Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3710817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1973
Filing dateFeb 3, 1970
Priority dateFeb 3, 1970
Publication numberUS 3710817 A, US 3710817A, US-A-3710817, US3710817 A, US3710817A
InventorsW Lorenzen
Original AssigneeAnzen Prod
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multiple solutes additive apparatus
US 3710817 A
Abstract
Apparatus for adding solute to a liquid such as swimming pool water in which a first mixing tank is supported on a second mixing tank. The first mixing tank is adapted to receive circulating water and metered amounts of either liquid or solid additives such as chlorine. The first tank has adjustable overflow means connecting to the second mixing tank from which second tank a float-controlled valve releases the water and solute mixture to the suction side of a venturi or a pump. The first mixing tank has means for receiving solid additives in either cake or granular form and also adapts to liquid additive containers with a drip control outlet.
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Lorenzen 541 MULTIPLE SOLUTES ADDITIVE APPARATUS [58] Field of Search...137/268, 575, 576, 577.5, 411, 137/425; 23/267 E, 267 F, 272.7, 272.8, 267.4, 272, 311, 312

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,418,845 6/1922 S'tetson 137/425 1,459,486 6/1923 Whitney et al. ..137/424 X 2,204,998 6/1940 Ryan et al 137/411 X 3,472,425 10/1969 Booth et a1. ..137/411 X 2,760,820 3/1956 Cirese ..l37/268 X 3,094,134 6/1963 Currie ..l37/268 X :11 3,710,817 1 1 Jan. 16, 1973 Primary Examiner-Henry T. Klinksiek Assistant Examiner-Robert- J. Miller Attorney-Wm. Jacquet Gribble [57] ABSTRACT Apparatus for adding solute to a liquid such as swimming pool water in which a first mixing tank is supported on a second mixing tank. The first mixing tank is adapted to receive circulating water and metered amounts of either liquid or solid additives such as chlorine. The first tank has adjustable overflow means connecting to the second mixing tank from which second tank a float-controlled valve releases the water and solute mixture to,the suction side of a venturi or a pump. The first mixing tank has means for receiving solid additives in either cake or granular form and also adapts to liquid additive containers with a drip control outlet.

10 Claims, 7 Drawing Figures 35 T 46? VENTUR/ BYPASS P 0 0L A8 {if F l LT E R 1 NVENTOR.

A T TOR/V5 V PATENTEUJAN 16 I975 SHEET 2 BF 3 V 6x1 NR INVENTOR. WALTER C. LORENZEN ATTORNEY PATENTEDJAH 1 6 ms SHEET 3 OF 3 /79 WF/G. 7.

I N VEN TOR.

ATTORNEY MULTIPLE SOLUTES ADDITIVE APPARATUS RELATED APPLICATIONS This application is related to my copending patent applications Ser. No. 768,729 filed Oct. 19, 1968, now US. Pat. No. 3,595,395 and entitled Automatic Chlorinators for Swimming Pools and Ser. No. 809,605 filed Mar. 24, I969 and entitled Soluble Granule Feeder, abandoned in favor of continuationin-part application Ser. No. 73,564 filed Sept. 18, 1970, now Patent No. 3,626,972 and entitled Soluble Granule Feeders.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The invention relates to apparatus introducing additives into a liquid stream, and more particularly to apparatus in which various types of either solid or liquid additives may be introduced into the liquid stream, such as the recirculating water of a swimming pool, through the same mixing tanks. Conventional chlorinating equipment is incapable of adapting to the various types of additive chlorine presently in use. Several costly devices have been marketed, but their capacity for accepting the additive is limited to one of the solid granules of chlorine, the solid chlorine briquets or chlorine in liquid form. An additional problem is the damage from the strong chlorine concentration resulting from the direct addition of largely undiluted chlorine to the stream flowing through the pump and filter, like consequent chemical deterioration of those circulation components.

A further problem is the clogging of circulation equipment from the residue from the corrosive effect encountered with high chlorine concentrations.

Some devices have not been independent of pressure variables and therefore the amount of additive introduced into the system has not been consistent with usage. I

It has also been difficult to achieve additional chlorine at proper intervals, due to the varying conditions which decay or deteriorate the active chlorine within the body of pool water. Such variables as evaporation, exposure to sunlight and pump capacity have made it difficult, with present equipment, to properly regulate the chlorine concentration maintained in the circulating pool water.

Similar systems other than swimming pool systems have suffered from the lack of equipment sensitive to the varying demands of the system.

It is, therefore, among the objectives of this invention to provide apparatus for introducing a soluble additive into a liquid system which is compatible with present circulating apparatus and which is flexible enough to opening and closing the connection to the suction means. The additive may comprise soluble cakes, soluble granules or a liquid concentrate. If cakes, they may be stacked within the first mixing tank with means for controlling the liquid level therein such that the proper number of cakes is exposed to the dissolving action of the liquid within the first mixing tank. The means for meet the changing demands of additive physical form and varying volume demands of circulating systems.

SUMMARY OFTHEINVENTION v I distributing granules to the first tank may comprise a plurality of metering cups with central bottom apertures and float-actuated valve means adapted to open and close cup apertures serially in accordance with the liquid level in the first tank.

The first tank may also receive a vessel of liquid additive which has a self-contained valving means intermittently depositing additive into the first tank at a rate previously determined to be consonant with the liquid flow in the circulating system.

The metering cups may be stackable within or above the first tank and one or more of the cups may be detached to vary the number of metered increments available to the first mixing tank during one cycle of the system.

These and other advantages of the invention are apparent from the following detailed description and drawing, in which like parts in the several Figures have like reference numerals.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIG. 1 is a schematic elevation, partly in section, showing one embodiment of the invention in use with venturi-induced suction;

FIG. 2 is a schematic elevation, mostly in section, of an embodiment of the invention with pump-induced suction;

FIG. 3 is a plan section taken along line 3-3 of FIG.

FIG. 4 is an end elevation, partly in section, of an alternate embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is an end elevation, partly in section, of a further alternate embodiment;

FIG. 6 is a schematic side elevation, partly insection, of an alternate embodiment of the invention; and

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary sectional elevation of an alternate embodiment of the invention taken along a line similar to the line 7-7 of FIG. 4.

The solute additive apparatus of FIG. 1 comprises a cylindrical first mixing tank 11 and a rectangular second mixing tank 12, each of which is connected to the water circulating system of a pool 13. A bypass line 15 conducts a portion of the recirculating pool water through a check valve 17 to an elbow 18 entering into the bottom 19 of first tank 11 and through the upper wall of the second tank. Tank 11 has a removable cap 21 which retains a stack of water soluble solid chlorine briquets or cakes 23 within the tank upon bottom 19. A vertically adjustable overflow tube 25 is located in the first tank between the stack 23 and an inner tank wall 26. The tube passes downwardly through a sealing gland like the gland 28 of FIG. 6 into the interior of tank 12 in a downward extension 25A.

Intermediate its ends the adjustable tube has a window opening 29, the bottom of which determines the liquid height within the first mixing tank. Liquid entering the tank through elbow 18 exits through window 29 and tube 25 into the interior of the second mixing tank 12. An exit conduit 31 in an end 32 of the second tank near its bottom has a swinging valve 33 pivotally mounted in a bracket 34 such that a resilient valve face 35 of the valve may swing against the inner end of conduit 31 to close the conduit. The valve is float-c ontrolled, having a float member 38 atop a counterbalancing weight 39 fixed at an end of a lever arm 41 remote from a bracket pivot pin 42 of the valve assembly. In FIG. 1 the valve is shown open due to the flotation effect of liquid within the second mixing tank rising to the level of line 44. Liquid flowing through line and adjustable tube 25 into the second tank exits through open conduit 31 to a venturi 45 in a return line 46 to pool 13.

The main body of recirculating water passes through the venturi to the pool, induced by a pump 48 which feeds the recirculating water through a filter 49 and an elbow 51 from which the return line 46 extends to the venturi. Bypass line 15 extends upwardly from Tee 51 to check valve 17 and the first mixing tank.

Normally the pump is controlled by a time clock (not shown) which is set to cycle the pump in accordance with the demands of the liquid system. In a conventional swimming pool the pump is usually timed to turn on in the morning and turn off in the evening. Therefore, the soluble chlorine cakes 23 within the first mixing tank are exposed to circulating water for the period that the pump is on. The number of cakes exposed to the water at any one time is set by the setting of the adjustable overflow tube 25 and determines the concentration of chlorine delivered to the second tank. In the FIG. 1 embodiment three cakes are exposed to water within the first mixing tank since the bottom of window 29 coincides with the top of the third cake.

When the pump is shut off, either manually or by a time mechanism, the bypass line no longer supplies liquid to the first mixing tank. Check valve 17 prevents backflow toward the filter. In order to prevent further exposure of the cakes to entrained liquid, a small drain pipe 54 extends through the bottom 19 of the first mixing tank into the second mixing tank to drain the water remaining below the level of window 29 when the pump shuts off, thus preserving the relationship of chlorine delivered with respect to circulating water flow.

The second mixing tank will have a supply of water sufficient to float valve element 38 for a short period of time after the pump stops. As the liquid level lowers within the second tank, valve element 35 closes against conduit 31 and there is no flow through the venturi to the pool. Since the concentration of the chlorine solution within the second tank is determined by the exposure of the soluble cakes to water, there will be no concentration build-up within the second mixing tank when the first tank drains. Therefore, when the pump resumes on its next cycle, the liquid drawn from the second tank through the venturi will be no stronger in chlorine concentration than at any time during the pump cycle.

The embodiment of FIGS. 2 and 3 is similar in operation to the embodiment of FIG. 1. A cylindrical first mixing tank 11 is supported upon a second mixing tank 12 and is associated with a swimming pool 13. A bypass line 15 extending from a Tee 51 supplies a part of the circulating pool water through a check valve 17 to the first mixing tank. A stack 23 of soluble chlorine cakes stands within the first mixing tank. The number of cakes exposed to the dissolving action of the pool water within the first mixing tank is determined by a window 29 in an adjustable overflow tube 25 which passes slidably through the bottom 19 of the tank and depends into second mixing tank 12. A protective shroud 61 surrounds the adjustable tube 25. A stop pin 62 at the bottom of the shroud prevents downward overextension of the tube. A float valve assembly 33, similar to that described with respect to the embodiment of FIG. 1, controls the inlet of a conduit 31 extending from the bottom of end wall 32 of the tank. In FIG. 2 the valve is closed.

Conduit 31 is connected to pool pump 48 and filter 49 by a Tee 64. Conduit 31 is coupled to thesuction side of the pump, so that during the pump cycle the liquid within second tank 12 is drawn through conduit 31 as long as valve assembly 33 is open. An inlet line 66 extends from the pool to Tee 64 and pump 48. A return line 68 extends from a Tee 51 to the pool. Tee 51 I diverts part of the pool flow through conduit 15 into the first mixing tank. Elbow 18 has a small perforation 69 to drain the first tank at the end of each flow cycle.

The embodiments of FIGS. 1 and 2, while similar in construction, are differently connected in the pool recirculation system, the apparatus of FIG. 1 being connected to the pool through a venturi such that none of the additive solution from the second mixing tank passes through the pump and filter, and the apparatus of FIG. 2 being a cross-pump arrangement which passes the additive solution through the pump and filter to the pool.

In FIG. 4, an alternate embodiment of the invention is shown in which the first cylindrical mixing tank 11 rests on the second mixing tank 12, with the bypass line 15 extending through the upper portion of the second tank into the bottom of the first tank. Instead of a cover, the first mixing tank receives a granule storage bin 70 having a stepped cone bottom 71 with a primary cone 72 and a secondary cone 73. The storage bin has a cover 74. A storage bin cone step 76 rests upon the upper edge of the mixing tank. The secondary bottom cone 73 of the storage bin has a downwardly depending collar 78 to which a downwardly depending metering assembly 81 is attached.

The illustrative metering assembly has three cup portions 82, 83, 84. Upper cup 82 has a diaphragm 86 at its top and a frusto-conical bottom wall 87, both of which have valving ports 88, 89, respectively. Cups 83, 84 have similar frusto-conical bottoms 91, 92 with respective ports 93, 94.

A vertically movable plunger valve 96 closes port 94 of cup 84. The plunger valve is part of a float valve assembly 98 which has a float 99 and a plunger support rod 101. The float has a central vertical aperture 102 through which granules from the metering cups fall to bottom 19 of the first mixing tank.

Like the previously described embodiments, the first mixing tank of FIG. 4 contains an adjustable overflow tube 25. The tube is vertically slidable through bottom 19 of the first mixing tank and the upper wall of the second mixing tank. An adjustment handle 107 on the tube extends through the wall 26 of the first mixing tank. The tube is thereby vertically adjustable to control the liquid level within the first tank. Bypass line and conduit 31 may connect the embodiment of FIG. 4 to either a cross-pump or a venturi recirculation system.

While the illustrative embodiments are shown in conjunction with pool circulation systems, the invention has equal application to any system wherein it is desired to add a soluble additive to a liquid stream.

The embodiment of FIG. 4 is similar in liquid circulation to the previously described embodiments. I-Iowever, the amount of soluble additive added to the circulating liquid in any one cycle is determined by the rise of float 99 and the attendant traverse of the metering cups by plunger valve 96. Therefore, depending upon the height of the aperture in adjustable tube 25, the valve will traverse the ports 94, 93 and 92 of the metering cups and discharge one, two or three measures of soluble granules into the first mixing tank. The valve plunger remains at the upper level determined by the setting of the adjustable tube throughout the pump cycle. When the pump ceases the liquid level falls within the first mixing tank due to a tank drain 54A like the drain 54 of the embodiment of FIG. 1 and the float returns to the bottom of the tank, bringing with it valve plunger 96. The ports 88, 89, and 93 are thereby opened and granules from the storage bin 72 refill the metering cups 82, 83, 84 in preparation for the next cycle of the pump. The plunger 96 closes port 94 preventing granule discharge into the tank. The amount of additive introduced into the recirculating water system is thus determined by the volume of the cups and the rise of plunger 96, rather than the solubility rate and the number of the cakes exposed to circulatin g water, as in the first two described embodiments.

In the embodiment -of FIG. 5, the first and second mixing tanks 11 and 12 are associated as in the previously described embodiments. An adjustable liquid level tube 25 with a window 29 is adjustable by means of a handle 107 protruding through a wall slot 111 of the first tank 11. Once again, the embodiment of FIG. 5 may be coupled to either a cross-pump or a venturi circulation system. In FIG. 5 a liquid additive container or bottle 113 rests on the upper edge of first tank 11. The additive supply container is capped by a controlled drip cap 115 of the desired emission rate. The drops or stream emerging from cap 115 fall into a liquid pool 117 whose volume is determined by the setting of adjustable tube 25. The emerging additive mixes with the liquid in the first tank 11 and the mixture then passes through window 29 and tube 25 into second. tank 12, continuing the mixing until withdrawn through conduit 31 to the recirculating system.

It can be seen from the described embodiments that the apparatus of the invention is adapted to soluble cakes, soluble granules and liquid additives with equal facility. The first and second mixing tanks and the liquid level tube accurately control the rate at which solubles are added to the recirculating water in the case of a swimming pool. The rate of flow into the first mix-. ing tank is controlable both at bypass Tee '51 and at check valve 17. Weight 39 may be adjusted to carefully control the point at which conduit 31 closes with respect to the liquid within second tank 12.

FIG. 6 shows the apparatus of one embodiment of the invention in more detail. Granule supply bin seats upon the top of first mixing tank 11. A granule metering assembly 81 has metering cups 82, 83, 84 depending from a downward collar 121 of bin 70. A valve float 122 is sustained in a liquid pool 123 within the first tank. A valve plunger 125 with tapered ends extends on a support rod 127 from the float, which may be hollow, like the embodiment of FIG. 4.

Valve plunger 125 has a sharp lead rod 129 which helps to displace the granules within the cups and the bin to ease the upward passage of the valve plunger 125.

The height of liquid pool 123 is set by an adjustable overflow tube 25 and more particularly by the position of the window 29 of the aperture tube. The tube is adjusted in position by manipulation of a protruding handle 107 which extends from the first tank through a slot 111 in the wall of the tank. The lower termination of the slot is above the highest expected liquid level in the first tank, as is each of the handle slots of each embodiment having slots.

Overflow tube 25 extends downwardly through bottom 19 of the first tank through a sealing and friction gland 28 seated in a cavity in the tank bottom. A pretective shroud 61 surrounds the tube. A transverse pin 62 at the bottom of the shroud limits the downward extension of the tube. Liquid flowing into the first tank discharges through window 29 downwardly through.

tube 25 into the second mixing tank 12 which is'substantially similar to the second mixing tanks of the previously described embodiments. The second mixing tank has a float actuated valve assembly 33 which controls flow through an exit conduit 31.

Float valve assembly 33 has a lever arm 41 attached at pivot 42 to a support bracket 131 fixed to an end wall 32 of the second tank. Lever arm 41 extends rightwardly in FIG. 6 to support a weight 134 which has a top bracket 135 securing a float member 137 by means of a removable transverse pin 138 through the opposed wings of the bracket. The weight can be changed to adjust the level of liquid within tank 12 at which valve assembly 33 closes exit conduit 31.

Liquid is supplied tothe first mixing tank through a line 15 from the recirculation system of the pool if the device of the invention is being used with a swimming pool or other supply line to which additive is to be added. Line 15 is joined by means of a reducer coupling assembly 141 to a check valve assembly 142 partly housed in an elbow 143 extending upwardly into mixing tank 19.

The check valve, which precludes reverse flow from the tank through line 15, comprises a restriction 145 in the coupling, an extending sleeve 146 and a flexible valving member 147 residing in the elbow and fixed to the sleeve. The valving member has a bell portion 148 which surrounds the sleeve and a reduced clapper portion 149 which folds along a line 150 to close under back pressure.

Elbow 143 has a drain hole 152 to transfer to the second mixing tank liquid entrained within the first mixing tank when the pump or other liquid supply inducer shuts off.

In the normal operation of the embodiment of FIG. 6 the circulation of liquid in a system such as that previously described induces liquid flow through line and check valve 142 into the first mixing tank 19. As the liquid pool 123 rises within the first tank float 122 also rises and lifts valve plunger 125, displacing it .with respect to metering cups 82, 83, 84. In the position shown in FIG. 6, the plunger has moved outwardly away from central ports 93, 94 of cups 83, 84, respectively, such that the granules contained therein pass to the interior of the first tank. As the granules pass into the first tank they are dissolved by the liquid of the pool 123. The solution thus formed exits through window 29 and tube 25 into the second mixing tank. As sufficient liquid fills the second mixing tank, float 137 rises to pivot resilient valve member 35 away from the exit of conduit 31 introducing the additive solute into the recirculating liquid, through a line 46, as in the embodiment of FIG. 1, or a line 68 by way of the pump and filters, as in the embodiment of FIG. 2.

Broken lines 125A indicate a further elevated position of valve plunger: 125. The added elevation displaces the plunger from sealing contact with port 89 of cup 82 such that the contents of the third cup are added to the liquid pool within the first mixing tank. The added elevation of the plunger also closes port 88 in diaphragm 86 such that the storage bin no longer supplies granules to the metering cups. However, upon descent of the float and the valve plunger at the end of the liquid cycle the float and plunger descend to the bottom of the first tank, sealing bottom port 94 but opening ports 88, 89 and 93 such that granules from the supply bin 70 refill the metering cups in preparation for the next circulating cycle.

FIG. 7 illustrates an alternative form which the metering cup assembly of the invention may take. A valve plunger 171 is in position to block ports 173, 174 of intermediate metering cups 176, 177. Metering cup 177 is joined at its upper edge to an ultimate metering cup 178 which has a sealing diaphragm 179 across its top. Diaphragm 178 has a central port 181 which is aligned with a lower port 182 of cup 178 and is aligned with the subsequent lower ports of the subsequent lower metering cups. Cup 176 sits atop a'lower metering cup 185 which may be similar in construction to the other metering cups of the embodiment of FIG. 7.

Cups 176, 177, 185 are similar in structure, each having a cylindrical wall 187, a frusto-conieal lower wall 188 with its central aperture and a horizontal step 189 at the juncture of the cylindrical wall and the conical wall. The horizontal step affords a seat for engagement between theadjacent metering cups. From the inner edge of the seat a short cylindrical wall 191 makes a transition between the cylindrical wall and the conical wall. The fit between the cylindrical wall and the short step may be a press fit so that the metering cups may be assembled into mechanical engagement one with the other. Ultimate cup 178 has a shorter cylindrical wall 187A calculated for a height which gives the cup the same volume as the subsequent cups in which volume is lost to the interposed conical walls of the adjacent cups.

Lil

LII

With the metering cup assembly of FIG. 7 it is possible to adjust the greatest volume of additive which can be added under the greatest elevation of the valve plunger. Adjustment is made by the addition or removal of the press fitting cups to the cup assembly. For instance, if only two measures of the additive are desired for each cycle, cups 176 and may be removed from the metering cup assembly, leaving only the contents of cups 177 and 178 available to the first mixing tank. Conversely, cups in addition to lower cup 185 may be added to the metering assembly if a complementary height additionis added to the first mixing tank to afford a longer stroke for the valve plunger 125.

The invention disclosed by the illustrative embodiments described above is marked by its versatility in accepting additives of various types, both solid and liquid, and by its ability to combine with either cross-pump circulation systems or venturi-induced suction systems. While the illustrative embodiments have been shown as adapted to a swimming pool recirculation system, the invention isequally adaptable to use with other liquid flow systems of various natures. The invention is therefore to be measured by the appended claimsfrather than by the illustrative embodiments described herein.

I claim:

1. Apparatus'for adding solute from a supply of soluble granules to a liquid in a flow system having a pump, the apparatus comprising: a first mixing tank, a second mixing tank, liquid transmission means between the first and second tanks, means for controlling the liquid level within the first tank at which liquid is transmitted to the second tank, suction meansconnecting the second mixing tank to the flow system, means responsive to liquid level for opening and closing said suction means, means connecting said first tank to the liquid to which the solute is to be added, means to receive said soluble granules comprising a container for said granules connected to the first mixing tank, intermediate metering means interposed between the con tainer and the first mixing tank, said container being connected for granular flow to said intermediate metering means, said intermediate metering means comprising at least one metering cup with a downwardly sloping floor and a central aperture in the floor, and float actuated means adapted to open and close the central aperture in accordance with the liquid level within the first mixing tank.

2. Apparatus for adding a selected soluble additive from any of a group of cake, granule or liquid soluble additives to a liquid flow system having a pump, the apparatus comprising: a first tank, bypass means connecting said liquid flow system to the first tank, a second tank, an apertured overflow tube connecting the first and the second tanks, :1 smaller drain connecting the first and the second tanks, said overflow tube being adjustable vertically to control the liquid level within the first tank at which liquid is transmitted to the second tank, storage means for supplying soluble additive to the liquid in the first tank. metering means for exposing a measured amount of the soluble additive to the liquid in the first tank, a tank outlet adapted to drain the second tank, valve means responsive to the liquid level in the second tank for openingand closing the tank outlet, and suction means connecting the tank outlet to the flow system, said valve means comprising a valve member, a pivot arm, a float on one end of the pivot arm, and means for adjusting the buoyancy of the float, said adjusting means comprising a replaceable weight on the pivot arm, and means on the weight for securing the float.

3. Apparatus for adding a selected soluble additive from any of a group of cake, granule or liquid soluble additives to a liquid flow system having a pump, the apparatus comprising: a first tank, bypass means connecting said liquid flowsystem to the first tank, a second tank, an apertured overflow tube connecting the first and the second tanks, a smaller drain connecting the first and the second tanks, said overflow tube being adjustable vertically to control the liquid level within the first tank at which liquid is transmitted to the second tank, a storage bin having a sloping floor, metering means communicating the bin contents to the first tank, to supply soluble additive to the liquid in the first tank, said metering means including at least one metering cup with a downwardly sloping floor and a central aperture in the floor, and float actuated means adapted to open and close the central aperture in accordance with the liquid level in the first tank, a tank outlet having a horizontally opening valve port adapted to drain the second tank, valve means responsive to liquid level in the second tank for opening and closing the tank outlet, and suction means connecting the tank outlet to the flow system.

4. An apparatus as claimed in claim 3, wherein said first tank is of a size and configuration adapted to receive a supply of soluble cakes in substitution for said storage bin and metering means.

5. An apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein said first mixing tank is of a size and configuration adapted to receive a supply of soluble cakes in substitution for said container and intermediate metering means.

6. An apparatus as claimed in claim 1, wherein said intermediate metering means comprises a plurality of metering cups in vertical alignment, each of said metering cups having a downwardly sloping floor and a central aperture in said floor, said float actuated means being adapted to open and close the central aperture in each of said metering cups in accordance with the liquid level within the first mixing tank.

7. An apparatus as claimed in claim 6, wherein said metering cups are separate entities in stacked relation.

8. Apparatus for adding a solid solute to a liquid in a flow system having a pump, the apparatus comprising, a first mixing tank and a second mixing tank, said first mixing tank having a supply of solid solute therein and disposed on top of said second mixing tank, a conduit for supplying liquid from said flow system having a pump to said first mixing tank, an adjustable standpipe in said first mixing tank for conveying liquid from said first tank to said second tank, and a small drain pipe sewing to drain liquid from said first tank to said second tank, the proportions and locations of said supply conduit, said standpipe and said drain pipe being such that when said pump is in operation the level of liquid in said first tank remains at the level at which liquid enters said adjustable standpipe, the pool of liquid in said first mixing tank established by the height of said standpipe directly contacting said supply of solid solute to establish a pool of liquid with dissolved solute in said first tank, the amount of solid solute contacted by said pool varying directly as the height of the liquid in said pool, and when said pump is not in operation the drain pipe drains the liquid in said first tank to a level below which the supply of solid solute is caused to be directly contacted, said second tank having an outlet connected to said flow system, valve means responsive to the liquid level in said second tank for opening and closing said outlet, said first mixing tank being elongated vertically and sized to receive either a stack of solid soluble cakes or metering means for solid soluble granules.

9. An apparatus as claimed in claim 8, wherein said supply of solid solute comprises granules and said granules are dropped into said pool of liquid from metering means.

10. An apparatus as claimed in claim 8, wherein said supply of solid solute comprises a stack of solid cakes.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1418845 *Sep 6, 1917Jun 6, 1922George W StetsonWater-level controller
US1459486 *May 9, 1922Jun 19, 1923Fletcher John FAutomatic float valve for the separation of two immiscible liquids
US2204998 *Sep 6, 1938Jun 18, 1940Batt Walter CWater eliminator
US2760820 *Jun 30, 1954Aug 28, 1956Nu Way Harvester CompanyApplicator for water soluble fertilizers, fungicides, insecticides, and the like
US3094134 *Mar 2, 1961Jun 18, 1963Fulbright Lab IncDispersing device
US3323539 *Oct 12, 1964Jun 6, 1967Tesco Chem IncChemical feeding device
US3356460 *Jan 13, 1964Dec 5, 1967King Kratz CorpLiquid treatment apparatus
US3430823 *Feb 23, 1968Mar 4, 1969Universal Oil Prod CoLiquid dispensing system
US3456801 *Jan 16, 1968Jul 22, 1969Bowles Letcher HApparatus for feeding dry particulate chlorinating reagent into a swimming pool
US3472425 *Aug 12, 1968Oct 14, 1969Jack J BoothCarbonator for drink-dispensing machine
US3474817 *May 11, 1967Oct 28, 1969Jacketing SpecialtyContinuous chemical additive dispenser for swimming pool systems and the like
US3507624 *Sep 14, 1966Apr 21, 1970Tesco Chem IncChemical feeder using jets of liquid against solid body of chemicals
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3853481 *Nov 16, 1973Dec 10, 1974Murray WBalance beam feeder
US3912627 *Jun 11, 1973Oct 14, 1975Olin CorpDissolving and dispensing water soluble material containing available chlorine to a swimming pool
US3929151 *Mar 6, 1974Dec 30, 1975Harry S RubinMixing apparatus
US4115270 *Oct 31, 1977Sep 19, 1978Phillips Ash SChlorinator for swimming pools
US4208376 *Mar 13, 1978Jun 17, 1980Olin CorporationWater treatment chemical dispenser with control tube
US4260587 *Oct 25, 1977Apr 7, 1981Braden John RPressure compensated potable water chlorinator
US4407322 *Dec 2, 1980Oct 4, 1983Moore Stephen DChemical feeder
US4548228 *Sep 30, 1983Oct 22, 1985Moore Stephen DChemical feeder
US5019250 *Sep 8, 1989May 28, 1991Lorenzen Walter CAutomatic chemical dispenser
US5427694 *Jul 8, 1993Jun 27, 1995Calgon CorporationProcess for delivering a selected effective amount of a dry granular antimicrobial composition to an aqueous system
US5932093 *Jan 30, 1998Aug 3, 1999Chulick; JoeChlorine dispenser
US6182681Dec 4, 1998Feb 6, 2001John Neil RobertsonAutomatic dry granular chemical dispenser
US6217892Oct 24, 1997Apr 17, 2001Joseph A. KingWater treatment composition
US8852442Feb 22, 2011Oct 7, 2014Delaware Capital Formation, Inc.Solid chemical dissolver and methods
EP0751097A2 *Jun 24, 1996Jan 2, 1997Olin (U.K.) LimitedWater treatment system
WO1999029403A1 *Dec 4, 1998Jun 17, 1999Chengeta CuthbertAutomatic dry granular chemical dispenser
WO2005092484A1 *Mar 16, 2005Oct 6, 2005Dahl MaartenSystem and method for admixing a liquid state medium to a liquid state flow
WO2010043940A1 *Aug 31, 2009Apr 22, 2010Leslie Richard PalmerAutomatic dry granular chemical dispenser, for example for the chlorination of water in a swimming pool
WO2013050981A1 *Oct 5, 2012Apr 11, 2013Marchi & Brevetti Interprise S.R.L. Con Unico SocioDevice and method for dissolving a chemical substance in water
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/268, 422/266
International ClassificationB01F5/04, C02F1/68, B01F1/00, B01F15/02, B01F3/08
Cooperative ClassificationB01F3/0861, B01F15/026, B01F15/0201, B01F1/0027, B01F5/0496, C02F1/687, C02F1/686, C02F1/688, C02F2103/42
European ClassificationB01F15/02B40U, C02F1/68P4, C02F1/68P2, B01F1/00F2, B01F5/04C18, B01F3/08F, B01F15/02B, C02F1/68P6
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 30, 1984AS02Assignment of assignor's interest
Owner name: ANZEN PRODUCTS, INC.,
Effective date: 19840227
Owner name: EPICUREAN PRODUCTS, INC.,
Mar 30, 1984ASAssignment
Owner name: EPICUREAN PRODUCTS, INC.,
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:ANZEN PRODUCTS, INC.,;REEL/FRAME:004239/0795
Effective date: 19840227