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Publication numberUS3708837 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 9, 1973
Filing dateMay 13, 1970
Priority dateMay 13, 1970
Publication numberUS 3708837 A, US 3708837A, US-A-3708837, US3708837 A, US3708837A
InventorsChiba Y
Original AssigneeKanebo Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
An improved fabric fastener
US 3708837 A
Abstract
The fabric fastener comprising two cloths adapted to engage with each other, wherein one of them is provided with the numerous mushroom engaging sections on its surface, while the other one is a two-ply cloth composed of two pieces of cloth combined by connecting strings and one of these two pieces is made to have numerous meshes in its surface.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Unitefi States Patent [191 Chiba 11 3,708,837 1 Jan. 9, 1 973 [541 IMPROVED FABRIC FASTENER [75] Inventor: Yoshio Chiba, Osaka, Japan [73] Assignee: Kanebo, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan 8/1966 Altman ..24/201 V UX FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS 246,968 1 1/1960 Australia ..24/204 1,140,576 1/1969 Great Britain...

310,284 4/1969 I Sweden ..24/204 Primary Examiner-Bernard A. Cielak Attorney-Christen & Sabol [57] ABSTRACT The fabric fastener comprising two cloths adapted to engage with each other, wherein one of them is provided with the numerous mushroom engaging sections on its surface, while the other one is atwo-ply cloth composed of two pieces of cloth combined by connecting strings and one of these two pieces is made to have numerous meshes in its surface.

1 Claim, 7 Drawing Figures 1 IMPROVED FABRIC FASTENER The present invention relates to an improved fabric fastener and, more particularly, to a fabric fastener wherein synthetic thermoplastic piles made of nylon,

for instance, are first woven into a piece of cloth and the tips of said piles are cut separate in order to form spinescent filaments, which can be made also by cutting the connecting filaments or strings of two-ply cloth in their'center, and which are then thermally or sewing it thereto, there must be a gap between said one-ply cloth and the clothing, whereinto said mushroom engaging sections can be forced to enter. But, such a gap cannot be easily formed between them. Hence, it is very difficult to manufacture this kind of fastener according to the conventional method.

' In view of the above-mentioned shortcoming of the conventional fastener,'the fastener of the present invention uses two-ply cloths having an appropriate gap between them which are held together by means of connecting filamentsor strings. One ply of the two-ply cloth is fixed to the clothing, while the other one is applied to the surface of the cloth to which the two-ply cloth is to be fastened.

For a more detailed description of the invention, reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings which illustrate one of the embodying examples of the invention, as follows:

FIG. 1 is a side view of the single side piled fabric.

FIG. 2 is a schematic side view of the fabric when the tips of its piles are cut separate.

FIG. 3 illustrates how the connecting filaments or strings of the two ply cloth are cut separate in-their mally melting the tips of said spinescent filaments 3 made of synthetic thermoplastic resin, the mushroom engaging sections 4 can be formed at the tips of spinescent filaments 3 as shown in FIG. 4. One of the concrete examples of the apparatus to form said mushroom engaging sections 4 is shown by FIG. 5, wherein the piece of cloth 1.2 is fed at a fixed speed into the machine by a pair of the rollers 11 and 12, while the tips of said spinescent filaments 3 formed on one side of said piece of cloth 1.2 are heated by means of the heater 13 so as to melt them. It is desirous that the said piece of cloth 1.2 is sent through the water or a water soluble starchy material, so that the surface of said piece of cloth 1.2 may be protected by a liquid film from being burnt up by the heat of the heater 13.

On the other hand, the structure of cloth for engaging the afore-said piece of cloth 1.2 is just the same as an ordinary two ply cloth, as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7.. It

is composed of two pieces of cloth 8 woven with the woof6 and the'warp 7, and 9 woven with woof 16 and piece of cloth 8.

FIG. 6 is a side view of the fastened condition of the two fastening fabrics.

FIG. 7 is a section taken along the line I I' of FIG.

The piled fabric which is shownin FIG. 1, and which is the base for forming the engaging sections on one ply of the two ply cloth, is made of the woof l and the warp 2 as well as the pile filament 3. In comparison with a comparatively soft piece of cloth 1.2, said pile filament 3 is made of a very elastic synthetic thermoplastic resin such as nylon. After weaving the piled filament 3 together with said woof l and the warp2, their looped tips are cut separate by an edged tool so as to produce numerous spinescent filaments 3 on one of the surfaces of the piece of cloth 1.2as shown in FIG. 2. We can also form numerous spinescent filaments 3 on the surface of said piece of cloth 1.2 by cutting separate the connecting filaments or strings'of two pieces of cloth 1.2 and 1.2 of the two ply cloth in their center by the use of a knife 10 as shown in FIG. 3. After that, by ther- When the surface of the above-mentioned piece of the two ply fabric is piled on that of the piece of cloth 1.2 having the mushroom engaging sections 4 and then pressed together, the spinescent strings 3 on the surface of the said cloth 1.2 will be forced to enter into the respective meshes 5 of one ply 8 of the two ply cloth, so that the mushroom engaging sections 4 will act to engage with said piece of cloth 8, as shown by FIGS. 6 and 7. The engagement of both pieces of cloth is tight enough to prevent them from being easily separated. But, whenever necessary, they can be separated conveniently by hand from each other.

Since the two ply cloth is used as one of the engaging sections-in the present invention, the surface of its one piece will be fixed to the clothes and the like, while the other piece can be held up above the surface of the clothes, so that into the meshes of the held'up piece of cloth can be pushed the mushroom engaging sections in such a manner that the mushroo rn sectioris canbe engaged with the 'meshe's far more steadily than the con- I ventional' fabric fasteners. Furthermore, such a fabric fastener according to the invention can be readily manufactured without taking much time.

While'preferred embodiments have been described above in detail, it will be understood that numerous modifications might be resorted to without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the following claim: I

What is claimed: 7

1. Fabric fastener characterized by two cloths adapted to overlie and be attached to each other, a first said cloth having on its surface a plurality of upstanding mushroom-shaped filamentshaving mushroom heads connected by spinescent strings to said first cloth,:and a second said cloth comprising a base fabricand an open that the mushroom heads of said first cloth are adapted to be forced at an angle through the meshes of said second cloth to be disposed in said gap and resist outward movement through said meshes by reason of the substantially flat underside of said mushroom head's.

i i i

Patent Citations
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US1609248 *Oct 17, 1924Nov 30, 1926Harkins Cloyd SBaby band
US3138841 *Oct 23, 1962Jun 30, 1964Naimer JackSeparable fastening fabrics
US3266841 *Jul 7, 1965Aug 16, 1966Gustave AltmanProtective cover having means for releasably securing it to a surface
US3319307 *Oct 12, 1964May 16, 1967Italo MarforioFabric fastening assembly
US3527629 *Nov 15, 1966Sep 8, 1970Velcro Sa SoulieMethod of producing fastener member having upstanding fastener elements shaped for releasable engagement with cooperating fastener elements
US3562770 *Jun 22, 1967Feb 9, 1971Velcro Sa SoulieSeparable fastener of the flexible hooking type
US3577607 *Jun 13, 1968May 4, 1971Ikoma Orimono Co LtdSeparable fastening fabric
AU246968A * Title not available
GB1140576A * Title not available
SE310284B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4067609 *Nov 22, 1976Jan 10, 1978Johnson & JohnsonHeadrest cover fastening device
US4322875 *Mar 31, 1980Apr 6, 1982Minnesota Mining And Manfacturing CompanyTwo strip materials used for forming fasteners
US4454183 *Oct 20, 1983Jun 12, 1984Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyStrip material with heat-formed hooked heads
US4870721 *Mar 7, 1989Oct 3, 1989Nathan CohenMulti-prong surface connector
US4931343 *Jan 22, 1988Jun 5, 1990Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySheet material used to form portions of fasteners
US5407439 *Jun 1, 1994Apr 18, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-layer female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
US5470417 *Oct 11, 1994Nov 28, 1995The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making multi-layer female component for refastenable fastening device
US5569233 *Dec 20, 1994Oct 29, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-layer female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
US5614232 *Feb 28, 1996Mar 25, 1997Minnesota Mining And ManufacturingMethod of making an interengaging fastener member
US5761775 *Oct 17, 1996Jun 9, 1998Legome; Mark J.Mushroom and loop material closure system for high shear strength and low peel strength applications
US5852855 *Dec 2, 1996Dec 29, 1998Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyDisposable diaper with fastener
US6625851Oct 31, 2000Sep 30, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Fastening system having vertical and horizontal engagement
US6637079May 15, 1995Oct 28, 2003The Procter & Gamble CompanyMulti-layer female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
US6849142Oct 19, 1993Feb 1, 2005The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of making multi-layer female component for refastenable fastening device
US7275290Jul 13, 2004Oct 2, 2007Velcro Industries B.V.Touch fasteners
US8876875 *Feb 21, 2014Nov 4, 2014Snapbac, LlcThermal therapy apparel
US20050177986 *Jul 13, 2004Aug 18, 2005Clarner Mark A.Touch fasteners
US20120046670 *Jan 26, 2010Feb 23, 2012Johannes EnglWound cleansing assembly
USRE38652Jun 4, 1997Nov 16, 2004Velcro Industries B.V.Hook for hook and loop fasteners
DE3306757A1 *Feb 25, 1983Sep 29, 1983Minnesota Mining & MfgBandmaterial mit unter waermeeinwirkung angeformten hakeneinrichtung
EP0211564A2 *Jul 23, 1986Feb 25, 1987Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanySheet material used to form portions of fasteners
WO1982000850A1 *Aug 25, 1981Mar 18, 1982Mitex Glasfiber AbInsect screen
WO1982002480A1 *Jan 21, 1982Aug 5, 1982Griffith John DaltonTape fastener
WO1992020250A1 *May 4, 1992Nov 26, 1992The Procter & Gamble CompanyMultilayer female component for refastenable fastening device and method of making the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/450
International ClassificationA44B18/00
Cooperative ClassificationA44B18/0023
European ClassificationA44B18/00D