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Publication numberUS3710767 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1973
Filing dateAug 13, 1969
Priority dateAug 13, 1969
Publication numberUS 3710767 A, US 3710767A, US-A-3710767, US3710767 A, US3710767A
InventorsSmith R
Original AssigneeSmith R
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eight cycle twin chambered engine
US 3710767 A
Abstract
A reciprocating internal combustion engine that operates as an eight cycle twin chambered engine, in as much as the number of cycles have been determined by the number of breathing cycles pertaining to or within each cylinder. This design allows four cycles to take place in the inward combustion chamber and four cycles to take place in the outward combustion chamber of each cylinder. Thereby maintaining the breathing characteristics of a four cycle engine with the major basic difference being that this system allows the firing of each cylinder on the average of once per revolution of the crank shaft instead of once in two revolutions of the crank shaft.
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Umted States Patent 1191 1111 3,710,767 Smith 1 51 Jan. 16, 1973 1541 EIGHT CYCLE TWIN CHAMBERED 2,562,639 7/1951 P1311161 ..123/63 ENGINE 1,324,353 12/1919 JCflClClC ....l23/63 1,636,612 7/1927 N0illl.... ..123/63 1 Inventor: Robert Smith, 212 will -1 2,094,159 9/1937 141161161 ..l23/63 Mineola, NY. 11501 [22] Filed: Aug. 13, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 850,695

[52] US. Cl ..l23/63 [51] Int. Cl ..F02b 75/16 [58] Field of Search ..123/63 [56] References Cited UNlTED STATES PATENTS 869,021 10/1907 Roberts ..123/63 1,201,055 10/1916 Jones ..123/l98 1,371,550 3/1921 Eisler .......123/63 1,623,416 4/1927 Koury ..123/63 1,734,201 11/1929 Cassat... ..l23/63 1,813,328 7/1931 Stork ..l23/63 2,064,913 12/1936 Hedges ..123/63 2,317,167 4/1943 Baer ..123/63 Primary Examiner-Wendell E. Burns Attorney-Bucknam and Archer [57] ABSTRACT A reciprocating internal combustion engine that operates as an eight cycle twin chambered engine, in as much as the number of cycles have been determined by the number of breathing cycles pertaining to or within each cylinder. This design allows four cycles to take place in the inward combustion chamber and four cycles to take place in the outward combustion chamber of each cylinder. Thereby maintaining the breathing characteristics of a four cycle engine with the major basic difference being that this system allows the firing of each cylinder on the average of once per revolution of the crank shaft instead of once in two revolutions of the crank shaft.

11 Claims, 10 Drawing Figures ROBERT SMITH PATENTEUJMI 16 I973 SHEET 1 or 4 'PATENTEDJMI 16 um SHEET 2 0F 4 INVENTOR ROBERT SMITH PATENTEDJAN 16 I975 SHEET l 0F 4 IN VE NTOR ROBERT SMITH EIGHT CYCLE TWIN CHAMBERED ENGINE Field of the Invention The invention relates to the reciprocating internal combustion engine, and more particularly to the four cycle reciprocating internal combustion engine. wherein, the firing cycles include intake, compression, combustion and exhaust, within each combustion chamber and finally to the eight cycle reciprocating internal combustion engine, that consists primarily of a double acting piston within a cylinder, and a four cycle controlled combustion chamber at, and within each end of the cylinder.

Description of the Prior Art The prior art includes a variety of four cycle reciprocating internal combustion engines that convert the reciprocal motion of a piston into rotary motion of the crank shaft by use of connecting rod from piston to crank shaft and using the firing cycles of intake, compression, combustion, and exhaust, thereby making it necessary for the crank shaft to make two revolutions in order to complete the four cycles necessary to fire each cylinder once.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION It has been discovered that existing four cycle reciprocating internal combustion engines do not efficiently utilize all the design potentials possible within the four cycle engines. In particular, each piston and cylinder comprise only a single combustion chamber within each cylinder therefore delivering but one power stroke for each two revolutions of the crank shaft within a single cylinder. During the intake compression and exhaust portion of the four cycles, inertia or combustion in other cylinders is necessary to complete the turning of the crank shaft and the engine is obsorbing energy during the one and a half revolutions of the crank shaft required to produce one combustion stroke. However, this may be compensated for by using a double acting piston within each cylinder with a controlled four cycle combustion chamber on each side of the piston. With this method each cylinder shall produce one power stroke on the average of one revolution of the crank shaft instead of one power stroke on the average of two revolutions of the crank shaft. As explained herein, the engine of this invention can be used with a fuel and air mixing type carburetion or fuel injection with an appropriate ignition system. In addition, by increasing compression and adding fuel injection with necessary structural and compression allowances it can be run on diesel principles and with diesel type fuel. The engine is not limited to a specific basic structural form. In one form, the basic structure of an L head combustion chamber is used, having a double acting piston within each cylinder with a controlled four cycle combustion chamber of L head design at each end of cylinder, operated by a double cam shaft system, with or without, adjustable tappets. In another form that will be known as the eight cycle side valve in manifold system, a single cam shaft is used to control the valves in both combustion chambers within each cylinder that is also designed with a double acting piston within each cylinder and four cycle controlled combustion chamber at and within each end of cylinder. The rocker arms used in this design maybe adjustable or non-adjustable.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine.

'Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating intemal combustion engine with one or more cylinders; with double acting piston within each cylinder; having a thrust rod attached to the piston at one end the other end of thrust rod passing through the crank case cylinder head by way of piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly and linking to connecting rod with wrist pin, with the opposite end of connecting rod linked to crank shaft. The cylinder having a double acting piston within and cylinderheads at each end of cylinder, with at least one intake and one exhaust valve opening in to each end of cylinder forms two controlled four cycle combustion chambers, one at and within each end of cylinder. Each valve being operated by cam action from cam on cam shaft. Cam shaft shall be rotated and constructed in a fashion to allow the inward and outward combustion chambers to be coordinated with each other and any number of other cylinders included within the engine. The cam action of cam shaft shall produce the coordinated action of the four cycles of, intake, compression, combustion, and exhaust, within the combustion chamber at each end of all cylinders. The combustion shall be initiated by at least one spark plug in each combustion chamber, if needed, and spark shall be distributed and coordinated by use of distributor or distributors along with necessary wireing with distributor or distributors having centrifugal or vacuum advance or a combination of both if needed.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein, it is possible to increase the horsepower and torque up to percent or more without increasing the bore and stroke, compression ratio, or number of cylinders. At the same time maintaining what is considered to be the most desirable or recommended operating R.P.M. speed range of the engine with particular consideration being given to friction heat and reciprocal motion, governed by revolutions per minute and thereby maintaining the most desirable breathing conditions and characteristics resulting in a more efficient fuel consumption rate. Also maintaining the four cycle breathing characteristics of intake, compression, combustion, and exhaust, within each combustion chamber, while increasing the overall weight and size of comparable conventional engines having but one combustion chamber per cylinder, preferably by as little as 5 percent and preferably no more than 50 percent.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein each cylinder can produce two combustion strokes with a single revolution of the crank shaft. However, the crank shaft must make two revolutions to complete the four cycles of intake, compression, combustion, and exhaust within each combustion chamber at and within each end of cylinder thereby completing an average of one combustion stroke with each revolution of the crank shaft within each cylinder.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating intemal combustion engine wherein each cylinder can produce one combustion stroke with each revolution of the crank shaft. However, the crank shaft must make two revolutions to complete the four cycles of intake, compression, combustion and exhaust within the combustion chambers at and within each end of cylinder thereby producing one combustion stroke with each revolution of the crank shaft within each cylinder.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein each cylinder may be fired on the average of once per each revolution of the crank shaft and either the inward or the outward combustion chamber within each cylinder may be fired first, at the same time maintaining four cycle breathing of intake, compression, combustion and exhaust within both combustion chambers at and within each end of cylinder.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein the in line or straight designed engines may be designed starting with a single cylinder and may be enlarged by the adding of one cylinder at a time to fulfill each particular engines requirements or design specifications instead of adding cylinders in groups of two as is normally the case.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein the piston travel is 50 percent less than in conventional four cycle engines that have but one combustion chamber per cylinder with both engines having the same bore and stroke, compression ratio, and having same number of cylinders. At the same time maintaining four cycle breathing of intake, compression, combustion and exhaust within both combustion chambers at and within the end of each cylinder, and both engines maintaining the same number of combustion cycles per minute.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein the wear caused by friction on piston, piston rings, cylinders, wrist pins, connecting rod bearings, main bearings another principal parts of the engine is from 50 percent to 80 percent less than in conventional four cycle engines having butone combustion chamber per cylinder and having the same bore and stroke, compression ratio and having same number of cylinders, with both engines maintaining the same number of combustion cycles per minute.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating intemal combustion engine having an increase in cubic displacement of up to 90 percent or more as compared to the cubic displacement of conventional four cycle engines that have but one combustion chamber per cylinder and are of the same bore and stroke, compression ratio and having same number of cylinders, at the same time maintaining the four cycle breathing of intake, compression, combustion and exhaust within the combustion chambers at and within each end of cylinder or cylinders.

Another object of the invention is to provide an im proved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein the engine may be allowed to run on either the inward or outward combustion chambers, should mechanical difficulties occur in either the inward or outward half of cylinder or cylinders within the engine,

or should it be determined to be a matter of safety, or preventing damage to the engine, or simply the desire to operate at reduced power the half of the engine that is selected may be removed from the tasksof developing power by simply turning off ignition and fuel and compression relief or release may be applied on engines so equipped on the inward or outward side of the engine as desired. The above mentioned procedure may be practiced without detriment to the engine.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating intemal combustion engine wherein a single manifold will contain the intake and exhaust manifold duets from combustion chamber to exhaust system and from carburetor or carburetors to combustion chamber. This manifold shall support or contain the carburetor or carburetors the valves and valve assembly, cam shaft and cam shaft support brackets rocker arms and valve cover, also the cam shaft drive gear and any nuts, bolts, washers or studs or any other parts necessary to complete and secure the assembly. This manifold is temperature controlled by means of a fluid within, and will be thermostatically and restrictor controlled within its self. This assembly may contain compression relief or release control. The above mentioned applies to the side valve in manifold engine.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating intemal combustion engine wherein a piston thrust rod assembly has been devised. This assembly consists of a double acting piston with thrust rod attached to one end. This piston assembly has metered forced fed lubrication that shall lubricate piston wall, piston rings and cylinder wall. The face at each end of piston may be flat, or the two faces may be contoured and may protrude into the combustion chambers.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein the side valve and manifold design and configuration shall be used as follows: a cylinder having a double acting piston within with a thrust rod. attached to one end of piston with thrust rod passing through crank case cylinder head by way of piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly and linking the connecting rod with wrist pin, other end of connecting 'rod linked to crank shaft. The side valve in manifold engine consists of: engine block with cylinder head over each end of cylinder with side value in manifold assembly completing both combustion chambers the manifold shall contain at least one intake and one exhaust valve opening into each combustion chamber. Valves shall be controlled preferably by a single cam shaft actuated by rocker arms. The manifold shall contain intake and exhaust ducts and all other parts and configurations as outlined in the preferred embodiment.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating internal combustion engine wherein a seal has been devised to seal the inward'compression chamber around piston thrust rod to prevent the escape of gases during the compression or exhaust cycles or reduce to a safe minimum level the seepage of gases between thrust rod and inner cylinder head at all times by means of a piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly. This assembly has metered forced fed lubrication throughout and lubricants thrust rod.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved reciprocating intemal combustion engine wherein the double L head design is used that consists of a cylinder with a double acting piston within. Piston having thrust rod attached to one end of piston other end thrust rod passing through the crank case cylinder head by way of piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly linking to connecting rod with wrist pin, other end of connecting rod linked to crank shaft with a four cycle controlled combustion chamber at each end of cylinder with both chambers taking the form of L head design and configuration.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS-PART The following one digit figures describe and pertain to the eight cycle twin chambered engine of the side valve in manifold design embodied in this invention.

FIG. 1 is a view illustrating the side valve and manifold engine of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a partial cross sectional view taken along the line 22 in FIG. 1 to best illustrate the location of cylinder, combustion chambers, piston and thrust rod assembly, valves and valve assembly, intake and exhaust ducts and cylinder heads that comprise the twin combustion chambers in side valve in manifold design of this invention.

FIG. 3 is a partial cross sectional drawing illustrating the method of linking piston thrust rod to connecting rod with wrist pin and linking other end of connecting rod to crank shaft and showing the above mentioned within crank case and crank case attached to engine block.

FIG. 4 is a detailed drawing illustrating the piston and thrust rod assembly number 49.

FIG. 5 is a detailed drawing illustrating the compression seal and bearing assembly number 25.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS-PART The following three digit figures describe and pertain to the eight cycle twin chambered engine of the double L head design embodied in this invention.

FIG. 101 is a view illustrating the double L head engine of this invention.

FIG. 102 is a partial cross sectional view taken along the line 102l02 in FIG. 101 to best illustrate the location of cylinder combustion chambers piston and thrust rod assembly valves and valve assembly intake and exhaust ducts and cylinder heads that comprise the twin combustion chambers in the double L head design of this invention.

FIG. 103 is a partial cross sectional drawing illustrating the method of linking piston thrust rod to connecting rod with wrist pin and linking other end of connecting rod to crank shaft and showing the above mentioned within crank case and crank case attached to engine block.

FIG. 104 is a detailed drawing illustrating the piston and thrust rod assembly number 142.

FIG. is a detailed drawing illustrating compression seal and bearing assembly number 1 19.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTPART 1 FIGS. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 are illustrations of side valve in manifold. FIG. 2 is a partial cross sectional view taken along the line 22 of FIG. 1 it will be noted that this figure is not actually along a straight line but includes an off set or joggle to illustrate the cylinder, piston, valves, valve springs and intake passages etc. in the same view. Note 12 may be referred to as inner cylinder head or crank case cylinder head.

The following is shown in FIG. 2 the engine block 10 with outer cylinder head 11 attached to engine block 10 and the inner crank case cylinder head 12 attached to engine block 10. The side valve in manifold assembly 13 attached to engine block 10 outer cylinder head 11 and crank case cylinder head 12 showing intake manifold ducts 14 and 15 and exhaust manifold ducts l6 and 17 showing end view of cam shaft 18. Showing side view of rocker arms 19 and 20. Showing cam shaft support bracket 21. Showing valve cover assembly 22. Showing valve guides 45 and 46. Showing valve springs 47 and 48. Cylinder 39 is shown with piston assembly 27 within, and piston thrust rod 26 is attached to piston assembly 27 and passing through crank case cylinder head 12 by way of piston thrust rod compression seal and' bearing assembly 25. Shown installed in outer cylinder head 11 is spark plug 23. Shown installed in inner cylinder head 12 is spark plug 24. The outer cylinder head gasket 33 is between outer cylinder head 1 1 and engine block 10. The inner cylinder head gasket 34 is between the engine block 10 and the crank case cylinder head 12. Manifold gasket 35 is between engine block 10 the outer cylinder head 11 the inner cylinder head 12 and the side valve in manifold assembly 13.

Valve cover gasket 36 is between side valve in manifold assembly 13 and valve cover assembly 22.

The passages for circulating temperature control cooling fluid are 40, 41, 42, 43 and 44 all passages are directly or indirectly connected. Piston and thrust rod assembly 49 consists of piston thrust rod 26, piston assembly 27 and piston assembly 27 consists of piston rings 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, piston body 55, piston end plate 56 and piston thrust transfer flange 57.

Having outlined, named and numbered most of the components that make up the combustion chambers and describing their relationship to one another I shall outline their mechanical functions and relationship.

As shown in FIG. 2 the piston thrust rod assembly 25 is positioned with piston assembly 27 in cylinder 39 with piston thrust rod 26 passing through piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly 25, with outer end of thrust rod shown in FIG. 3 linking to one 12 with at least one intake and one exhaust valve opening into each of the combustion chambers 60 and 61 at each end of cylinder.

The intakeand exhaust valves are controlled by rocker arms that pivot on rocker arm shafts 58 and 59 and are accuated by cam on cam shaft 18 designed to rotate and coordinate both combustion chambers 60 and 61 within this cylinder and all other cylinders within the engine. This coordination shall produce a controlled four cycle combustion chamber at each end of all cylinders. The cycles shall be intake, compression, combustion and exhaust.

Each cylinder shall have at least one spark plug'in each combustion chamber if needed and spark shall be distributed and coordinated by use of distributor or distributors along with necessary wiring with distributor having centrifugal or vacuum advance or a'combination of both if needed.

All intake ducts into the engine shall be by way of side valve in manifold assembly and shall first flow through carburetor or carburetors that shall be aligned with outer end of intake manifold duct or ducts and shall be secured to side valve in manifold assembly. The above mentioned carburetor or carburetors shall be fuel air mixing type devices. Should fuel injection be desired the injection system may be used as a substitute for fuel air mixing type carboration, and where gasoline (or fuels of this type) are used the engine may be run in conjunction with an ignition system. In the event that the design is altered to accomodate the use of diesel type fuel ignition systems may be deleted and engine operated with fuel injection along with pumps, governors and all other controls normally required to complete an engine operating on diesel design and principle. And all engines, gasoline, or diesel, fuel injection or fuel air mixing type carboration may have compression relief or release mechanism incorporated with the design; Piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly. As shown in FIG. 4, housing 62, bearing 63, compression rings 64, 65, 66 ring retainers 67, 68, 69. The housing shall contain three ring retainers 67, 68, 69 each with a compression ring inside, secured by thrust rod bearing'63 which shall be secured by pressed fit or threads. The housing itself 62 may be installed in crank case cylinder head by either pressed fit or threads. This assembly shall have metered force fed lubrication that shall lubricate bearing rings and retainers within this assembly and at the same time shall lubricate piston thrust rod.

PISTON AND THRUST ROD ASSEMBLY The piston shall have metered force fed lubrication that shall lubricate outer wall of piston, piston rings and cylinder wall. The source of this lubrication shall be taken from the engines internal pressurized lubricating system, at the connecting rod journal either by way of internal passage or external tubing attached to connecting rod. This passage shall be routed around or through wrist pin to and through piston thrust rod into piston body and finally to piston rings that shall in turn lubricate inner cylinder wall and outer wall of the piston and piston rings. The faces at each endof piston may be flat or the two faces may be contoured and may protrude into the combustion chambers. Note: All two digit numbers apply tothe side valve in manifold design of the eight cycle engine. However certain components of this design may be inter-changeable with the double L head design.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT-PART 2 FIG. 102 TheDouble L Head Design: FIG. 102 is a partial cross sectional view taken along line 102-402 of FIG. 101. It will be noted that this figure is not along a straight line but includes an off set or joggle to illustrate the cylinder, piston, valves, valve springs, valve 7 lifters, intake passages, cam shafts etc. in the same view. Note: 112 may be referred to as inner cylinder head or crank case cylinder head. The following is shown in FIG. 102.

The engine block with out cylinder head 11 1 attached to engine block 110 and crank case cylinder head 112 attached to engine block 110, and showing end view of cam shafts 113 and 114 installed in engine block 110. Valve cover assembly 115'and 116 attached to engine block 110. Spark plug 117 shown installed in outer cylinder head 111. Spark plug 118 installed in inner cylinder head 112. Piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly 119 installed in inner cylinder head 112. Piston thrust rod assembly 142, with piston thrust rod 120 passing through inner cylinder head 112, by way of piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly 119 with piston assembly 121 attached to piston thrust rod 120. Piston assembly 121 he stalled in cylinder 133. Valves 125 and 126, valve guides 138 and 139, valve springs 140 and 141 are shown installed in engine block 1 10. The outer cylinder head gasket 127 is installed between outer cylinder head 11'1 andengineblock 110.The inner cylinder head gasket 128 is installed between inner cylinder head 112 and engine block 110. Valve cover gasket .129 and 1 30 are installed between valve coversllS and 1 16 and engine block 1 10. Passages for circulating temperature control cooling fluid 134, 135, 136, 137 all passages are directly or indirectly connected as shown in engine block 1 10 Outer cylinder head 111 and inner cylinder head 112. Piston thrust rod assembly 142 consists of piston thrust rod 120 and piston assembly 121. Piston assembly 121 consists of piston rings 143, 144, 145, 146,147 and 148. Piston body 149, piston end plate 150, piston thrust transfer flange 151. Shown at outer end of cylinder is combustion chamber 152. Shown at inner end of cylinder is combustion chamber 153. FIG. '103 shall show piston thrust rod 120 linked to connecting rod 123 with wrist pin 122. The opposite end of connecting rod is linked to crank shaft 124. Having outlined, named and numbered most of the components that make up the combustion chambers and cylinders and describing their relationship to one another I, shall outline their mechanical functions and relationships.

As shown in FIG. 102 the piston thrust rod assembly 142 is positioned with piston assembly 121 in cylinder 133, with piston thrust rod 142 passing through crank case cylinder head by way of piston thrust rod compression seal and bearing assembly 119 with outer end of thrust rod shown in FIG. 103 linking to one end of connecting rod 123 the other end of connecting rod is linked to crank shaft 124. Shown in FIG. 102 piston assembly 121 in cylinder 133, with outer cylinder head 111 secured over end of cylinder 133 and crank case cylinder head 112 secured over crank case end of cylinder 133 with one intake and one exhaust valve opening into each of the combustion chambers 152 and 153 at each end of cylinder 133. The intake and exhaust valves are controlled by cam shafts 113 and 114, the cams on cam shafts 113 and 114 are designed to rotate and coordinate both combustion chambers 152 and 153 within this cylinder and all other cylinders within this engine. This coordination shall produce a controlled four cycle combustion chamber at each end of all cylinders. The four cycles shall be intake, compression, combustion and exhaust. Each cylinder shall have at least one spark plug in each combustion chamber if needed and spark shall be distributed and coordinated by use of distributor or distributors along with necessary wireing with distributor or distributors having centrifugal or vacuum advance or a combination of both if needed. All intake ducts into the engine shall be by way of intake manifold and shall first pass through carburetor or carburetors that shall be aligned with outer end of intake manifold duct or ducts and shall be secured to intake manifold. The above mentioned carburetor or carburetors shall be fuel air mixing type devices. Should fuel injection be desired the injection system may be used as substitute for fuel air mixing type carboration, and where gasoline (or fuels of this type) are used the engine may be run in conjunction with an ignition system. In the event that the design is altered to accomodate the use of diesel type fuel ignition may be deleted and engine operated with fuel injection along with pumps, governers and all other controls normally required to complete an engine operating on diesel design and principle. And all engines gasoline, or fuel injection or fuel air mixing type carboration may have compression relief or release mechanism incorporated with the design.

As shown in FIG. 103, housing 158, bearing 159 compression rings 160, 161, 162 ring retainers 163, 164, 165. The housing 158 shall contain three ring retainers 163, 164, 165 each with a compression ring inside secured by thrust rod bearing which shall be secured by pressed fit or threads or any other suitable method. The housing 158 itself may be installed in crank case cylinder head by either pressed fit or threads or any other suitable method. This assembly shall have metered force fed lubrication that shall lubricate bearing 'rings, and retainers within this assembly and at the same time shall lubricate piston thrust rod.

Piston and thrust rod assembly: The piston shall have metered force fed lubrication that shall lubricate outer wall of piston, cylinder wall and piston rings. The source of this lubrication shall be taken from the engines internal pressurized lubricating system, at the connecting rod journal either by way of internal passage or external tubing attached to connecting rod. This passage shall be routed around or through wrist pin to and through piston thrust rod into piston body and finally to piston rings that shall in turn lubricate inner cylinder wall and outer wall of the piston and piston rings. The faces at each end of piston may be flat or the two faces may be contoured and may protrude into the combustion chambers. Note: All three digit numbers apply to the double L head design of the eight cycle engine, however certain components of this design may be inter-changeable with the eight cycle side valve in manifold design.

In the preceding material, an engine has been described which operates in accordance with unique principles to yield considerably more horsepower and torque than is available from conventional four cycle engines having but one combustion chamber per cylinder and being of comparable size and weight. Also having same boar stroke and number of cylinders and turning same number of R.P.M. A particular illustrative embodiment has been shown. It is appreciated that many modifications in structure, arrangement, proportions and elements may be made by those skilled in the art, without departing from the principles taught herein. The following claims are intended to cover and embrace any of such modifications within the limits of the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An internal combustion engine comprising at least one cylinder with a reciprocating piston disposed therein, said piston having faces at opposite ends thereof to complete the formation of combustion chambers at opposite ends of said cylinder, said engine having a detachable manifold portion and a valve assembly located in the manifold portion adapted to control the intake, compression, combustion, and exhaust cycles within said cylinder, said piston being of cylindrical form suited for reciprocal motion and having a plurality of axially spaced rings disposed about the circumference, each ring being in a groove thereof and each ring being in sealing contact with the cylinder walls and piston body, a plurality of internal lubricating ducts disposed parallel to the piston axis with short radially disposed ducts interconnecting with piston ring grooves, and the internal radial lubricating ducts in one. end of the piston interconnected to said parallelly disposed ducts and means of forced fed lubrication supplied by way of thrust rod, wrist pin and connecting rod, said piston having a generally cup-shaped body forming one face and the side walls thereof, said body containing said lubricating ducts, with an end plate forming the opposite face of the piston and said end plate being disposed, secured and sealed within the piston body, a center bore in the face of said piston body, a threaded bore in the center of the internal side of said piston end plate, the thrust rod projecting through the bore in said face of piston body and engaged with said threaded bore of piston end plate, said piston including internally projecting cylinders on the internal sides of each face, said cylinders containing said bores and the faces of said internal cylinders being in butting contact where the thrust rod is first engaged with said threaded bore and a shoulder included on said thrust rod to contact with said one face of piston with a thrust transfer flange between piston and thrust rod rod shoulder and piston body over a larger area than thrust rod diameter would permit with said thrust transfer flange being of a material exhibiting strength characteristics exceeding those of material forming said piston body.

2. An internal combustion engine comprising at least one cylinder with a reciprocating piston disposed therein, said piston having faces at opposite ends thereof to complete the formation of combustion chambers at opposite ends of said cylinder, said engine having a detachable manifold portion and a valve assembly located in the manifold portion adapted to control the intake, compression, combustion, and exhaust cycles within said cylinder, said piston being connected via a thrust rod to a connecting rod with a wrist pin and the other end of the connecting rod being connected to a crank shaft to convert reciprocal motion of the piston to rotary motion of the crank shaft and a compression seal and bearing assembly to support, guide and seal said thrust rod when bearing and seal assembly is disposed, sealed and secured within the crank case cylinder head and said bearing and seal assembly comprising a cup-shaped housing, a plurality of compression rings and ring retainers seated within said housing and compression rings in sealing contact with said thrust rod and ring retainers,with a bearing axially displaced within said housing and with bearing disposed, sealed and secured within said housing to provide bearing support for said thrust rod and having means of metered forced feed lubrication to each of said rings, ring retainers and to said bearing and thrust rod when bearing and seal assembly is disposed in crank case cylinder head and a seal and bearing assembly as defined above wherein said rings having an outside diameter substantially smaller than the inside diameter of said ring retainer and each ring being cut through one side only to form a split ring and the bore through ring retainers substantially larger than thrust rod diameter and said ring retainers having short radially disposed lubricating ducts through wall of ring retainers and said short radially disposed lubricating ducts being small enough in diameter to limit excessive flow of oil under a given pressure to the internal surface of said ring retainers and rings and to internal surface of thrust rod bearing, with radially extending lubricating ducts therethrough interconnecting with duct parallelly disposed to axis of thrust rod within bearing and seal housing and interconnected to means of forced feed lubrication when bearing and seal assembly is disposed in crank case cylinder head.

3. An internal combustion engine comprising at least one cylinder with a reciprocating piston disposed therein, said piston having faces at opposite ends thereof to complete the forming of combustion chambers at opposite ends of said cylinder, said engine having a detachable manifold portion and a valve assembly located in the manifold portion adapted to control the intake, compression, combustion, and exhaust cycles within said cylinder; a crankcase portion and crankcase pan cover portion, both being integral parts of the engine block, said crankcase portion having a large access opening to the crankshaft with a removable cover plate on the manifold side of the engine.

4. An internal combustion engine comprising at least a one cylinder with a reciprocating piston disposed therein, said piston having faces at opposite ends thereof to complete the forming of combustion chambers at opposite ends of said cylinder, said engine having a detachable manifold portion, and a valve assembly located inthe manifold portion adapted to control the intake compression, combustion and exhaust cycles within said cylinder, said manifold portion being located to one side of said cylinder and being detachable along lines substantially parallel to the axis of said cylinder, said piston being connected to a thrust rod which extends into acrank case, and said'cylinder having removable cylinder heads disposed at each end thereof, one said cylinder head being disposed within said crank case. I

5. An internal combustion engine as defined in claim 3 including a thrust rod connected to saidpiston and a compression seal and bearing assembly through which said thrust rod extends, said'compression seal and bearring retainers having radially 'dispos'ed'lubricating ducts interconnected through the ring retainer wall to the internal surface thereof.

6. An internal combustion engine as defined in claim 5, wherein said bearing means has at least one radially extending lubricating duct and is interconnected to said common lubricating means for metered forced fed lubrication.

7. An internal combustion engine as defined in claim 6, wherein said compression rings and retainers are assembled in adjacent axially spaced relationship and wherein the lubricating ducts within each assembly are connected to said lubricating means for forced fed lubrication.

8. An internal combustion engine as defined in claim 3, wherein said piston has a body of cylindrical form and has a plurality of axially spaced rings disposed in grooves about the circumference and in sealing contact with the cylinder walls and piston body, and including a plurality of internal lubricating ducts within said piston body disposed parallel to the piston axis with short radially disposed ducts connecting said grooves, internal radial lubricating ducts in one end of the piston connected to said parallelly disposed ducts, and means for metered forced fed lubrication through said'ducts.

9. An internal combustion engine as defined in claim 8, comprising a cup-shaped body formingone face and the side walls thereof, said cup-shaped body containing said lubricating ducts, an endplate forming the op posite face of the piston, a center bore in face of the piston body, a threaded bore in the center of the internal side of said piston end plate, and a thrust rod projecting through the bore in said face of piston body and engaged with said threaded bore on the piston end plate.

10. An internal combustion engine as defined in claim 9, including internally projecting cylinders on the internal sides of each face, said internal cylinders containing said bores and the faces of said internal cylinders being in contact when said thrust rod is engaged with said threaded bore and when said piston end plate is sealed in the open end of said cup-shaped body.

11. An internal combustion engine as defined in claim 10, including a shoulder on said thrust rod in contact with said one face of the piston with a thrust transfer flange between the piston and thrust rod

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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US4274327 *Feb 16, 1979Jun 23, 1981Olsgaard Orin JExpansible chamber device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification123/63
International ClassificationF02B75/02, F02B1/04, F02B1/00, F02B75/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02B1/04, F02B2075/027, F02B75/002, F02B75/021
European ClassificationF02B75/00B, F02B75/02C