invention are useful not only for cosmetic purposes, such as shaving, shampooing, hair dyeing and bleaching, and general cleansing purposes, but also for dispensing medicinal compositions for topical use such as analgesics, chest rubs and the like and for such purpose, a medicinal agent such as methyl salicylate, thymol, eucalyptol or other essential oil, a local anesthetic such as benzocaine, and other topically useful medicinal agents will be present to impart the desired medicinal effect.

The other composition comprising a surfactantforming base can, in the case of a liquid base such as triethanolamine or morpholine, consist solely of such base. Where normally solid surfactant-forming bases are used, such as the alkali metal hydroxides, carbonates, bicarbonates, borates or phosphates, the base can be present in solution or suspension in water or an inert non-aqueous liquid. Where ammonium hydroxide is used, a solution of aqueous ammonia is useful.

As described above, the two compositions are maintained isolated from each other within a container. Such a container is constructed of rigid or flexible material depending upon the pressurization means to be utilized for dispensing. A collapsible container formed of plastic or metal is used where pressurization is effected manually be squeezing. In accordance with the preferred embodiment of this invention, self-pressurization is employed through use of a liquefied propellant gas within the container in either or both of the isolated compositions and in this case, a pressuretight container having sufficient wall strength to withstand the propellant pressure is employed. The container can be formed of a wide class of materials used in the art of aerosol packaging such as glass, rigid plastics and metal. Such propellants must be of such a nature that they do not destroy the surfactant or its ingredients and thus must be fully compatible therewith. Such propellants should have vapor pressure of approximately 12 to 85 pounds per square inch gauge at F using as propellants saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as propane, butane, isobutane, and the like, and/or chlorofluoralkanes containing not more than two carbon atoms and at least one fluorine atom having the desired vapor pressure for use in the invention. Propellant gasses such as carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide or liquefied propellants such as dimethyl ether with a high degree of water solubility may also be used as pressurization means.

The two compositions, formulated as described above, are packaged within a container in such a way as to remain isolated with each other. Valve means are provided to communicate with each composition such that upon actuatuion of the valve means, a quantity of each composition is mixed and the resulting mixture is dispensed from the package. Since the compositions comprise, respectively, a surfactant-forming acid and a surfactant-forming base, the product of a mixture of the two constitutes a surfactant. It is apparent that the concentration of the respective ingredients must be adjusted in relation to the proportioning properties of the valve means such that a proper mixture of the two compositions based upon the desired end use results from actuation of the valve means.

There are many different ways in which the final package can be constructed which will influence the selection of appropriate valve means and the means selected for pressurization. Several such ways are discussed hereinafter.

The package can be constructed in the form of a twochambered container, separated by a rigid well, with each chamber fitted with a valve leading to a common discharge conduit. Such a structure is illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 2,941,696 and with such, both compositions are pressurized. Altemately, structure as illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 3,295,727 can be employed in which case one of compositions is pressurized and is present in the body portion of the container with the second composition in the illustrated chamber surrounding the dip tube. Pressurized vapors from the first composition act upon the second composition in this structure. U.S.

Pat. No. 3,272,389 illustrates another form of package construction useful in the invention. In this structure, venturi action of one pressurized composition provides the motive force for dispensing the second composition.

A particularly desirable form of package for dispensing a surfactant composition in accordance with the invention is to utilize a package having two compartments in which the two compositions are packaged within a pressure-tight container, the compartments being separated by a movable wall actuatable upon a pressure differential between the two compartments when the valve means affixed to the container are actuated. In such a system, the movable wall can be in the form of amovable piston, for example, as illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 3,217,936, or in the form ofa collapsible bag as illustrated in US. Pat. No. 2,973,883. The disclosures of the aforementioned patents are incorporated by reference herein for illustrative purposes to the same extent as if set forth at length. It is to be understood that such patents are merely illustrative of various means to package the two compositions of this invention within a container and to dispense portions of both compositions to insure mixing and dispensing upon actuation of the valve means.

Packages of this invention are filled by conventional means. Where pressurization is brought about by a liquefied propellant included in either or both compositions, filling can be by either pressure-or-cold-filling techniques. lf cold filling is employed, a propellant having an atmospheric pressure boiling point temperature of above 32 F must be used to avoid freezing of the water present in the compositions.

The above description has been with respect to the compounding of the two compositions comprising, respectively, a surfactant-forming acid and surfactantforming base where the composition to be formed on dispensing from the package is at ambient temperatures. In accordance with a specific embodiment of this invention, dispensing of a warmed composition is realized by the incorporation within the package of chemical heat-generation means. Heat generation, in accordance with this embodiment of the invention is realized by the chemical reduction or catalytic decomposition of H 0 or by the heat of solution of anhydrous magnesium chloride.

When chemical heat generation is effected by chemical reduction or catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide is most conveniently incorporated in the composition comprising the surfactant-forming acid, the acidic pH creating an environment in which hydrogen peroxide is completely stable. Heat generation can be effected by chemical reduction of the hydrogen peroxide by a reducing agent which is maintained isolated from the hydrogen peroxide by incorporation in the composition comprising the surfactant-forming base. Useful reducing agents include sulfur dioxide and salts derived therefrom such as alkali metal sulfites and bisulfites, thiourea, l-phenyl-2- thiobarbituric acid and its derivatives as described in US. Pat. No. 3,341,418, alkali metal sulfides, alkali metal thiosulfates and the like. It has been found that sulfur dioxide and salts derived therefrom and alkali metal thiosulfates are particularly useful reducing agents. For example, sulfur dioxide is soluble in surfactam-forming organic bases such as triethanolamine and morpholine, the resulting solutions constituting the composition comprising surfactant-forming base in the preparation of packages of the invention where a warmed surfactant is desired. Alternately, potassium sulfite or sodium th'iosulfate dissolved in an aqueous solution of triethanolamine constitutes another particularly useful composition comprising surfactant-forming base.

The relative proportions of hydrogen peroxide and reducing agent are adjusted to be a stoichiometric mixture or within i 10 percent of stoichiometric. The absolute quantities are selected based upon the temperature rise desired, which should be at least 25 F above ambient temperatures for meaningful heating.

Heat generation can also be effected by catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, a reaction liberating heat with the formation of water and oxygen gas. Many materials are well-known in the art as catalyzing such decomposition, for example such metals as silver, lead, iron, chromium, bismuth, copper, titanium, molybdenum and silicon, oxides and salts thereof, activated carbon, enzymatic systems such as catalase and the like. The catalyst can be in solid form located adjacent to the valve means in the package such that dispensing causes the mixture of surfactant-forming acid plus hydrogen peroxide composition and surfactant-forming base composition to pass over the catalyst prior to dispensing. Alternately, the catalyst can be present in the surfactant-forming base composition in solution or suspension, a particularly advantageous means since fresh catalyst is available for contact with the hydrogen peroxide present in the surfactant-forming acid composition upon each actuation of the valve means. This avoids any possibility of reduction in catalyst efficiency during the life of the package through catalyst poisoning.

Where catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide constitutes the heat generation means, the quantity of hydrogen peroxide in the detergent-forming acid composition is adjusted based upon the degree of temperature rise desired, with at least a 25 percent rise being desirable for meaningful heating.

The embodiment of this invention where a warmed detergent is dispensed has been described with specific reference to hydrogen peroxide as the agent which is subjected to catalytic decomposition or reduction to liberate heat. It is apparent that other substances of like properties can also be used, such as derivatives of hydrogen peroxide, for example urea hydrogen peroxide and other organic and inorganic peroxides, as well as perborates and persulfates, all of which are the full equivalents to hydrogen peroxide in the preparation of packages within the scope of the invention. Where alkaline equivalents of hydrogen peroxide are used, they are incorporated in the surfactant-forming base composition.

Heat generation is also effected by use of the heat of solution of anhydrous magnesium chloride in water. In accordance with this embodiment, anhydrous magnesium chloride is incorporated in solution or suspension in the surfactant-forming base composition which must be free of water. The surfactant-forming acid composition includes water and when the two compositions are mixed during dispensing, the contact between the magnesium chloride and the water present in the surfactant-forming acid composition results in solution of magnesium chloride with evolution of heat. It is apparent that other materials of like properties can be used in lieu of magnesium chloride, for example, metallic salts such as aluminum chloride, such materials causing the evolution of heat upon solution in water and being the full equivalent of anhydrous magnesium chloride in the preparation of packages in accordance with the invention where heat generation means based upon heat of solution are employed.

It is a particular attribute of packages of this invention where a warmed surfactant is produced utilizing reduction or decomposition of hydrogen peroxide as the heat generation means component is present at low concentration in the package. For example, a 25 F temperature rise can be realized with a concentration of hydrogen peroxide comprising only 0.59 percent of the total weight of the mixed compositions in an aqueous emulsion of surfactant-forming acid where potassium sulfite is used as a reducing agent and at a concentration of 2.02 percent of the total weight of the mixed compositions where catalytic decomposition is effected. Such concentrations of hydrogen peroxide are at a sufficiently low level to exert no adverse action on the skin should the surfactant-forming acid composition come into contact with the skin.

The best mode contemplated by the inventor for carrying out his invention will now be set forth as follows:

EXAMPLE 1 The following ingredients in the proportions indicated are heated to 75 C, mixed with stirring and cooled to room temperature with stirring:

Parts by weig Water is then added to make 100 parts. The resulting composition constitutes a composition comprising a surfactant-forming acid.

A composition comprising a surfactant-forming base is formulated to consist of 50 percent by weight of triethanolamine and 50 percent by weight of glycerin.

These compositions are used in preparing a package in accordance with the invention, as follows, the ultimate package to be in the form illustrated in US. Pat. No. 2,973,883:

Fill 97 parts by weight of the detergent-forming acid composition into a pressure tight container. Fill a collapsible container having a diameter smaller than the opening in the pressure tight container with 14 parts by weight of the surfactant-forming base composition. Insert collapsible container and affix valve means to communicate individually with the two compositions, the valve means being constructed such that actuation causes flow in the relative proportions of 6.9 parts of acid compositions to 1 part of alkali composition. Pressurize container with 3 parts by weight of a mixture of 84 percent isobutane l6 percent-propane. Actuation of the valve means results in the mixing of portions of the acid and base compositions to yield a surfactant which is dispensed as a creamy, cosmetically elegant foam, ideally suited for shaving purposes.

The following examples illustrate the preparation of other compositions within the scope of the invention where the surfactant is dispensed at room temperature:

EXAMPLE 2 A package of the type described in Example 1 is prepared with the following compositions:

Surfactant-forming Acid Composition Tridecyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid (97.5%) 96 parts by weight Surfactant-fuming Base Composition Triethanolamine Sodium Hydroxide 0.50 Water 51.50

Parts by weight 48 The ingredients are packaged with 104 parts of the acid in the container and 100 parts of the base composition in the collapsible container. Pressurization is effected with 4 parts of a mixture of 84 percent isobutane-l6 percent propane. Valve means are used to proportion the ingredients in the relative proportions of 1.08 parts of acid composition to 1 part base composition. A creamy foam is produced upon actuation of the valve means. The package need not be shaken prior to use.

EXAMPLE 3 A package of the type described in Example 1 is prepared with the following compositions:

Surfactant Forming Acid Composition Parts by Weight Stearic Acid 22.7 3 Lauroyl Diethanolamide 22.73 Hexylene Glycol 22.7 3 Water, distilled 22.73

The first three ingredients are combined and the mixture heated to C with mixing. The water is added and the mixture is cooled with mixing.

Surfactant Fonning Base Composition EXAMPLE 4 A package of the type described in Example 1 is prepared using the procedure set forth in Example 3, except that the following surfactant-forming acid composition is used:

Pans by Weight lsostearic acid 22.73 Dipropylene glycol 22.73 Water 45.00 Morpholine 0.46

A creamy lather is produced upon valve actuation.

The following Examples are illustrative of packages within the scope of the invention where a warmed detergent foam is produced utilizing reduction of hydrogen peroxide to generate heat. In all the Examples, a heat rise of at least 25 F is attained.

EXAMPLE The following ingredients in the proportions indicated are heated to 75 C, mixing with stirring, and

cooled to room temperature with stirring.

Parts by Weight Stearic Acid, Triple Pressed 11.20 Coconut Oil Fatty Acids (Primarily 12 to 16 Carbon Atoms) 2.25 Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether 1.90 Polyoxyehtylene (24) Cholesteryl ether 2.00 Water, Deionized 50.00 ...At room temperature, the following is added Hydrogen Peroxide (35 per cent) 8.00

The resulting composition constitutes a composition comprising a surfactant-forming acid.

A composition comprising a surfactant-forming base is formulated as follows:

Parts by Weight Triethanolammonium sulfite 15.1 Triethanolamine 4.0 Prepared by bubbling stoic-hiometric quantity of sulfur dioxide into triethanolamine.

These compositions are used in preparing a package according to Example 1 with the exception that valve means are used to proportion the ingredients in the relative proportions of 4 parts of acid composition to 1 part base composition.

The following Examples 6-12 are illustrative of different surfactant-forming base compositions used in lieu of that set forth in Example 5.

Parts by Weight Sodium Thiosulfate 16.3 Potassium Carbonate 8.0 Glycerin 29.6 Water, Deionized 17.8 Triethanolamine 28.2 Ammonium Molybdate 0.1

EXAMPLE 10 Parts by Weight Potassium Sulfite 36.1 Sodium Sulfite 6.0 Triethanolamine 28.2 Glycerin 29.7

EXAMPLE 1 1 Parts by Weight Sodium Thiosulfate 9.00 Potassium Hydroxide 3.75 Potassium Sulfite 18.05 Sodium Sulfite 3.00 Triethanolamine 28.20 Glycerin 29.70 Water, Deionized 8.30

EXAMPLE 12 Parts by WEight Sodium Thiosulfate 8.15 Potassium Hydroxide 3.75 Potassium Sulfite 18.05 Sodium Sulfite 3.00 Triethanolamine 28.20 Glycerin 29.69 Water, Deionized 9.15 Ammonium Molybdate 0.10

The following Example illustrates the use of an equivalent of hydrogen peroxide, sodium peroxide, in the preparation of a package to dispense a warmed surfactant:

EXAMPLE 13 The following ingredients in the proportions indicated are heated to C, mixed with stirring and cooled to room temperature with stirring:

Lauryl Polyoxyethylene (24) Ether Sulfuric Acid 40.0 Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether 1.9 Polyoxyethylene (20) Cholesteryl Ether 2.0 Water 30.0

25.5 grams of Anhydrous Potassium Sulfite is then added, and water added to a total of parts, thereby yielding a surfactant-forming acid composition.

A composition comprising a surfactant-forming base is made as follows:

Parts by Weight Light Mineral Oil 65.15 Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether 0.62 Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, dry 2.93 Sodium Peroxide 12.6 Anhydrous Potassium Carbonate 18.7

Disperse the Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether in the Mineral Oil with heat, if necessary. The other ingredients are then ball-milled with the Mineral 011 under anhydrous conditions until the particulate matter has been reduced to a particle size of 50 microns or less.

The compositions are packaged as described in Example l.

The following Example illustrates the preparation of a package adapted to dispensing a warmed surfactant where heat generation is effected by the heat of solution of anhydrous magnesium chloride.

EXAMPLE 14 Parts by Weigh Lauryl Polyoxyethylene (24) Ether Sulfuric Acid 40.0 Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether 1.9 Polyoxyethylene Cholesteryl Ether 2.0 Water, sufficient to make 100.00

The several ingredients are added to the water and the mixture warmed with stirring until it is homogeneous and clear.

Surfactant-forming base composition:

Parts by WEight Magnesium Chloride, Anhydrous 29.20 Sodium Carbonate, Anhydrous 29.20 Polyoxethylene (23) Lauryl Ether 0.62 Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, dry 2.93 Light Mineral Oil 38.05

EXAMPLE 15 A package is prepared as described in Example 1 with the following composition substituted for the surfactant-forming base composition:

Light Mineral Oil 78.05 Sodium Oxide 18.4 Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether 0.62 Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, dry 2.93

Disperse the Polyoxyethylene (23) Lauryl Ether in the Mineral Oil with heat. The other ingredients are then ball-milled with the Mineral Oil under anhydrous conditions until the particulate matter has been reduced to a particle size of 50 microns or less.

The foregoing Examples have been directed to the preparation of packages adapted to the dispensing of a surfactant having primary use as a shaving composition. The following examples illustrate the preparation of packages in accordance with the invention having specific use for other purposes. In each instance, a warmed surfactant is produced and the compositions are packaged as described in Example 1.

EXAMPLE 16 (Shampoo) Parts by Weight Surfactant-forming acid: N-cocoyl (l2-16 carbon atom fatty acids) sarcosinic acid l0.0 Polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether [.9 Polyoxyethylene (24) cholesteryl ether 2.0 Water 60.0

Heat to 70 C and mix with cooling Add: Hydrogen Peroxide (35%) 8.0 water, to 100.00 parts Surfactant-Forming Base:

Parts by Weight Triethanolamine 28.2

EXAMPLE 17 (Shampoo) In Example 16, substitute the following as the surfactam-forming acid composition:

Partsby Weight Water, Distilled, to

Surfactant-Forming Base Parts by Weight Triethanolamine 28.2

Glycerin 29.7 Potassium Sulfite 36.l Sodium Sulfite 6.0

It is to be understood that the invention is not to be limited to the exact compositions shown and described, as obvious modifications and equivalents will be apparent to one skilled in the art, and the invention is therefore to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims. The subject matter which the applicant regards as his invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed as follows.

l claim:

1. In combination:

a container means having at least two isolation chambers, one of said chambers containing a surfactantforming acid selected from the group consisting of unsubstituted carboxylic acid having lO-l8 carbons, mixtures of said acids, ethoxylated derivatives of said acids having 5-40 ethoxy groups, alkyl benzene sulfonic acid having 10-13 carbons in the alkyl portion thereof, alkyl esters of sulfuric acid having l0-l3 carbons, alkyl sarcosinic acid having 10-13 carbons and alkyl ethers of polyethoxyesters of sulfuric acid in which the alkyl portion contains 10-13 carbons and the polyethoxy portion contains 5 to 40 ethoxy groups;

another of said chambers containing a surfactantforming base selected from the group consisting of alkali metal hydroxides, carbonates, bicarbonates, borates and phospates, ammonimum hydroxide, morpholine, triethanolamine and aminopropanediol; and,

valve means in communication with said chambers including flow passages of predetermined size for proportioning amounts of said surfactant-forming acid and base upon actuation of said valve means whereby an effective cosmetic surfactant composition is formed within said valve means and dispensed in aerosol form and wherein at least one of said chambers contains a liquified gas having a vapor pressure at 70 F of between 12 to 85 pounds per square inch guage.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said surfactant-forming base is selected from the group consisting of triethanolamine and morpholine.

3. The combination of claim 1 wherein one of said chambers contains hydrogen peroxide and another of said chambers contains a hydrogen peroxide reducing agent selected from the group consisting of alkali metal sulfites, alkali metal bisulfites, thiourea, l-phenyl-2- thiobarbituric acid, alkali metal sulfides, and alkali metal thiosulfates, said hydrogen peroxide and said reducing agent present in'amounts sufficient to effect about at last a 25 percent increase in temperature above ambient of said dispensed surfactant composition.

4. The combination of claim 3 wherein said reducing agent is included in said surfactant-forming base.

5. The combination of claim 3 wherein said surfactant-forming base includes triethanolamine in solution with a member of the group consisting of sulfur dioxide or alkali metal thiosulfates.

' 6. The combination of claim 5 wherein said reducing agent is triethanolammonium sulfite. 7. The combination of claim 4 wherein said surfactant-forming base includes a member selected from the group consisting of potassium sulfite and sodium thiosulfate dissolved in an aqueous solution of triethanolamine.

8. The combination of claim 1 wherein said surfactant-forming acid is stearic acid.

9. The combination of claim 1 wherein said surfactaut-forming acid is the fatty acid fraction derived from coconut oil.

10. The combination of claim 1 wherein said surfactant-forming acid is tridecyl benzene sulfonic acid.

11. The combination of claim 1 wherein said surfactaut-forming acid is lauryl polyoxyethylene (24) ether sulfuric acid.

12. The combination of claim 1 wherein said surfactant-forming acid is N-cocoyl sarcosinic acid.

13. The combination of claim 3 wherein said surfactant-forming acid is stearic acid.

14. The combination of claim 3 wherein said surfactant-forming acid is the fatty acid fraction derived from coconut oil.

15. The combination of claim 3 wherein said surfactam-forming acid is tridecyl benzene sulfonic acid.

16. The combination of claim 3 wherein said surfactant-forming acid is lauryl polyoxyethylene (24) ether sulfuric acid.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3819524 *Dec 7, 1972Jun 25, 1974Colgate Palmolive CoCosmetic composition for thermal dispensing
US4501923 *Sep 13, 1982Feb 26, 1985Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyProcess for preparing adrenochrome
US5455035 *Jan 13, 1994Oct 3, 1995Elizabeth Arden Company, Division Of Conopco, Inc.Clear two-phase cosmetic composition
US5500210 *May 23, 1994Mar 19, 1996The Gillette CompanyCombined two-part reducing agent/humectant shaving system for improved shaving comfort
US5618515 *Feb 7, 1994Apr 8, 1997Blistex Inc.Aerosol spray composition for the treatment of dermal burns by cooling and anesthetizing the wound and valved container for dispensing same
US5681805 *May 25, 1995Oct 28, 1997The Clorox CompanyLiquid peracid precursor colloidal dispersions: microemulsions
US5744439 *Feb 1, 1996Apr 28, 1998Reckitt & Colman Products LimitedCompositions and process for bleaching surfaces and/or removing limescale therefrom
US5776877 *May 25, 1995Jul 7, 1998The Clorox CompanyLiquid peracid precursor colloidal dispersions: macroemulsions
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/146.3, 510/372, 424/73, 222/219, 510/120
International ClassificationA61Q5/08, A61K8/22, A61K9/12, A61K8/02, A61Q9/02, A61Q5/10, A45D27/10, A61Q5/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61Q9/02, A61K2800/242, A61Q5/02, A61K2800/88, A61Q5/08, A61K8/02, A61Q5/10, A61K9/12, A61K8/22, A61K2201/052
European ClassificationA61Q5/02, A61K8/02, A61K9/12, A61Q9/02, A61K8/22, A61Q5/10, A61Q5/08