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Publication numberUS3711995 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 23, 1973
Filing dateJun 22, 1970
Priority dateJun 22, 1970
Also published asCA989675A1
Publication numberUS 3711995 A, US 3711995A, US-A-3711995, US3711995 A, US3711995A
InventorsAnderson R
Original AssigneeAnderson V Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Building structure
US 3711995 A
Abstract
Universal window structure which may be used as a single hung window, as a hopper window and as a right or left hand glider window without alteration is disclosed. Mulling means for securing a plurality of the window structures together, retaining clips for securing a screen thereto, false muntin structure, hurricane clips and piggyback storm window structure therefor and window trim structure for use therewith are specifically disclosed along with unique glazing strips, an insert for supporting sash balance structure, sealing strips and corner inserts, sash pivot structure, lock structure, sash guide and tilt release structure and hopper lock means for retaining the window sash in a plurality of separate tilted hopper positions. The frame of the window structure is constructed to permit rapid, accurate assembly with a minimum of low tolerance parts and to this end includes frame jamb adaptor extrusions. In addition, the total frame design allows many design variations whereby the universal window structure may be applied to and fit different building needs without additional job working or processing.
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 23, 1973 BUILDING STRUCTURE [57] ABSTRACT Universal window structure which may be used as a Inventor: Richard N. Anderson, Owensboro,

single hung window, as a hopper window and as a [73] Asslgnee' x 5 {:J' Owenright or left hand glider window without alteration is disclosed. Mulling means for securing a plurality of [22] Filed; June 22, 1970 the window structures together, retaining clips for securing a screen thereto, false muntin structure, hurricane clips and piggyback storm window structure [21] Appl. No.: 36,303

therefor and window trim structure for use therewith are specifically disclosed along with unique glazing 52 us. 51 Int. Cl. 1/04 SmPS Supporlmg Sash balance Structure sealing strips and corner inserts, sash pivot structure,

lock structure, sash guide and tilt release structure and hopper lock means for retaining the window sash in a [58] Field of Search ....49/504,

[56] References Cited plurality of separate tilted hopper positions. The frame UNITED STATES PATENTS of the window structure is constructed to permit rapid, accurate assembly with a minimum of low tolerance 5/1968 parts and to this end includes frame jamb adaptor ex- 10/1968 trusions. In addition, the total frame design allows 0/ 9 many design variations whereby the universal window 8/197] structure may be applied to and fit different building needs without additional job working or processing.

3,383,799 Anderson X 3,399,490 3,469,350 3,600,857

X 6 H 9 A Hettinger.....

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LaBarge et a1.

Primary Examiner-J. Karl Bell Attorneywhittemore, l-lulbert & Belknap 10 Claims, 11] Drawing Figures PATENTED A 23 I 7 v SHEET 05 0F 14 FIG.28

PATENTEUJAN 23 I915 SHEET OBUF 14 llO ZIO v INVENTOR. RICHARD N. ANDER S ON UL ,f'nx f ATTORNEYS PATENTEUJAHZB I973 3.711.995

SHEET U8UF 14 285 INVENTOR.

RICHARD N. ANDERSON M BY ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJAN 23 I975 SHEET 10 [1F 14 INVENTOR. RICHARD N. ANDERSON FIG.7OI

ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJAHZB ms 3, 71 l. 995

SHEET llUF 14 FIG.79 F|G.80.

' q r- 370 37s I 402 INVENTOR.

RICHQRD N. ANDERSON 404 BY ATTORNEYS PATENTEDJAH23 1913 3. 71 1.995

sum 13[]F 14 FIG.99

FIG.IO3

FIG. I04

58 4 INVENTOR.

RICHARD N. ANDERSON ATTORNEYS FIG. 7 is an enlarged section view of mulling structure such as illustrated in FIG. 6 for mulling window structure having a modified window frame cross section.

FIG. 8 is an enlarged section view of the head extrusion of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 particularly showing a glazing strip and a sash balance mounting insert in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIGS. 9, 10, ll, 12 and 13 illustrate possible modifications of the glazing strip cross section illustrated in FIG. 8.

FIG. 14 is an enlarged exploded elevation view of the upper right corner of the window structure of FIG. 1 illustrating the sash balance mounting insert in relation to a sash balance and the window frame.

FIG. 15 is a section view of a portion of the head and jamb extrusions of the window structure of FIG. 1 illustrating the sash balance and sash balance mounting insert in assembly therewith taken substantially on the line 15-15 in FIG. 14.

FIG. 16 is a section view of a portion of the head and jamb extrusions of the window structure of FIG. 1 illustrating the sash balance and sash balance mounting insert in assembly therewith taken substantially on the line 1616 in FIG. 14.

FIG. 17 is an enlarged perspective view of the sash balance mounting insert illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 14 through 16.

FIG. 18 is an enlarged broken away partial section view of the jamb of the window structure illustrated in FIG. I particularly showing the sash pivot structure and a removable sash balance in assembly therewith.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a part of the pivot structure of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 18.

FIG. 20 is a perspective view of another part of the pivot structure of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 18.

FIG. 21 is a perspective view of a modification of the part of the pivot structure illustrated in FIG. 20.

FIGS. 22, 23 and 24 are perspective views of sash pivot structure modifications suitable for use in the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 25 is a section view of the jamb extrusion of the window frame and jamb adaptor extrusion of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 showing a plan view of the head of the movable sash and sash guide and tilt release structure in assembly therewith.

FIG. 26 is a perspective view of a portion of the sash guide and tilt release structure illustrated in FIG. 25.

FIG. 27 is a perspective view of another portion of the sash guide and tilt release structure illustrated in FIG. 25.

FIGS. 28 and 29 are plan views of sash guide and tilt release structure modifications suitable for use with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 30, 31 and 32 are plan views of a combination sash guide, tilt release and locking structure modification suitable for use with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 33 and 34 are plan'views of another sash guide and tilt release structure modification suitable for use in the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 35 and 36 are perspective views of the parts of the sash guide and tilt release structure illustrated in FIGS. 33 and 34.

FIGS. 37, 38 and 39 are plan views of still another sash guide and tilt release structure modification suitable for use in the window structure of FIG. 1 which also includes a hopper lock feature.

FIG. 40 is an enlarged partial section view of the sash jamb extrusion of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 showing a hopper lock or sash retaining link in a pivoted position therein.

FIG. 41 is an elevation view of the hopper lock illustrated in FIG. 40 taken in the direction of arrow 41 in FIG. 40 and showing a portion of the sash jamb in assembly therewith.

FIG. 42 is a section view of the hopper lock illustrated in FIG. 40 taken substantially on line 4242 in FIG. 40 and showing a portion of the sash jamb in assembly therewith.

FIG. 43 is an elevation view of a modified hopper lock suitable for use with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 44, 45 and 46 illustrate modifications of the hopper lock modification illustrated in FIG. 43.

FIG. 47 is a section view of the jamb of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 taken substantially on the line 4747 in FIG. 49 and showing a hurricane clip constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIG. 48 is a perspective view of the hurricane clip illustrated in FIG. 47.

FIG. 49 is an enlarged section view of the jamb of the window structure illustrated in FIG. I particularly showing the sealing strip between the window frame and movable sash.

FIG. 50 is a partial section view similar to that of FIG. 49 and illustrating a modified sealing strip positioned between the window frame and movable sash.

FIG. 51 is a partial section view of the window structure of FIG. 1 similar to that of FIG. 50 and illustrating a screen retainer clip constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIG. 52 is a partial section view of the window structure of FIG. 1 similar to that of FIGS. 50 and 51 and illustrating a modified screen retainer clip constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIG. 53 is a reduced perspective view of the modified screen retainer clip illustrated in FIG. 52.

FIG. 54 is an elevation view of the lower right hand corner of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 showing a corner insert constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIG. 55 is a reduced perspective view of the corner insert illustrated in FIG. 54.

FIG. 56 is a reduced cross section view of the jamb extrusion of the window frame showing the comer insert of FIG. 55 in assembly therewith taken in the direction of arrow 56 in FIG. 54.

FIG. 57 is a reduced cross section view of the sill extrusion of the window frame showing the comer insert of FIG. 55 in assembly therewith taken in the direction of arrow 57 in FIG. 54.

FIGS. 58, 59 and 60 and FIGS. 61, 62 and 63 and FIGS. 64, 65 and 66 are similar to FIGS. 55, 56 and 57 and illustrate modified corner inserts in perspective view and in assembly with the jamb extrusion and the sill extrusion of the window frame respectively.

FIG. 67 is an enlarged section view of the sill of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 showing the locking mechanism therefor.

BUILDING STRUCTURE CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS The present application is related to applications Ser. No. 7,452, filed Feb. 2, I970, False Window Muntin Bar Structure, and Ser. No. 38,453, filed May 18, 1970, Window Structure, which disclose the false muntin structure and storm sash structure for use with the window structure disclosed herein in more detail.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The invention relates to building structure and refers more specifically to a prime window which is suitable for universal use as, for example, a single hung window, a hopper window or a right or left hand glider window without modification of the basic structure. The invention includes improvements in window frame construction, mulling means for the window, screen retaining clips, glazing strips, sash balance supporting structure, sealing structure including sealing strips, corner inserts and hurricane clips, pivot structure and locking means for the window and improvements in structure for guiding and releasing the movable sash of the window and for retaining the movable sash in use as a hopper window in predetermined pivoted positions along with false muntin structure, piggyback storm sash and window trim structure for the window.

2. Description of the Prior Art In the past, window structure has generally been designed for a single use. That is, it has been designed as a singlehung window, as a hopper window, or as a glider window, for example. Such single purpose windows require large dealer inventories to meet demand for each type of window, which is undesirable.

In addition, window structures of the past have not been constructed to be as simply manufactured with tolerances as low as the window structure of the invention so that they have had relatively high production costs. Also, with past window structures it has not always been possible to as readily mull the window structures for multiple installation or to retain accessories such as screens and sash balances in assembly therewith.

Furthermore, the sealing of prior window structures has permitted excessive air passage, and the pivot details of hopper windows have not permitted raising and lowering of the hopper sash. Thus, windows permitting up and down movement of a sash have rarely in the past also permitted swinging of the sash about one edge thereof.

Also, the locking means of prior window structures has not generally permitted movement of the locking means on the sash, and no provision for ventilation with a locked window has been provided in slidable windows of the past without the addition of secondary hardware. Further, separate means for locking, guiding and securing the hopper sash in a pivoted position have often been required in previous window structures which have added to the expense of the window structures.

Wherein separate small glazing panels have been provided in windows of the past, either separate dividing muntins have been required or false muntin structure has been used which has been complicated and therefore expensive. Similarly, storm windows of the past have usually been complete window structures in themselves positioned over the entire prime window structure whereby many of the components of the prime window structure have been unnecessarily duplicated. Window trim specifically constructed to make a rapid, economical and esthetically pleasing transition between a window and adjacent wall has not generally been available previously.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The window constructed in accordance with the invention functions without modification as a single hung window, a hopper window and a glider window due to the elimination of fixed tongue and groove guide means between the window frame and movable sash permitting ready separation of the sash and frame. The window frame has been constructed to require a minimum of close tolerance parts and to facilitate assembly thereof as well as to accommodate assembly therewith of a screen and sash balance if required.

The glazing of the window has been improved with special glazing strips, pivoting of the movable sash and removal thereof has been improved by means of special pivot structure. Locking of the movable sash of the window structure has also been improved by the inclusion of particular locking construction in the window and the guiding of the movable sash of the window is accomplished by unique construction in accordance with the invention.

Sealing of the movable sash is accomplished by improved sealing strips, hurricane clips and frame corner inserts, while the retaining of the movable sash in a hopper position is improved with hopper locks provided in accordance with the invention.

Also, a simple, economical and efficient false muntin structure and a storm window sash adapted to be secured to prime window structure in a piggyback fashion are included in the universal window structure invention along with unique trim moldings for facilitating the esthetic installation of the window.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is an exploded broken view of the universal window structure of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a reduced perspective view of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 in the position of the window structure installed as either a single hung or hopper window with the movable sash in a tilted or hopper position and illustrating false muntin structure in assembly therewith.

FIG. 3 is a reduced view of the window structure of FIG. 1 in the position of the window structure installed as a glider window with the movable sash closed and false muntin structure in assembly therewith.

FIG. 4 is a broken section view of a pair of window structures such as illustrated in FIG. I mounted adjacent each other with mulling structure therebetween in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 5 is an enlarged section view of the mulling structure and associated window structure illustrated in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 is an enlarged section view similar to FIG. 5 illustrating modified mulling structure for mulling the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 68 is a reduced perspective view of a portion of the locking mechanism illustrated in FIG. 67.

FIG. 69 is a section view similar to that of FIG. 67 and illustrating modified locking structure for use with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 70 is a section view similar to FIG. 69 showing another modified window locking structure in assembly therewith.

FIGS. 71 and 72 are perspective views of parts of the locking structure illustrated in FIG. 70.

FIG. 73 is an enlarged partial section view of false muntin structure for use with the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 taken on the line 7373 in FIG. 2.

FIG. 74 is a section view of the false muntin structure similar to FIG. 73 and showing the method of connection of the false muntin bar members.

FIG. 75 is a perspective view of the interlocking member of the false muntin structure illustrated in FIG. 73.

FIG. 76 is a perspective view of one of the false muntin members of the false muntin structure illustrated in FIG. 73.

FIG. 77 is an enlarged perspective view of a universal retaining clip for securing the false muntin structure illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3 to the frame of the universal window structure.

FIG. 78 is an enlarged plan view of a modified universal retaining clip for use in securing the false muntin structure to the frame of the universal window.

FIG. 79 is an elevation view of the retaining clip illustrated in FIG. 78 taken substantially in the direction of arrow 79 in FIG. 78.

FIG. 80 is an elevation view of the retaining clip illustrated in FIG. 78 taken in the direction of arrow 80 in FIG. 78.

FIGS. 81, 82 and 83 are perspective views of additional modifications of the retaining clip illustrated in FIG. 77.

FIG. 84 is a section view of one jamb of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 showing storm sash structure constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIG. 85 is an enlarged perspective view of a dual durometer plastic strip member of the storm sash structure illustrated in FIG. 84.

FIG. 86 is a section view similar to the section view of FIG. 84 and showing modified storm sash structure in assembly with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 87 is an enlarged perspective view of a dual durometer plastic strip member of the storm sash structure illustrated in FIG. 86.

FIG. 88 is a perspective view of a retainer clip for use in securing a storm sash as illustrated in FIG. 86 to the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 89 is another section view similar to the section view of FIG. 84 and showing another modified storm sash structure in assembly with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 90 is a perspective view of a retainer clip for use in securing a storm sash as illustrated in FIG. 86 to the prime window structure illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 91 is another section view similar to the section view of FIG. 84 and showing still another modified storm sash structure in assembly with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 92 is a perspective view of a retainer clip for use in securing a storm sash as illustrated in FIG. 91 to the prime window structure illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 93 is another section view similar to the section view of FIG. 84 and showing still another modified storm sash structure in assembly with the window structure of FIG. 1.

FIG. 94 is a perspective view of a retainer clip for use in securing a storm sash as illustrated in FIG. 93 to the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIG. 95 is a section view of one jamb of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 secured in position in a wall and particularly illustrating window trim structure constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIGS. 96 and 97 are enlarged cross section views of trim members of the window trim structure illustrated in FIG. 95.

FIG. 98 is a section view of one jamb of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 secured in position in a wall and illustrating modified window trim structure constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIG. 99 is a cross section view of an expander member for use in window trim structure as illustrated in FIG. 98.

FIGS. 100, 101, 102, 103 and 104 are section views of modified window trim members for use in window trim structure as illustrated in FIG. 98.

FIG. 105 is a perspective view of an enlarged corner bracket for use in window trim structure as illustrated in FIG. 98.

FIG. 106 is a section view, similar to FIG. 98, of one jamb of the window structure illustrated in FIG. 1 secured in position in a wall and illustrating modified window trim structure constructed in accordance with the invention in assembly therewith.

FIGS. 107 and 108 are views of the mitered end of one of the window trim members illustrated in FIG. 106 and illustrating a corner bracket in assembly therewith.

FIGS. 109, 110 and 111 are top, bottom and side views respectively of the comer bracket illustrated in FIGS. 107 and 108 for securing the window trim structure in FIG. 106 together at mitered comers.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS The universal, prime window structure of the invention illustrated in use as a hopper window and as a glider window in FIGS. 2 and 3 respectively is shown in more detail in FIG. I.

The window structure of FIG. 1 includes a frame 12 constructed of head, jamb and sill extrusions 14, 16 and 18, best shown in FIGS. 8, 24 and 64 respectively, in conjunction with a jamb adaptor extrusion 20 shown in FIG. 24 and a frame check rail extrusion 22 extending between the jamb extrusions l6 centrally thereof. The head, jamb and sill extrusions are mitered at the corners of the frame 12 and are secured together by means of screws extending through the head and sill extrusions at the ends thereof and into the screw runner grooves 21 and 23 in jamb members 16.

Jamb adaptor extrusions 20 are formed from an extrusion section miter-cut at each end and then cut in two centrally. The jamb adaptor extrusions 20 having one square-cut end are then slidably mounted on the frame jamb extrusions 16 by means of the cooperating tongue and groove structures 28 and 30 illustrated best in FIG. 24. The square-cut ends of the jamb adaptor extrusions 20 are positioned against the head extrusion 14 with the glazing flange 32 of the head extrusion I4 notched to receive the square-cut ends of the jamb adaptor extrusions 20.

The mitered ends of the frame check rail 22 are then placed in engagement with the miter-cut ends of the jamb adaptor extrusions 20 and the frame check rail is screw-connected to the jamb extrusions 16 to complete the frame 12. If desired, additional screws may be inserted through the frame check rail 22 and into the screw runner grooves 32 of the jamb adaptor extrusions 20 and through the head extrusion 14 of the window frame 12 and into the screw runner grooves 32. The additional screws provide a more rigid construction; however, are not essential.

The particular jamb adaptor extrusions 20 and their assembly with the frame 12 in the construction of the window structure 10 simplifies the extrusions necessary for the frame 12 and the tolerances which must be maintained in cutting the frame members. Thus, the jambs 16 may be of a single extrusion in cross section for their entire length. Furthermore, since the check rail extrusion 22 is not particularly critical in location vertically of the window frame 12, the jamb adaptor extrusion sections from which extrusions 20 are formed need not be initially cut to an exact length but need only be divided centrally, since in assembly they will then similarly position the ends of the check rail extrusion 22 vertically of the frame 12. Also, with the slip fit of the jamb adaptor extrusions 20, fabrication of the jamb adaptor extrusions and frame jamb, head and check rail extrusions is minimized.

With the frame 12 including the nailing flange 36 and extension 38 therearound, window structures such as that illustrated in FIG. 1 in either the position illustrated in FIG. 2 or FIG. 3 may be mulled side by side or vertically with the mull structure illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. Thus, multiple adjacent window installation is possible with the window structure 10.

As shown' best in FIG. 5, adjacent window structures 10 are positioned so that the nailing flanges 36 overlap when it is desired to mull the window structures. In assembly the inside mulling member 40 is then first clipped into the pocket 42 formed in the jamb extrusion 16 of a window structure 10 installed in a fixed location. The second window structure 10 is then placed adjacent the first window structure with the nailing flanges 36 overlapping as shown in FIG. 5, and the inside mull member 40 is clipped into the pocket 42 in and the nailing flanges 36 is exposed to a greater exterior pressure than the area 47 between the nailing flanges 36 and the interior mull member 40 and the seal provided by the mull member 44, nailing flanges 36 and mull member 40 is progressively tighter toward the mull member 40. Rain driven into area 45 is thus less likely to penetrate through area 47 and ultimately into the interior of a building having window structure 10 installed therein than with other mull structure.

The window structure may also be mulled with the mulling extrusion 46 illustrated in FIG. 6. When using the mulling extrusion 46, the nailing flanges 36 of jamb extrusions 16 are broken off at the notch 48 shown in FIG. 5. Again, the mulling extrusion 46 is positioned in assembly with a first window structure 10 as illustrated in FIG. 6, and a second window structure 10 is then assembled with the mulling extrusion 46 to complete the mulling operation. The mulling extrusion 46 may also be used to mull window structure having different jamb extrusion cross sections 49 as particularly illustrated in FIG. 7.

The glazing panels 50 and 52 of the window structure 10 as particularly shown in FIG. 8 are secured in the frame 12 and the window sash 54 by glazing strips 56 which are received in recesses in the frame and sash members such as recess 58 in the frame head extrusion 14. The glazing strip 56 illustrated in FIG. 8 was evolved from the glazing strips illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 10 and includes a generally L-shaped member which is adapted to be secured in the recess 58 with one end 60 in engagement with the periphery of a glazing panel to hold the glazing panel in position.

Separating the end 62 of the glazing strip 56 into two leg portions permits easy assembly of the strip 56 in recesses 58 and 61, while inclining the portion of the strip 56 between the ends 60 and 62 thereof at an angle to the glazing panel 50 with the portion thereof adjacent the end 60 independently flexible permits use of a single glazing strip with a greater selection of glazing panel widths with substantially the same esthetics. Thus, with only the two separate glazing strips 56 and 76 of FIGS. 8 and 11, substantially the entire range of normal glass widths may be glazed in either the frame 12 or the sash 54 of the window structure 10.

More specifically, the modified glazing strip 64 of FIG. 9 includes the initial L-shaped portion 68 having a solid foot portion 66 connected to one end thereof. The part 69 of the L-shaped portion of strip 64 is nominally parallel to a glass pane glazed thereby.

The modified glazing strip 70 illustrated in FIG. 10 shows the foot portion and part of the one end of the L- shaped portion of the glazing strip split to provide leg parts 72 and 74 permitting easier assembly and disassembly of the strip 70 by the flexing of the leg parts 72 and 74.

The glazing strip 56 of FIG. 8 followed strips 64 and 70 to provide for uniform glazing strip appearance with different thicknesses of glass and to provide greater clamping strength for the glazing strip 56 on the glazing panel 50.

Glazing strip 76 illustrated in FIG. 11 was developed along with and is substantially the same as glazing strip 56. Glazing strip 76 has a longer foot portion 78. Also, the part 80 of the L-shaped portion of the glazing strip 76 is less inclined than the similar portion of the glazing strip 56, and the part 65 of the L-shaped portion of the glazing strip 76 is considerably shorter than the corresponding part 60 of the glazing strip 56. The glazing strip 76 is used in the first recess 58 to accommodate glazing panels thicker than can be conveniently glazed with glazing strip 56 in the first recess 58 and thinner than can be conveniently glazed with glazing strip 56 in recess 81. The glazing strip 76 is used in conjunction with the second recess 81 in the frame and sash members to permit installation of particularly thick insulating glazing panels in the window structure 10. By using the two glazing strips 56 and 76 in conjunction with the two recesses 58 and 81 in he window structure 10, the entire range of normal glazing panel thicknesses may be accommodated in the window structure 10 so that only two glazing strips need be stocked.

A projection 82 has been provided on the modified glazing strip 84 which is otherwise substantially the same as the glazing strip 56. The projection 82 as shown in FIG. 12 is used to flex the part 67 of the glazing strip 84 to allow movement of the foot portion 69 into the recess 58 or 81. Thus, the glazing strip 84 may be hand installed by first placing the part 71 in a recess 58 or 81 and pivoting the glazing strip toward the glazing panel about the part 71 so that the foot portion 69 is rotated into the recess 58 or 81 due to flexing of the part 67 away from the glazing panel on contact of the projection 82 with the glazing panel. In contrast, the foot portion 73 of the glazing strip 56 is first inserted in a recess 58 or 81 and a tool is used to roll the leg portion 62 into the recess 58 or 81 on installation of the glazing strip 56.

The modified glazing strip 77 illustrated in FIG. 13 includes the foot portion 79 adapted to be inserted in the recess 58 or 81 to secure the strip 77 to the frame or sa'sh of the window structure 10, the L-shaped portion 83 connected to the foot portion 79 at one end and having the notches 85 therein as shown and the portion 87 connected to the foot portion 79 and separated from the L-shaped portion 83. In use, the portion 87 of the glazing strip 77 is urged into wedging engagement with the notches 85 to force the end 75 of the L-shaped portion 83 against a glazing panel. The glazing strip 77 has the advantage of being easy to install without the use of special equipment. The glazing strip 77 also accommodates a particularly wide range of glazing panels with the same general esthetic appearance.

The movable sash 54 of the window structure 10 includes the head extrusion 86, the jamb extrusions 88, shown better in cross section in FIG. 49, and the sill extrusion 90, shown better in cross section in FIG. 67. As shown better in FIG. 2, the window sash 54 may be pivoted about the bottom thereof to provide a hopper window in place of the conventional single hung window with the window frame 12 in a vertical position. With he window structure 10 in the position shown in FIG. 3, the sash 54 is movable horizontally to provide a glider window. When used as a glider window, the window structure 10 may be installed as either a right or left glider. Thus, the window structure 10 cannot be installed upside down as a glider window.

A sash balance such as the sash balance structure 89 of FIG. 14 is not necessary in the window structure 10 when used as a glider window as in FIG. 3. Further, sash balance structure is not essential with lighter window sash 54 with the window structure 10 used as a single hung window as in FIG. 1 or as a hopper window as in FIG. 20. The securing of sash balance structure 89 to the frame jambs 16 of the window structure 10 during initial assembly of the window structure 10 requires separate windows to be inventoried depending on the ultimate use of the windows. Alternatively, the securing of the separate sash balance structure 89 to the window structure 10 may be accomplished in the field by screws or the like as shown in FIG. 1. Heavy inventories and field assembly of sash balance structure is objectionable. Therefore, a sash balance supporting insert 91 shown in perspective in FIG. 17 and illustrated in assembly with the sash balance structure 89 and positioned in the frame head and frame jamb extrusions l4 and 16 respectively in FIGS. 14 through 16 is provided to make one window structure 10 universally usable without objectionable field assembly of sash balance structure.

As illustrated in FIG. 14, the sash balance structure 89 is supported by the projection 93 on the insert 91 extending through the opening 95 in the sash balance structure 89. The insert 91 with the sash balance structure 89 held thereon by the thin fins 107 extending into the hollow tube 109 of the sash balance structure is placed in the pocket 97 in the frame head extrusion 14 and is moved toward the jamb extrusion 16 until the barb portions 99 of the insert 91 cam over the portions 101 and 103 of the jamb extrusion l6 cross section to lock the insert 91 in position. Camming of the barb portions 99 over the portions 101 and 103 of the jamb extrusions 16 is permitted due to flexing of the portions 106 of the insert 91. With the barbs positioned over the portions 101 and 103 of the jamb extrusion 16, the sash balance assembly 89 is supported in the pocket 110 in the jamb extrusion 16 as shown, for example, in FIG. 16.

The sash 54 is guided at the bottom in the position illustrated in FIG. 2 for movement vertically in the plane of the frame 12 by the pivot structure 92 illustrated best in FIGS. 18, 19 and 20. The pivot structure 92 also permits tilting of the sash 54 about the bottom thereof into the hopper window position illustrated in FIG. 2. Further, the pivot structure 92 is constructed of two separate parts 94 and 96 which are disengageable to permit removing of the movable sash 54 from the frame 12 of the window structure 10 as desired.

The part 94 illustrated best in FIG. 20 includes a generally rectangular portion 98, a generally cylindrical portion and an intermediate flange 102. A countersunk screw opening 104 extends through the part 94 to permit mounting of the part 94 in the sash jamb recess 106 as illustrated particularly in FIG. 18. With the part 94 installed in each sash jamb extrusion 88 adjacent the bottom thereof, the flange 102 provides sliding engagement with the frame jamb 16 on movement of the sash 54 relative to the frame 12. The mounting screw for the part 94 extends into a screw runner 106 in the sash sill extrusion 90 illustrated best in FIG. 67 for assembly of the sash 54.

With or without the part 96, the part 94 provides a pivot mounting and guide for the sash 54. The part 96 is used in conjunction with a sash balance tape 120 of sash balance structure 89. The part 96 in assembly is positioned in the pocket 110 formed in the frame jamb extrusion l6 and receives the elliptical end 100 of the part 94 in the recess 112 therein. The recess 112 is open on two sides as shown best in FIG. 19 to allow the end 100 of the part 94 to engage the edges 28 of the

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3383799 *Jun 6, 1966May 21, 1968Anderson Mfg Co V EDoor structure
US3399490 *Aug 4, 1966Sep 3, 1968Weatherproof Products CorpTilt-out sash window
US3469350 *Sep 14, 1967Sep 30, 1969Soule Steel CoDoor frame assembly and method for making same
US3600857 *Jun 11, 1969Aug 24, 1971Aluminum Co Of AmericaInsulated window assembly with movable sash
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4237665 *Feb 21, 1978Dec 9, 1980Radway Plastics LimitedStructural elements for building construction and assemblies incorporating these elements
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Classifications
U.S. Classification49/504
International ClassificationE06B3/32, E06B3/968, E06B3/58, E06B3/50, E06B3/96, E06B1/32, E06B1/04
Cooperative ClassificationE06B3/5821, E06B3/9685, E06B3/50, E06B1/32
European ClassificationE06B1/32, E06B3/50, E06B3/58B4, E06B3/968D2
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 14, 1986ASAssignment
Owner name: ALCAN ALUMINUM CORPORATION
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:ALCAN ALUMINUM CORPORATION, A CORP OF N.Y. (INTO);ALCAN PROPERTIES, INC., A CORP OF OHIO, (CHANGED TO);REEL/FRAME:004536/0214
Effective date: 19860407