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Publication numberUS3711089 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1973
Filing dateOct 20, 1969
Priority dateNov 13, 1968
Also published asDE1943508A1
Publication numberUS 3711089 A, US 3711089A, US-A-3711089, US3711089 A, US3711089A
InventorsP Reinhard
Original AssigneeP Reinhard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski training apparatus
US 3711089 A
Abstract
A ski training device for simulating substantially all of the movements encountered during normal skiing, such as longitudinal, vertical and sidewards of tilting movements. Each ski is advantageously supported by at least one pair of spaced rollers, and the skis may rest either directly upon the rollers, or upon endless belts passing around and extending between the forward and rearward rollers of each pair. According to one embodiment of the invention longitudinal movement of the skis may be imparted by a crank arrangement which acts upon flexible pulley cords or belts to lengthwise shift the skis. A further embodiment of the invention contemplates vertical pivotal movement of each roller through the provision of a hydraulic cylinder drive arrangement which is operatively associated with lever members acting upon the rollers. A further embodiment of the invention and serving for producing irregular longitudinal and transverse tilting movement of the skis contemplates eccentrically mounting the rollers upon transverse axles, the forward and rearward rollers of each pair being counter rotated by means of a gear train, the rollers supporting one ski rotating faster than those supporting the other ski to thereby produce both longitudinal and tilting movement of the skis. The invention also teaches the possibility of not powering the rollers but having such mounted so as to be freely rotatable in response to forward and rearward movement of the skis. Weights or springs may be used for rotationally biasing the rollers to a rest position and providing resistance against rotation. Hydraluc cylinders or cam operated crank arms may also be provided for effecting vertical or pivotal movement of each roller relative to the others.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 1 91 Reinhard [451 Jan-.16. 27 i [541 SKI TRAINING APPARATUS Paul Reinhard, 4917 Melchau, Switzerland [22] Filed: Oct. 20, 1969 [21] Appl. No.: 867,711

[76] Inventor:

[30] Foreign Application Priority Data Nov. 13, 1968 Switzerland... ..16902/68 [52] U.S. Cl. ..272/57 B [51] Int. Cl. ..A63b 69/18 [58] Field of Search ..272/57 B, 69, 56.5 SS, 1 R

[56] References Cited UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,274,081 2/1942 Mautin ..272/57 B 2,573,808 11/1951 Ravoire ..272/57 B Primary Examiner-Richard C. Pinkham Assistant Examiner-Richard J. Apley Attorney-Werner W. Kleeman [57 ABSTRACT A ski training device for simulating substantially all of the movements encountered during normal skiing, such as longitudinal, vertical and sidewards of tilting movements. Each ski is advantageously supported by at least one pair of spaced rollers, and the skis may rest either directly upon the rollers, or upon endless belts passing around and extending between the forward and rearward rollers of each pair. According to one embodiment of the invention longitudinal movement of the skis may be imparted by a crank arrangement which acts upon flexible pulley cords or belts to lengthwise shift the skis. A further embodiment of the invention contemplates vertical pivotal movement of each roller through the provision of a hydraulic cylinder drive arrangement which is operatively associated with lever members acting upon the rollers. A further embodiment of the invention and serving for producing irregular longitudinal and transverse tilting movement of the skis contemplates eccentrically mounting the rollers upon transverse axles, the forward and rearward rollers of each pair being counter rotated by means of a gear train, the rollers supporting one ski rotating faster than those supporting the other ski to thereby produce both longitudinal and tilting movement of the skis. The invention also teaches the possibility of not powering the rollers but having such mounted so as to be freely rotatable in response to forward and rearward movement of the skis. Weights or springs may be used for rotationally biasing the rollers to a rest position and providing resistance against rotation. Hydraluc cylinders or cam operated crank arms may also be prov1ded for effectmg vertical or pivotal movement of each roller relative to the others.

19 Claims, 9 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJAH I 6 197a 3.711.089

sum 1 [IF 5 PATENTEDJAH 16 1975 SHEET 3 OF 5 F/Gd PATENTED N IBB 3 711 089 SHEET 6 UF 5 M (@S I W SKI TRAINING APPARATUS BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to ski training devices, and particularly to a practice device for simulating the movements involved in actual skiing.

It is known to provide devices which can be used by a skier to practice various movements involved in skiing, which devices are designed for use either indoors or at any other location where a suitable snow-covered surface is either temporarily or permanently unavailable for practice. One such known device comprises a plurality of mats having bristles or the like ontheir upper surfaces, which mats may be placed semi-permanently upon a level surface or a slope and which offer a fair substitute for snow for skiing upon. However, to be effective, such mats must cover a wide area and hence take up a great deal of space, and inasmuch as they represent a considerable investment of space and money, these mats can obviously not be used in all cations and under all circumstances where they might otherwise be desirable.

Other training devices are known which employ tiltable or rotating supports for skis in a fixed location to simulate either twisting movements or long crosscountry striding movements, depending upon the particular construction involved. However, these known devices are generally capable of only a limited number of movements and hence develop skill in only a limited fraction of the desired turning or moving exercises for skiing.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION With the above background in mind, it is therefore a primary object of the invention to provide a ski training device which will enable practicing a wide variety of the movements encountered in skiing.

It is a further object of the invention to provide such a training device which requires a minimum of space, and preferably requires a space only slightly greater than the length ofa pair of skis.

It s yet a further object of the invention to provide such a ski training device which can develop as general a ski training background as possible and which in particular will develop a good sense of balance, quick reflex action, and intensive muscle training on the part of the skier.

These as well as other objects of the invention which will become evident as the description proceeds, are implemented by the provision of a ski training device according to the present invention, which, generally speaking, comprises at least one supporting means movable elevationally and in the lengthwise direction of the ski, and upon which the ski always bears. According to a specific embodiment, the invention comprises supporting means for each ski comprising at least a pair of rollers having parallel axes disposed transversely to the axes of the skis, the skis resting either directly upon the rollers or upon endless belts passing around and extending between the forward and rearward rollers in each pair.

In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the rollers are eccentrically mounted upon their transverse axles out of phase with respect to each other and the rollers of each pair are counter-rotated by a motor and gear drive so that alternate forward and rearward longitudinal and tilting movements are produced. Means are provided for sequential or independent vertical and pivoting movements of the respective axles to further produce sideways tilting motions.

In further embodiments of the invention, the rollers are non-powered and rotate responsive to longitudinal movements of the skis thereupon. The rollers are centrally mounted upon their respective axles and include means to bias each roller rotationally to a rest position and/or means to produce vertical or pivotal movements of each axle.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS The invention will be better understood from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment of the invention as well as several alternative embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an overall perspective view of the training device constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIG. 2 is a horizontal schematic view showing the means for producing opposing longitudinal movement of two skis;

FIG. 3 is a vertical side elevational view, partially in section, showing one form of arrangement for producing vertical movement of the rollers;

FIG. 4 is a horizontal plane view, partially in section, showing the drive means for the rollers; and

FIGS. 5 through 9 are side elevational views showing schematically five alternative arrangements for producing rotational and/or vertical movements of the rollers.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring first to FIG. 1, a ski training device is illustrated comprising supporting means for a pair of skis, which supporting means preferably comprises four drums or rollers l, 2, 3, 4 which are rotatably journaled by any suitable means at the ends thereof in a stationary frame, not shown. The frame has secured thereto longitudinally extending upright side walls 5 and 6 which extend above the upper surfaces of the rollers and define therebetween a lateral enclosed space for a pair of skis resting upon rollers l and 2 and rollers 3 and 4, respectively. Flooring panels 7, 8, and 9 fill the spaces in front of forward rollers 2 and 3 and behind the rearward rollers l and 4 as well as between the forward and rearward rollers, and are recessed below the upper surfaces of the rollers.

Extending generally parallel to the upright side walls 5 and 6 and supported thereabove at any suitable height by vertical support members 11 and 12, are a pair of handrails forming hand operated control rods 10 and 13. Control rod 10 is connected by a suitable mechanical linkage, switch means, or other means, not shown, to control means within a vertically extending control housing 14 situated at one corner of the device, and serves to control the on-off operation of the device. As an example, control rod 10 may be rigidly secured to vertical support member 11 at one end thereof, which support member is pivotable about its lower end within side wall 6, and is suitably connected to a linkage or switch means so that lateral displacement of control rod 10 to either side of its central vertical position, in the direction of the double arrow, will actuate the drive means for the rollers. Hence, release of control rod 10 to its central upright position, for instance, will shutrdown the device and thus acts as a so-called dead-man control. Similarly, floor panels 7, 8 and 9, or any combination thereof, if desired, can also function to shut-off the mechanism, as in the event the skier falls from the rollers onto one of the panels. Then the floor panels act also as dead-man pedals with a reverse switching action. Conversely, control rod 13 may be rotatably mounted within vertical support member 12 and within control housing 14 and may be connected to suitable control means, for instance for controlling the speed of the drive means by rotation of the control rod 13, as shown by the double arrow.

Control housing 14 may also include indicating means for indicating the operating condition of the device. A suitable first dial 15 may indicate the rotational speed at which the device is operating, and a second dial 16 may indicate the elapsed time that the device has been operating during training. The device may be used as a coin-operated mechanism, in which case a suitable coin slot 17, together with suitable internal coin control means, and a malfunction indicator such as a signal light 18 are provided, and time indicator dial 16 may then indicate the amount of remaining time left to the user before completion of the cycle and shut-off of the apparatus. In use, the skier enters the device of FIG. 1, in the direction of arrow 19 thereof.

Means may be included for restraining the skis against improper or excessive movement, which may comprise a longitudinal divider member 8, shown in phantom in FIG. 1, which acts as side stop means and serves to keep each ski on its respective side of the device. Additionally, removable transverse end stop means, not shown, may also be included to prevent the skis from overunning the forward or rearward ends of the device. Further, partition or divider member 8' can also be used, if desired, to shut-off the device.

In FIG. 2 means are shown for impartinG longitudinal movement to the skis independently of the rotation of the rollers. Rollers l, 2, 3 and 4 are shown with skis SK] and SK-2 in position thereupon; the rear ends of the skis are connected to each other by a first flexible cord or rope 5-1 which passes around a pulley or roller R positioned behind the rear ends of the skis. By means of this cord S-1 and pulley R, it is clear that forward movement of one of the skis, e.g., SK-l, will result in rearward movement of the other ski. Roller R is biased towards a first anchor point upon the frame by means of a first tension spring F-l. The forward end of one of the skis, SK-2, is connected by means of a second flexible cord or rope S3 to a second tension spring F-2, which is in turn secured to a second anchor point on the frame. First and second flexible cords S1 and S-3, pulley R, and first and second tension springs F-] and F-2, together form a buffer means for the skis to prevent jerky or irregular longitudinal movements of the skis.

The forward end of ski SK-l is secured by means ofa third flexible cord or rope S-2, passing around first and second guide rollers R and R", to a crank pin KZ mounted on the end ofa crank arm K, which crank arm K is driven by any suitable drive means and may either rotate continuously or may oscillate. It is apparent that during a portion of the travel of crank pin K2, the cord S-2 and hence ski SK-l will be drawn forwardly, and in turn will draw ski SK-2 rearwardly due to the action of cord S-l passing around pulley or roller R. During the return travel of crank pin KZ, cord 8-2 will be slackened and skis SK-l and SK-2 will return to their normal positions due to the return biasing action of springs F-l and F-2. Thus, it will be seen that alternating and opposing forward and rearward movements of skis SK-l and SK-Z will be produced.

In FIG. 3 means are shown for producing vertical pivoting movements of each drum relative to the other drums. Although the drums supporting only one ski SK are illustrated, it should be evident that this supporting structure may be substantially duplicated on the other side of the device to support the other ski. Drums 1 and 2, corresponding generally to drums 1 and 2 in FIGS. 1 and 2, are rotatably mounted on the inner ends of horizontal portions of lever arms SH-l and SH-Z, respectively, and are counter-rotated by means of drive motors M-l, M-2 and drive belts R-l and R-2, respectively, the drive motors also being secured to the respective lever arms to pivot therewith. Lever arms SH-1 and SH-2 pivot about fixed pivot points secured to the frame, and have the lower ends of their vertical portions pivotally connected to the outer ends of piston rods PL-l and PL-2, which piston rods have pistons Pk-l and PK2 on the opposite ends thereof, sliding within hydraulic cylinders P-1 and P-2, respectively. The hydraulic cylinders P-1 and P-2 may be kept at a constant pressure or may be subject to a cyclically variable pressure to effect oscillating motion of the lever arms SH-l and SH-2 and hence the drums I and 2.

As the ski SK moves forwardly or rearwardly, the center of gravity shifts accordingly and exerts greater or lesser pressure on each of the respective drums l and 2, thus creating a greater or lesser frictional force between the rotating drum and the SK and resulting in the ski being driven alternately forwardly and backwardly as the weight shifts. In this manner, the skier is constantly forced to shift his own weight to compensate for or match these movements of the skis.

Means are shown in FIG. 4 for producing irregular longitudinal and transverse tilting of the skis. In this figure, four drums 1", 2", 3", and 4" are provided, each of which has an eccentric hollow shaft H-l, H-2, H3,and H-4,.respectively, extending in a generally axial direction therethrough. Front and rear axles HA-Z and HA-l are rigidly mounted between side frame members RA and pass through the respective hollow shafts l-I-2, H-3 and H-l, H4 of the drums so that the drums are individually free to rotate about the respective shafts HA-l and PIA-2.

Each hollow shaft terminates in a respective toothed gear Z-l, 2-2, 2-3 and 2-4 rigidly attached thereto. The toothed gears on each side of the device are driven by a motor M-ll, M-Z through bevel gear pair W-l, W-2 and a pair of counter-rotating gears ZS, Z6 and Z-7, 2-8, which respectively engage the gears 2-1, 2-2, 2-4, and 2-3. Gears 2-5 and Z7 of each counter-rotating pair each have fewer teeth than gears Z6 and 2-8 of the respective pairs, so that forward drums 2" and 3 rotate at a greater speed that rear drums 1" and 4". In addition, motors M-ll and M-12 may operate at different speeds so that all four drums are rotating at different speeds from each other. Due to the eccentric mounting of the rollers upon their respective hollow shafts, rotation of the rollers will produce a highly irregular cyclic pattern of longitudinal and transverse tilting of the skis SK supported thereby, particularly if different drive speeds are used for the rollers. Alternately, the forward and rearward rollers may be driven at the same speed, in which case the rollers are constantly out of phase and produce a regular tilting movement whose frequency will depend upon the rotational speed of the rollers. As a further alternative, it is possible to utilize a single motor to drive the rollers on only one side and thereby obtain an asynchronous operation of the rollers on the other side by means of a slip clutch, hydraulic converter, or the like. It is also possible to utilize a single motor in such a way that the four rollers, in a given eccentric phase displacement, are regulated relative to each other.

FIGS. 5 through 9 depict modifications of the invention which can be utilized to effect various combinations of tilting motions. In these figures, two rollers 100 and 200 on one side of the device are illustrated supporting a single ski SK, and it will be understood that the structure shown is substantially duplicated on the other side of the device. In FIGS. 5, 6, 8, and 9, an endless belt 101 passes around rollers 100 and 200, and the ski SK is supported upon the upper run of belt 101.

In FIGS. 5 and 6, rollers 100 and 200 are rotatably mounted upon the outer horizontal ends of angled lever arms 110, 210 which are pivotably mounted upon fixed bearing means 113 rigidly secured to the frame. The lower vertical ends of these lever arms carry cam follower means preferably comprising rotatable cam follower rollers lll and 112, which rollers engage the outer surface of a rotating eccentric cam EX having irregular lobes thereupon and driven by any suitable drive means. It will be seen that the weight of rollers 100, 200 will keep the cam followers 111, 112 biased towards the surface of cam EX. and that rotation of the cam will cause the lobes to move the cam follower rollers I11, 112 outwardly and hence pivot the supports for rollers 100 and 200 upwardly. By selecting a cam of suitable contour, any desired pattern or sequence of pivoting may be provided for rollers 100 and 200 relative to each other, inasmuch as lever arms 110 and 210 are free t pivot independently of each other.

In these two modifications, the rollers 100 and 200 and endless belt 101 are not power driven but are substantially free to rotate responsive to forward and rearward longitudinal movements of the skier, depicted by arrow SKB. Means are provided for rotationally biasing the rollers towards a rest or equilibrium position to prevent excessive movement of the skis and to provide a resistance to such movement in order to improve the value of the exercises. In FIG. 5, each of the rollers 100, 200 has secured thereto by any suitable means, preferably interior of the rollers, eccentric weights 102, 202; it will be appreciated that the rollers 100, 200 will tend to assume a rest or equilibrium position with the eccentric weights 102, 202 downward.

FIG. 6 differs from FIG. only in that the eccentric weights I02 and 202 are eliminated and instead a spring biasing system is utilized. Each of the rollers 100, 200 has rigidly secured thereto a small pulley 104, 204; a flexible rope or cord 105 is passed around each of the pulleys in turn, and the opposite ends of rope 105 are secured to tension springs 103 and 203 which are in turn secured to the frame rearwardly and forwardly, respectively, of the rollers and 200. It will be appreciated that as ski SK moves forwardly and rearwardly in the direction of arrow SKB, cord will be drawn in the opposite direction by one of the springs 103 and 203 against the pull of the other spring, and hence these springs will act to bias the rollers 100, 200 towards a central equilibrium or rest position.

In FIG. 7 a modification is shown substantially similar to FIG. 6, with the lever arms and 210 and eccentric cam EX removed for clarity. In this modification no belt 101 is provided, the ski SK resting directly upon rollers 100 and 200; however, operation is otherwise identical with the modification of FIG. 6.

In FIG. 9 another modification is shown also substantially similar to that of FIG. 6, with the lever arms 110 and 210 and eccentric cam EX again removed for clarity. In this modification a belt 101 passes around rollers 100 and 200 and supports ski SK thereupon, as described above; in place of the biasing means, however, driven means are provided for alternately producing forward and rearward movement of the ski SK. One of the rollers, illustrated as 100, has rigidly secured to one end of its axle a driving arm 232. Arm 232 is pivotally attached at its end opposite roller 100, to a crank arm 231 which is operated by a rotatable crank 230, driven by any suitable drive means in either direction, as shown by the double arrow. It should be clear that rotation of crank 230 will oscillate driving arm 232 and hence roller 100, and therefore alternate forward and rearward motion of ski SK supported thereon will result, as shown by arrow SKB.

FIG. 8 illustrates a further modification of the invention wherein the cam operated tilting means of FIGS. 5 through 7 is replaced by a hydraulic tilting means. Rollers 100 and 200 have a supporting bar 121 extending therebetween and rotatably secured at its opposite ends to the axles 122 and 222 of the respective rollers. A first vertical hydraulic cylinder 124 has a piston 125 sliding therein, secured at its outer end to a piston rod 123 which is pivotally mounted upon arm 121 intermediate the axles 122 and 222; a second vertical hydraulic cylinder 224 has a piston 225 sliding therein and secured to a second piston rod 223 pivotally mounted upon arm 121 adjacent the axle 222 of roller 200. Hydraulic cylinders I24 and 224 are connected to any suitable pressure source and to a control means, not shown, so that any desired pattern of vertical movement of piston rods 123 and 223, and hence tilting of ski SK, is produced. Additionally, tension springs and 220, secured at one end thereof to bar 121 in the vicinity of first piston rod 123 and at the other end thereof to belt 101, may be provided to bias the rollers 100 and 200 and belt 101 towards a rest position, as described above.

In all of the above embodiments, the two forward rollers may, if desired, be constructed as a single roller serving as a common support for the front ends of both skis; the two rearward rollers may likewise be constructed as a single roller supporting the rear ends of the skis. As a further modification, a rigid support such as a board or slat may rest upon the forward and rearward rollers and support the skis thereupon, in place of the rollers alone or the rollers and an endless belt. It is possible, if desired, to thereby eliminate one of the rollers.

It will be .evident that the invention may be constructed by combining the above modifications in numerous ways in addition to those already specifically described in detail. The embodiments given as representative examples merely serve to show that by means of the training device of this invention, practically all movements of skiing can be simulatedso that an ideal training apparatus may be constructed by relatively simple means.

It is also evident that by constructing a ski training device according to the above detailed description, all of the objects set forth in the introduction have been successfully fulfilled. Accordingly,

What is claimed is:

l. A ski training device comprising support means supporting a pair of skis, means for imparting forward and rearward longitudinal movement to at least one of said skis, means for tilting said support means in at least one direction, said supporting means comprising at least one pair of forward and rearward support rollers respectively supporting the forward and rearward ends of each of said skis, said rollers being rotatable about axes disposed transversely to the length of said skis, and said means for imparting motion to said ski comprises drive means for counter-rotating the rollers of said pair of rollers relative to each other.

2. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein said tilting means comprises eccentric axles upon which each of said rollers is rotatably mounted.

3. A device as defined in claim 2 wherein the forward and rearward rollers of each said pair of rollers are driven at different rotational speeds relative to each other.

4. A device as defined in claim 2 wherein two pairs of said rollers are provided, each of said rollers being driven at a different rotational speed fromeach of the others of said rollers.

5. A device as defined in claim 2 wherein said tilting means comprises a crank arm associated with each of said rollers, said crank arm having a vertical portion and a horizontal portion and pivotally mounted upon a stationary frame portion of the device intermediate said horizontal and vertical portions, each said axle being pivotally secured to the end of said horizontal portion, and means engaging said vertical portion for pivoting said crank arm, thereby pivoting said axle and said roller therewith.

6. A device as defined in claim 5 wherein said last named means comprises the piston rod of a hydraulic piston.

7. A device as defined in claim 5 wherein said last named means comprises a rotary cam.

S. A ski training device comprising support means supporting a pair of skis, means for imparting forward and rearward longitudinal movement to at least one of said skis, means for tilting said support means in at least one direction, said supporting means comprises at least one pair of forward and rearward support rollers respectively supporting the forward and rearward ends of each of said skis, said rollers being rotatable about axes disposed transversely to the length of said skis, and said means for imparting motion to said ski comprises a crank arm adapted for rotation and having a crank pin secured to one end thereof, and a flexible rope secured at one end thereof to said crank pin and at the other end thereof to the forward end of said one ski, whereby rotation of said crank arm will draw one ski forwardly.

9. A device as defined in claim 8, further comprising return spring means to draw said one ski rearwardly opposite the action of said crank arm and said rope.

10. A device as defined in claim 9, further comprising a second flexible rope secured at one end thereof to the rearward end of said one ski and at the other end thereof to the rearward end of the other of said skis, and passing over a pulley intermediate said ends of said rope, whereby forward movement of either ski will draw the other ski rearwardly.

11. A ski training device comprising support means supporting a pair of skis, means for imparting forward and rearward longitudinal movement to at least one of said skis, means for tilting said support means in at least one pair of forward and rearward support rollers respectively supporting the forward and rearward ends of each of said skis, said rollers being rotatable about axes disposed transversely to the length of said skis, and said means for imparting motion to said ski comprises a crank arm rigidly secured at one end thereof to at least one of said rollers, said crank arm being pivotally secured at its other end to a rotating crank, whereby rotation of said crank will oscillate said crank arm and said roller.

12. A ski training device comprising means for supporting at least one of a pair of skis, and means for moving said supporting means vertically and in the longitudinal direction of said ski, said supporting means comprising at least two rollers, each of which rollers is rotatable about an axis, the axes of said rollers being disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of said skis, at least one of said rollers being adapted to be pivoted vertically, each of said rollers being pivotally mountedon a lever arm.

13. A ski training device comprising means for supporting at least one of a pair of skis, and means for moving said supporting means vertically and in the longitudinal direction of said ski, said supporting means comprising at least two rollers, each of which rollers is rotatable about an axis, the axes of said rollers being disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of said skis, at least one of said rollers comprises an eccentric member.

14. A device as defined in claim 13 wherein the axis of said eccentric member is rotatably secured eccentrically to said member.

15. A ski training device comprising means for supporting at least one of a pair of skis, and means for moving said supporting means vertically and in the longitudinal direction of said ski, said supporting means comprises at least two rollers, each of which rollers is rotatable about an axis, the axes of said rollers being disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of said skis, and said two rollers each being driven by motor means in opposite rotational directions relative to each other.

16. A device as defined in claim 15 wherein said rollers supporting one of said skis are driven at a different rotational speed from the rollers supporting the other of said skis.

17. A ski training device comprising means for supporting at least one of a pair of skis, and means for moving said supporting means vertically and in the longitudinal direction of said ski, said supporting means comprising four rollers rotatably secured within a frame, said rollers being driven by motor means about eccentric axes, at least both rollers supporting one of disposed transversely to the longitudinal axis of said said skis being driven at the same rotational speed, and ki d f th m i i handrails disposed to the the rollers supporting different skis rotating at different Side of Said supporting means one of Said handrafls rotational speeds. b

em ada ted to o erate a sto 1n means for said rol- 18. A ski training device comprising means for sup- 5 p p pp g porting at least one of a pan of skls and means for 19. A device as defined in claim 18 wherein the other moving said supporting means vertically and in the longitudinal direction of Said ski said Supporting means of said handrails is adapted to operate a speed control means for said rollers.

comprises at least two rollers, each of which rollers is rotatable about an axis, the axes of said rollers being

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4023795 *Dec 15, 1975May 17, 1977Pauls Edward ACross-country ski exerciser
US4151839 *Feb 25, 1977May 1, 1979Schwarz Peter WExercise machine
US4204673 *Dec 14, 1978May 27, 1980Speer John SrDual-tread exerciser
US5338273 *Jan 27, 1993Aug 16, 1994Roadmaster CorporationQuick change mechanism for synchronous/asynchronous exercise machine
US5499957 *Aug 10, 1994Mar 19, 1996Roadmaster CorporationQuick change mechanism for synchronous/asynchronous exercise machine
US5503610 *Jun 2, 1995Apr 2, 1996Roadmaster CorporationQuick change mechanism for synchronous/asynchronous exercise machine
US6305151 *Jan 19, 1999Oct 23, 2001Natec, Reich, Summer Gmbh & Co. KgMethod and device for shaping and portioning a soft, pasty product
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/7, 482/71
International ClassificationA63B69/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63B22/0023, A63B69/182, A63B22/203
European ClassificationA63B22/00B4, A63B69/18C, A63B22/20T2