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Publication numberUS3711678 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 16, 1973
Filing dateFeb 1, 1971
Priority dateOct 5, 1970
Also published asCA916212A
Publication numberUS 3711678 A, US 3711678A, US-A-3711678, US3711678 A, US3711678A
InventorsKuus H
Original AssigneeKuus H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric ski waxer
US 3711678 A
Abstract
A tool for applying wax to the underside of a ski, the device comprising a hollow block of aluminum fitted with an electric heater therewithin, the heater being secured to a hollow handle through which an electric extension cord extends to communicate at one end with the heater and at its opposite end being provided with a male plug for inserting into an electric outlet socket; the block when being properly heated being particularly suitable for softening and applying the wax; and the block having four parallel corner edges each one of which is of a different shape or size of shape so to be adaptable to get into various shaped ski grooves.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent [191 Kuus 1 Jan. 16,1973

[ 1 ELECTRIC SKI WAXER 2,218,420 10/1940 Coppedge ..219/227 [76] Inventor: Herbert Kuus, 30 Deanvar Avenue, FOREIGN PATENTS OR APPLICATIONS Scarborough, Ontario, Canada 19 28 [22] Filed: Feb. I, 1971 764,887 1/1957 Great Britain 2 /2 Appl. No.: 111,452

[52] [1.8. CI. ..219/227, 15/236, 30/140, 118/101, 219/236, 219/243, 219/533 [51] Int. Cl. ..H05b U011 [58] Field of Search ..219/221, 227-242, 219/245, 533, 243; 30/140; 15/236; 38/93; 228/51-55; 401/1; 118/200, 202,100,101

[ 56] References Cited UN1TED STATES PATENTS 2,019,975 11/1935 Hoyer ..2l9/228 UX 2,380,855 7/1945 Lower ..15/236 R 3,325,627 6/1967 Adler et al.... ..2l9/227 2,249,600 7/1941 Bryan ..219/243 1,816,113 7/1931 Feld ..2l9/227 2,304,559 12/1942 Engesser ..2l9/228 UX 1,157,343 10/1915 Thompson ..2l9/228 Primary ExaminerA. Bartis Attorney-Carl Miller [57] ABSTRACT A tool for applying wax to the underside of a ski, the device comprising a hollow block of aluminum fitted with an electric heater therewithin, the heater being secured to a hollow handle through which an electric extension cord extends to communicate at one end with the heater and at its opposite end being provided with a male plug for inserting into an electric outlet socket; the block when being properly-heated being particularly suitable for softening and applying the wax; and the block having four parallel corner edges each one of which is of a different shape or size of shape so to be adaptable to get into various shaped ski grooves.

1 Claim, 3 Drawing Figures PATENTEDJAH 16 1975 FT'T'OEA EY ELECTRIC SKI WAXER This invention relates generally to wax applicators. More specifically it relates to an electrical device for waxing skis.

It is generally well known to those skilled in the art that conventional ski waxing tools presently being used comprise waxing irons with tablets and torches which are dangerous as a fire hazard and particularly dangerous whenever used by youngsters. The use of iron tablets is more expensive and burning tablets keep falling out of the iron, damage the skis, and cause smoke and an unpleasant smell. Carbon monoxide penetrates the wax and leaves the smoothness of skis much to be desired, which in turn gives less pleasing skiing. The ski waxing tools in use at present are inefficient, taking in considering that the time spent for waxing and approximately one-half of the wax being scrapped off and thrown away. A final factor of consideration is that the present method of ski waxing contributes unnecessarily to air pollution. The situation is of course objectionable and therefore in want of improvement.

Accordingly it is a principle object of the present invention to provide an electric ski waxer which overcomes all of the above objections, and which is a preci-' sion tool for producing a perfect waxing of all skis.

Another object is to provide an electric ski waxer that requires no skill by an operator.

Yet another object is to provide an electric ski waxer which is portable so to be conveniently carried upon a ski trip away from home.

Yet another object is to provide an electric ski waxer which will neither overheat nor cause the wax to smoke, burn or damage the base, and wherein the smoothness of the skis is guaranteed by way of even temperature and lack of carbon monoxide.

Other objects are to provide an electric ski waxer which is simple in design, inexpensive to manufacture, rugged in construction, easy to use and efficient in operation.

In summary, there is here presented an electrical ski waxer in which the block is specifically configurated so to reach into various sizes and shapes of ski grooves as well as gliding over the flat surfaces thereof for evenly coating the same all over.

To the accomplishment of the above and related objects, my invention may be embodied in the form illustrated in the accompanying drawings, attention being called to the fact, however, that the drawings are illustrative only, and that changes may be made in the specific construction illustrated and described within the'scope ofthe appended claims.

FIG. I is a perspective view of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a bottom view ofthe working block.

FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of the aluminum block.

Referring now to the drawing in detail the reference numeral represents an electric ski waxer according to the present invention wherein there is an aluminum block 11 of approximately 3 inches length, and which includes longitudinal opposite sides 12 and 13, and which at its end forms a bottom wall 14. Variously rounded edges and corners 15 are shaped to wax the ski grooves. The interior of the block is hollowed to form a recess 16 receiving a protruding electric heater 17 which is connected to an extendin handle 18 through WI'IICII an electric extension cord 1 IS passed, one end of the cord being connected to the heater and the other end being provided with a male electric plug 20 for being attached to an electric outlet socket 21.

In use the 3 inch long block will meet the ski base width and gives the right amount of waxing on the working surface. The variously rounded edges 15 will be adaptable to suit all various types of skis on the market. In use, the block reaches waxing heat in seven minutes after the plug is electrically connected. After cleaning the old wax from the skis, melt the wax against the waxer, and let it drop on the ski 22, then smooth the wax against the waxer. The edges and corners l5 serve to wax the groove 23 of the ski.

While certain novel features of my invention have been shown and described and are pointed out in the annexed claims, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions and changes in the forms and details of the device illustrated and in its operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the invention.

lclaim:

1. In an Electric Ski Waxer, the combination of an elongated aluminum block, an electric heater and a handle joined to one longitudinal end of said block, said electric heater being connected to an electric power source so to heat said block for applying wax to an underside of a ski, said block being six sided by including a pair of opposite longitudinal sides, a top side, a bottom side, a front side and a rear side, said handle being secured to said rear side of said block, the electric heater being positioned within the block with the power supply means therefor extending through the rear side of the block into the handle, the four longitudinal corner edges between said longitudinal sides, top side and bottom side being variously shaped so to accommodate all ski configurations in rubbing wax on said skis, said corner edges comprising one thereof having a small rounded shape, another thereof having a large rounded shape, another thereof having an irregular curve shape, and another thereof being bevelled to form a flat face disposed at an angle to said bottom side and a longitudinal side of the block, said block being hollowed out, said heater being cantileverly supported in the hollowed-out portion of the block and in spaced relation to said block, heat from said heater being transmitted across a space of said hollowed-out portion and through said block from an inner surface to an outer surface thereof.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1157343 *Feb 5, 1915Oct 19, 1915Anthony M LuxElectrically-heated tool.
US1816113 *Jan 10, 1930Jul 28, 1931Herman FeldElectrically heated tool
US2019975 *Jan 23, 1935Nov 5, 1935Maitland Hoyer Frederick LewisMeans for spreading or removing materials
US2218420 *Nov 30, 1939Oct 15, 1940Coppedge James FLeading iron
US2249600 *Mar 23, 1940Jul 15, 1941Anthony D MincoffSki waxer
US2304559 *Dec 23, 1940Dec 8, 1942Joseph LewisElectric scraper
US2380855 *Feb 14, 1944Jul 31, 1945Lower Melvin SScraper
US3325627 *Sep 30, 1964Jun 13, 1967AdlerElectrically heated mixing spatula
GB764887A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3968345 *Sep 4, 1974Jul 6, 1976Michael KollmederCombined wax and edge sharpening apparatus for skiers
US4176657 *Oct 28, 1977Dec 4, 1979Primus-Sievert AbApparatus for waxing skis
US4238665 *Feb 23, 1978Dec 9, 1980Paul TremarcoElectrically heat tool
US4334793 *Mar 16, 1979Jun 15, 1982Gold Lode, Inc.Portable ski wax applicator
US5475199 *Dec 22, 1993Dec 12, 1995Buchanan; R. CraigPlanar electric heater with enclosed U-shaped thick film heating element
US5534061 *Jul 14, 1995Jul 9, 1996Fitzburgh; BrianApparatus for waxing snowboards, skis and the like
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/227, 401/1, 219/236, 30/140, 219/243, 401/2, 219/533, 219/228, 118/101
International ClassificationA63C11/00, A63C11/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63C11/08
European ClassificationA63C11/08