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Publication numberUS3710291 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 9, 1973
Filing dateNov 17, 1971
Priority dateNov 18, 1970
Also published asDE2158571A1
Publication numberUS 3710291 A, US 3710291A, US-A-3710291, US3710291 A, US3710291A
InventorsNicoud G
Original AssigneeSermag
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Permanent magnet
US 3710291 A
Abstract
A permanent magnet is described, which is particularly adapted for use in stators of electric motors or in attraction devices which should present an involved attracting surface, together with high magnetic performance. A plurality of small ferrites pieces are stuck, closely juxtaposed on a flexible sheet of magnetic or non magnetic material. Preferably, the supporting sheet is non magnetic, and the ferrite pieces have a magnetization pattern which alternates the polarities according to a predetermined pitch.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 Nicoud Jan. 9, 1973 i541 PERMANENT MAGNET [7S] inventor: Gilbert Nieoud, Allevard, France {73] Assignee: Societe d'Etudes et de Recherches Magnetlques "Sermlg" ['22] Filed: Nov. I7, 1971 [2]] Appl. No.: 199,647

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Nov. 18, 1970 France ..704l30i [52] US. Cl ..33$/306, 3l0/l54 [5i] lnt.Cl. "H0" 7/02 [58] Field of Search ..335/285, 302, 303, 306;

[5 6] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,958,019 l0/l960 Scholten etal ..335/285 Roode ..33S/303 Eherline et al l i r .3 ltl/i54 X Primary Examiner-- (ieurgi: Harris Attorney-Cushmun, Durhy & (ushmim ABSTRACT A permanent magnet is described, which is particularly adapted for use in stators of electric motors or in attraction devices which should present an involved attracting surface, together with high magnetic performance. A plurality of small ferrites pieces are stuck, closely juxtaposed on a flexible sheet of magnetic or non magnetic material. Preferably, the supporting sheet is non magnetic, and the ferrite pieces have a magnetization pattern which alternates the polarities according to a predetermined pitch.

8 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures PERMANENT MAGNET The present invention relates to permanent magnets and, more particularly, to magnets made of a material having a high coercive force, from which the ferrites are a preferred example.

In a number of applications, conventional magnets obtained by pressing a ferrite powder in a forming die, in the presence of an orientating magnetic field, and then by sintering the resulting piece at a high temperature, have serious disadvantages. For instance, in a motor stator, the conventional magnets, shaped as comparatively thin ring portions with radial magnetization, usually termed tiles" are difficult to build with a large angular span, or with a thickness which is comparatively small with respect to the stator diameter. The radial orientation of the field is not always perfect. The tile" is deformed by sintering and a subsequent machining is necessary. Special pressing tools should be provided for each stator size.

In the above application and also in the manufacture of magnets, the attractive force of which will be used for various purposes, for instance insulating closing devices or fixing devices, use has been made in prior art of a permanent magnet material usually termed "magnetic rubber."

This material has been disclosed in French Pat. Specification No. 1,135,734 filed on Nov. 24, 1955 by the firm Tesla Narodin Podnik." It consists of an elastic binder mixed with ferrite powder. It has the property of adhering, due to its elasticity, to plane or profiled surfaces. It is adapted, moreover, to be subsected to various types of magnetization.

However, due to the binder, its magnetic characteristics are lower than those of a conventional ferrite magnet. The (BH) max product there of is for instance between 1.3 and 1.8, as compared to between 2.5 and 3.5 for the tiles and consequently, the use of such a material for manufacturing certain types of stators is prohibited.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a permanent magnet which has substantially the same magnetic properties as the conventional ferrite magnets, while possessing at the same time a good flexibility of pliancy which affords the manufacture of stator of various sizes and of attraction devices the surfaces of which is not necessarily plane. Such a magnet will combine the advantages of both the conventional magnets and the magnetic rubber, without having their drawbacks.

Permanent magnets are priorly known which combine a plurality of piece of an Alnico type alloy fixed to a support. However, the support is a rigid yoke sintered at the same time as the pieces. When it is desired to deform the support, for instance for shaping the magnet into a ring, the rigidity should be lowered by opering out notches in the support. This does not provide a magnet having the same flexibility as a magnetic rubber and adapted for the same kind of applications.

In accordance with the present invention, a permanent magnet comprising a plurality of pieces made of hard magnetic material fastened to a supporting member and magnetized in a direction substantially at right angles with said supporting member, has the supporting member made of at least one thin flexible sheet on which the said pieces are stuck.

In a first embodiment, the said sheet is made of a non magnetic material, the pieces being made of ferrite and having a magnetization which alternates with a given pitch.

In a second embodiment, all the pieces are magnetized so as to present the same polarity along their contact surface with the supporting member and the latter may then be indifferently made from a magnetic or non magnetic material.

These and other objects of this invention will become apparent from the following description.

In the accompanying drawings FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a permanent magnet according to the invention FIG. 2 is a plan view showing two such magnets mounted in a stator arrangement and,

FIG. 3 shows a portion of a magnet with alternate poles.

There is shown on FIG. 1 a comparatively pliant supporting member 1, for instance made of a steel ribbon or sheet of other metal, such as aluminum or brass, or even paper or other material, either magnetic or not. A layer of glue 2 affords fastening of magnetic pieces, advantageously made of ferrite, cut out of a massive block.

In the illustrated embodiment, a plurality of small juxtaposed bars, 3, 4, 5 having for instance a length of 2 cm, a width of 7 mm and a thickness of 4 mm will be adapted for manufacturing a stator tile. It will be understood that the illustrated shape and arrangement of the magnetic pieces are by no way limiting, and will depend upon the desired application. For example, to provide an attraction magnetic device designed for adhering to an involved surface, the bars will be subjected to a further cutting operation through directions at right angle with those of the first cutting operation. This will render the arrangement deformable along two mutually perpendicular directions.

The cutting operation(s) may be effected either before or after the lay out and fastening of the magnetic pieces on their supporting member, while the magnetization in effected last of all, in a direction substantially perpendicular to the surface of the support. HO. 2 illustrates a particularly advantageous application. Reference numeral 6 is the yoke of a motor stator, 7 and 8 two tiles made of ferrite bars stuck on two steelribbons (7a and 80 respectively), in accordance with the technique illustrated in H0. 1. All the bars of a same tile are magnetized radially with the same polarity and the magnetic sheets and act as pole pieces. The "tiles" thus obtained are adapted to the design of stators of various diameters. They may have as small a thickness as desired, with respect to the stator diameter. No machining tool is necessary and the manufacture is quite simple and may be automatized. For example, for use in a DC. motor having a 40 mm diameter rotor and with a strontium ferrite cut out into bars having the above mentioned dimensions, tiles have been manufacture in accordance with the above disclosed technique, having a span angle of 140 and providing a flux of 28,500 Maxwell in the rotor with a conventional massive tile made of strontium ferrite, the maximum span angle which may be obtained is with a flux of 29,500 Maxwell through the rotor. With a tile made of magnetic rubber, a span angle of may be obtained,

but the flux through the rotor then does not exceed 19,500 Maxwell.

For A 55 mm diameter rotor, a tile made of bars of 6,5 X U X 26 mm made as disclosed hereinabove may have a span angle as high as 130 and generate a flux of 43,000 Maxwell through the rotor. Such a flux is of the same order of magnitude as that which should be generated by a conventional massive tile, but the latter could not be designed with a span angle exceeding l20. However, a tile made of magnetic rubber could have a span angle as high as 140, but with a flux not exceeding 30,000 Maxwell.

It is finally seen that the composite tile of the invention substantially combines the advantages of the two prior art types of tiles, yet without having these drawbacks.

For motors of larger size it would be possible to manufacture the tiles by stiching the ferrite bars on a paper support, shaping the resulting assembly, placing it in a mould and pouring a resin, such as Araldite," about the assembly. The resin will penetrate into the interstices between the bars and, when hardening, will fix the shape of the assembly. The paper support will then be removed and a pole piece thicker than that the said support will be glued in place of it.

On FIG. 3, there is shown a portion of a permanent magnet made of small ferrite bars, such as 9 to 17, bonded with a glue 18 on a sheet of non magnetic material 19, for instance paper. Bars 9-11 have for instance their North pole engaging the support 18-19, and also the bars -17, while the bars 12 14 have their South pole engaging the support 18 19. It results that the magnetization pattern alternates with a pitch of for instance three bars, such a permanent magnet may be used in the design of a magnetic attraction device or a magnetic coupling.

What is claimed is:

1. A permanent magnet stator tile apparatus comprising: a supporting member; a plurality of pieces of magnetic material attached to said supporting member at a relatively narrow bottom face thereof each of said pieces of magnetic material aligned relatively closely spaced to the next succeeding piece and magnetized in a direction substantially at right angles therewith, wherein each of said pieces has a thickness dimension substantially smaller than its height; the support member comprises at least one thin and flexible sheet on which the same magnetic pieces are stuck.

2. The permanent magnet stator tile apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein the said magnetic pieces have a magnetization pattern which is uniform, the said support being then made ofa magnetic mater-ial.

3. The permanent magnet as described in claim 1, wherein the said magnetic pieces are shaped as parallelepipeds each having its height dimension at right angles with the support surface, the interval between any two adjacent parallelepipeds being small as compared to the thickness dimension of the parallelepiped,

4. The permanent magnet as described in claim 1, wherein the said magnetic pieces are ferrite material shaped as parallelepipeds, and stuck to said flexible member comprised of a metal ribbon forming a pole piece and shaped as at least a section ofa comparatively thin ring with radial magnetization.

5. The permanent magnetic stator tile apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein said magnetic pieces are ferrite material shaped as parallelepipeds having a length dimension substantially transverse of said support member, a thickness dimension substantially tangent thereto and a height dimension substantially normal thereto said pieces being magnetized in a direction substantially perpendicular with said support member, wherein each of said pieces are separated by a distance substantially less than its thickness dimension at the point of contact with the support means, and each piece of magnetic material is oriented so as to produce a magnetic field of one polarity in the stator tile assembly.

6. The apparatus as described in claim 5, further in cluding the stator assembly of selected inner diameter for supporting each stator tile apparatus forming a pole piece shaped as a section ofa comparatively thin ring.

7. The apparatus as described in claim 1, wherein the pieces are lined in a row having their longest side adjacent to each other for a selected number of pieces and spacing between each piece is relatively narrow compared to the thickness of the lower face attached to the support member.

8. The apparatus as described in claim 1 further including a stator member for supporting an opposite narrow face of each of said pieces within an annular opening thereof, thereof said plurality of pieces and their support member forming a pole piece shaped as a section of a relatively thin ring with radial magnetization.

Patent Citations
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US3173066 *Jun 22, 1961Mar 9, 1965Gen Motors CorpMagnetic sealing strip
US3368275 *Jul 3, 1962Feb 13, 1968Syncro CorpCasting, machining, and assembling a magnetic motor ring structure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4002937 *Jul 3, 1975Jan 11, 1977Dickey-John CorporationMagnetic sensing device
US4080542 *Jun 26, 1975Mar 21, 1978Photocircuits Division Of Kollmorgen CorporationHigh density flux magnetic circuit
US4451811 *Sep 27, 1982May 29, 1984Litton Systems, Inc.Magnet structure
US4599826 *Mar 5, 1984Jul 15, 1986Institut Sverkhtverdykh Materialov Akademii Naukukrainskoi SsrDevice for magnetoabrasive machining of workpieces
US4645960 *Nov 24, 1980Feb 24, 1987Litton Systems, Inc.Ferro-fluid bearing
US4834870 *Sep 4, 1987May 30, 1989Huron Valley Steel CorporationMethod and apparatus for sorting non-ferrous metal pieces
US4869811 *Jul 5, 1988Sep 26, 1989Huron Valley Steel CorporationRotor for magnetically sorting different metals
US4998034 *Sep 28, 1989Mar 5, 1991Hitachi, Ltd.Low speed high torque motor with production method
US5030344 *Jul 24, 1989Jul 9, 1991H.K. Research & Development, Inc.Magnetic fluid conditioner
US5275292 *May 18, 1992Jan 4, 1994Brugger Richard DEddy current separator
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US5682670 *Jul 12, 1993Nov 4, 1997Magnet Applications LimitedMethod for the fabrication of multipole magnets
US6903475Nov 5, 2003Jun 7, 2005Black & Decker Inc.Stator assembly with an overmolding that secures magnets to a flux ring and the flux ring to a stator housing
US6983529Apr 22, 2005Jan 10, 2006Black & Decker Inc.Stator assembly with an overmolding that secures magnets to a flux ring and the flux ring to a stator housing
US7038343Feb 22, 2002May 2, 2006Black & Decker Inc.Field assembly for a motor and method of making same
US7088024Apr 22, 2005Aug 8, 2006Black & Decker Inc.Field assembly for a motor and method of making same
US7091642Apr 22, 2005Aug 15, 2006Black & Decker Inc.Field assembly for a motor and method of making same
US7119469Apr 22, 2005Oct 10, 2006Black & Decker Inc.Stator assembly with an overmolding that secures magnets to a flux ring and the flux ring to a stator housing
US8248196 *Aug 20, 2007Aug 21, 2012Thyssenkrupp Transrapid GmbhMagnet arrangement for magnetic levitation vehicles and method for the production thereof
US8371021 *May 20, 2009Feb 12, 2013Panasonic CorporationManufacturing method of rare earth-iron ring magnet with continuous orientation controlled anisotropy
US20100218365 *May 20, 2009Sep 2, 2010Panasonic CorporationManufacturing method of rare earth-iron ring magnet with continuous orientation controlled anisotropy
WO1991001277A1 *Jul 20, 1990Feb 7, 1991H K Research & Dev IncMagnetic fluid conditioner
WO1999038175A1 *Dec 28, 1998Jul 29, 1999Frank SchirmeierFerrite core
Classifications
U.S. Classification335/306, 310/154.29, 310/154.24, 29/596, 310/154.7, 29/607, 101/389.1
International ClassificationH01F7/02, H02K23/02, H02K1/12, H02K1/17, H02K23/04
Cooperative ClassificationH02K1/17, H02K23/04, H01F7/0215
European ClassificationH02K1/17, H02K23/04, H01F7/02A1A